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19

Personally, I suspect this is mostly an American (USA) stereotype, which chiefly originates from a couple of factors. We had a couple of large waves of East European immigration in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, which brought large numbers of Poles who knew little or no English. As human beings, we tend to perceive those who have trouble ...


12

One reason was that the "Anglos" brought their own women with them. For instance, there were women passengers on the Mayflower. And twelve years after the settlement at Jamestown, there was a boatload of women (in 1619), followed by many more. The Spaniards also had more "multicultural" dealings, as noted in the comments above. The Spanish religious ...


9

Derogatory racial (for lack of a better word) stereotypes tell much about the people who spread them. For instance, in my field - software development, you are not likely to come across "Polish jokes", because some of the best developers in top tech firms are Polish and Polish universities regularly outperform US teams in international programming contests. ...


8

There just weren't a lot of such people in the US in the 1800's, at least until the Mexican/American war. No census bothered to count them, which is a pretty good indication right there. At the beginning of the century the census just counted "free white", "slave", and "free colored". After the Civil war, they dropped slave, and split non-white into "black" ...


7

Two hundred years ago, travelling from one end of Europe to the other took weeks or months. Moving that far was more or less inconceivable. If you did move that far it meant that you almost certainly would never see your family and friends again. It was a big step done by very few people. Today you can fly anywhere in the world in a day. Moving to the ...


5

It depends on how you define "Manchu." The Sibe (Xibe) were NOT the same as the Jurchen tribe, the one that is generally regarded as "Manchu." What IS true is that the Sibe lived in the center of present day Manchuria, next to the Jurchens. By that very loose definition, they are "Manchu." The Jurchens defeated the Sibe (and others) in 1593, and took over ...


5

The Nabateans had given up the nomadic life long before the construction of the most famous buildings at Petra, such as the Treasury in the 1st century AD. Petra had been the Nabatean capital for around 400 years at this point, and the Nabateans had been Hellenized since 150 BC--they were even ruled by kings with names like Aretas III Philhellene. By the ...


4

I don't know if you meant complete democratic examples, but Alberto Fujimori is a pretty famous example of your request, he lead Peru a little longer than ten years, as he has been elected enacted neo-liberal reforms, then after a crisis his system turned into a nightmare. In US, Obama could be an example if the US itself wouldn't be heterogenous already.


4

Interracial marriage is not so uncommon. Probably the absence of same-race women played a role, but Portuguese were also well known to marry local wives in Africa, while British and French people usually didn't The fact that Portuguese and Spaniards have a multirracial origin (arab, celtic, roman, goth) might also have some influence.


3

The question rests on a false assumption - that "country" can be tied to "ethnicity". There are a few countries that make an effort at racial purity, but I think that the concept has fallen by the wayside. There is a second flaw in the question. "Democratically elected" means "elected by those we choose to have the franchise" - Generally this excludes ...


3

There was no such umbrella term in common use in the 1800s that corresponds directly to our "Hispanic" or "Latino" category. I think T.E.D.’s answer is correct in that people with Mexican origins were called Mexicans. But for the most part, there was no distinct “Hispanic” identity, and so there was no need for an umbrella term. Mexican-Americans in the ...


2

Mostly good old fashioned racism. The target is different for different cultures (Polish people in USA, Irish people in UK, etc.), but the general idea is to insult the people you don't like.


2

Petra was built at a time when the Alexandrian empire was in operation and the Antigonid Dynasty was in power in that area. The southern part of that empire was nearly waterless desert and occupied by nomadic tribes, some of whom were known as Nabataeans. Apparently they formed an alliance with the Antigonids that allowed them to prosper and benefit by the ...


1

Before the war, the province of Silesia was united. The League of Nation imposed autonomy of the Province of Upper Silesia within Prussia: It was separated from the Province of Lower Silesia which was almost exclusively German. A polish majority remained in almost all districts of the Upper Silesia province: Only the districts of Falkenberg, Neisse, ...


1

I've found one contemporary source in the university library but it seems to be extremely biased. It's a slim 30-pages brochure called "The Poles in Germany and the Germans in Poland" by one George Kurnatowski, a political science professor from Warsaw, published in 1927. Prof. Kurnatowski is strenuosly trying to show that the Poles in Germany are ...


1

It's common for nearby groups to have jokes told about them, from gentle ribbing going on to more serious X-ism, where X is race, or national, or whatever. Inside the US, there are jokes about Texans, New Englanders, Vermonters. Ohio has jokes about neighboring Kentucky. I imagine that most nations have the same thing with countries alongside. Since ...



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