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11

No one "coined" it; it is a romanization of the genitive form of Muhammad ibn Abd al-Wahhab. The -i suffix is the usual way to transliterate it, just as we have Saudi, Kuwaiti, Omani, and so on. (The more common way in English to create a genitive for a thinker would be to use the Greek-derived -ic or the Latin-derived -an, hence you do see Wahhabic and ...


11

Isra'el means "he struggles with God" and is the name granted to Jacob after he wrestles with an angel in Genesis 32: Then Jacob was left alone, and a man wrestled with him until daybreak. When he saw that he had not prevailed against him, he touched the socket of his thigh; so the socket of Jacob’s thigh was dislocated while he wrestled with him. Then ...


7

The Standard Model of particle physics got its name from the late Sam Treiman. It was first coined in 1975 when Treiman, together with long time friend Abraham Pais, published a paper in which they used "standard model" to reference the four quarks theory. The term 'Standard Model' was first coined by Pais and Treiman in (1975), with reference to the ...


7

As an addendum to Choster's answer, Here is the English usage of "Wahhabi", according to Google's book data: (Click for larger image)


6

First, Haiti achieved independence in 1804, way before the US Civil-War. Haiti was originally called Saint-Domingue Wikipedia says that name was originally "Ayiti" as derived from Taíno and African languages At the end of the double battle for emancipation and independence, former slaves proclaimed the independence of Saint-Domingue on 1 January ...


5

Satan is a character from Hebrew mythology1. His most full representation found in the Tanakh is the first two chapters of Job in which הַשָּׂטָן (ha-Satan) appears along with the בְּנֵי הָאֱלֹהִים (ben 'elohiym) before God. Job becomes the topic of conversation (on God's initiative) and Satan suggests that Job only worships God because of the blessings he ...


5

The earliest references I could find where Satan is called διάβολος, are in the Book of Revelation, written somewhere between 70 AD to 90 AD in Koine Greek: (2:10) ΜΗ ΦΟΒΟΥ ΜΗΔΕΝ ΕΚ ΤΩΝ ΟΣΑ ΜΕΛΛΕΙΣ ΝΑ ΠΑΘΗΣ ΙΔΟΥ Ο ΔΙΑΒΟΛΟΣ ΜΕΛΛΕΙ ΝΑ ΒΑΛΗ ΤΙΝΑΣ ΕΞ ΥΜΩΝ ΕΙΣ ΦΥΛΑΚΗΝ ΔΙΑ ΝΑ ΔΟΚΙΜΑΣΘΗΤΕ ΚΑΙ ΘΕΛΕΤΕ ΕΧΕΙ ΘΛΙΨΙΝ ΔΕΚΑ ΗΜΕΡΩΝ ΓΙΝΟΥ ΠΙΣΤΟΣ ΜΕΧΡΙ ΘΑΝΑΤΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΘΕΛΩ ...


4

OK, there seems to be 3 distinct namings here, that need to be discussed separately. First of all, the self-identified name. In Khazakh language, the official name of the country is "Қазақстан Республикасы", with a "k"; and it was always spelled that way. In English, the correct answer is "it doesn't really matter". English frequently mangles the ...


4

The best answer to your actual question I know of is Belgium. When the country was created, it was sort of a mishmash of different languages and cultures, which broke off from the Dutch because the rulers there couldn't stop themselves from trying to push their own religion and language on the inhabitants. Given that history, they really needed a neutral ...


4

USSR was mentioned in another answer as related to Poland, but USSR - and Russian Empire before 1917 - had a strong habit of doing this. As a random example: Kaliningrad was renamed from Königsberg after USSR annexed it from Germany following WW2 Königsberg was renamed Kaliningrad in 1946 after the death of Chairman of the Presidium of the Supreme ...


4

"Assassin" doesn't really mean somebody paid to kill. It rather means somebody who kills a prominent person by surprise attack. (1, 2, 3) Latin seems to have had a word for this: sicarius. I don't know if ancient Greek did.


3

In France they called it "The Great War" (La Grande Guerre), pacifist veterans called it "La der' des der'" (The Last of the Last (Wars)). In England it was called the World War, or the Great War. I think the German diplomats were the first to call it a World War (Weltkrieg), before it even began. I don't know of any other names for it in German. i know ...


3

I saw one in Germany - can't remember which city. I had the impression that it was not uncommon. I've also heard this in connection with Cosa Nostra.


3

I think a complete reply here is impossible, because of the sheer number of such events in history. However, these events are more common after (I'd say) the French Revolution when the modern concept of "nation" was born. The best such example (I think) is that of Turkey and Greece. Both these countries where multicultural and multilanguage in the ...


3

After annexing Poland in 1939, Nazi Germany administration renamed some of Polish cities: Łódź was renamed to Litzmannstadt, Gdynia was renamed to Gotenhafen. After 1863 and January Uprising failure, Russian administration used name Kraj Privislansky (Vistula Territories) referring to territories of former Kingdom of Poland ( ...


3

Named differently from original inhabitants: America, Australia, New Zealand Changing names: Irish people & governments don't often use the term "British Isles" to include Ireland. The city of Derry/Londonderry in Northern Ireland is another example of name changes. However each tribe wants to call it by their name. Names are a complex issue, people ...


2

According to the Hebrew commentators on the word, "Isra" means "fought" and is derived from the root "sar", and there is a double entendre because it also means lord or prince, "sar". So in this context it seems to mean "lorded over greater powers" - i.e. he won the fight against the angel, i.e. "El" (which can mean any sort of higher power, not necessarily ...


2

The origins of the term are somewhat obscure. In the book "The Rise of the Standard Model: Particle Physics in the 1960's and 1970's," the authors write: In the late 1970s elementary particle physicists began speaking of the "Standard Model" as basic theory of matter.... The model is referred to as "standard," because it provides a theory of ...


1

This discussion on the Linguist List discusses the frequent use of capitalized words in early printed materials, which was used to mark salience -- importance. The comment says: "You'll find it to varying degrees in most of the major languages of the region during this time period... In the English-speaking world, the practice was maintained, at least to ...


1

I wouldn't be at all surprised if the term originates from the Tudor period of Henry the VIII whose emblem of the House of Tudor was the red rose. This excerpt from the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) does indeed point to it: under the rose: privately, in secret, in strict confidence; = sub rosa adv. Also in extended and allusive use. [The origin ...



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