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There is no general answer; each reason has its own answer. Japan has a high population density and limited arable land, so the evolution of a mega-city like Tokyo with skyscrapers is a technical solution to a national challenge. Singapore and Hong Kong have a limited amount of land; the only option for increasing space was to grow up. China is undergoing ...


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Actually,europe has much greater that skyscrapers it has history, personally i love europe the way it is with charming and historical buildings it is kinda way of identity if europe builds skyscrapers everywhere i wouldn't visit it nothing much to see


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Spices were what we would nowadays call mass luxuries. These are luxury goods that the masses can afford in small quantities. They are desired because they are out of the ordinary, and offer a "change of pace." They are expensive on a per-unit basis, but it is the "smallness" of use that makes them affordable. Spices had both these qualities at the time. So ...


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In architecture "Norman" is just the insular British term for Romanesque architecture in Britain and Normandy since Romanesque architecture was basically introduced to Britain when the Norman Dynasty ruled England. It is like the insular British and American term "Victorian" for 19th century architecture. The reason why the Normans and "Normans" associated ...


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The Normans, this "bunch of Vikings" as you call then, did not build cathedrals with their own hands. They hired stonemasons and other craftsmen to do it.


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In the late sixties. This is called "sexual revolution", and some social scientists explain it by invention of reliable and convenient contraceptives ("the Pill"). Of course, decline in religion is also an important ingredient, but this process began much earlier, I mean in Western Europe. In other parts of the world this happened later. For example in the ...


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The whole history of clothing in ancient times is more complex than we see at face value. Tyrian purple was reserved to emperors and royalty in later times not so much because it was difficult to import and thus expensive. It became a status symbol because of its price which was due to the fact that it took 12,000 snails to produce just 1.4 grams of this ...


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One of the factors that holds china together is a man called Qin, who was chief of one of the small nations who were allocated to raise the horses for the federation. At that time, his tribe rose up and unified all those little states under a federation with a strong hierarchy system, significantly the written format, length units, weight units, money, and ...


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When the shovel became standard issue for infantry between World Wars 1 and 2. I don't believe swords were ever "standard issue" for infantry but certainly starting with Napoleon bayonets were. German infantry did so well against all other counterparts in North Africa because Erwin Rommel made sure all soldiers had a shovel, knew how to use it and in fact ...


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Entrance varied dramatically by time and place, with students enrolling at Oxford or Paris around the age of 14 to study the liberal arts, and at Bologna around the age of 30 to study law. Historically the curriculum of a liberal arts degree was first the study of the trivium of grammar, rhetoric and logic, followed by the quadrivium of arithmetic, ...


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A person would have to successfully complete what we would now call a "grammar school." Mostly, a person had to be able to read and write, but in several languages. Latin, which was the "universal" language, plus their native language, and many also studied Greek. After the Renaissance, French, Italian, and Spanish. Except for people who were English or ...


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Nope. There isn't. Since there is no competition with "China from China" the best way to value ceramics both yesterday and today is by weight(lighter the better), color (blues and bright whites in contrast), hardness (thin but strong), form (simple plate or a vase for holding water implying enormous strength), etc The only way a laymen might pick up a fraud ...


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There is an informative Wikipedia article. A (reddish) purple dye extracted from Murex sea snails found on the coast of what is now Lebanon, ancient Phoenicia was a luxury product in the ancient Mediterranean world, being rare and therefore expensive and had the useful quality that instead of fading over time when worn in sunlight, it actually became ...


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The Roman color purple might have been any shade of red or purple, or range of shades, as far as I know, unless an expert in Roman colors wants to elaborate. Of course anything colored with actual Tyrian Purple dye would have a known shade. You should remember that during the Principate period the emperor was the real but unofficial absolute ruler of the ...


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The primary reason that the wearing of purple developed as a status symbol in ancient Rome is because it was expensive to import and therefore rare. Due to its rarity, it was later limited to the emporer and the upper class.


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you might read from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Islamic_contributions_to_Medieval_Europe and the reference


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No. That theory doesn't make a whole lot of sense. First, while the Vikings and the Germans practiced "pagan" religions, their status as "co-religionists" was tenuous at best. Nor did they have other meaningful ties (other than perhaps shared DNA through various wanderings). Vikings were not likely to think "This guy Charlemagne is hurting our Germans, so ...


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It just doesn't seem plausible to my ignorant brain just to see an enemy army and shout "ATTAAACK!" without first saying something to the enemy commander, especially in a situation where it was the respective armies first encounter. That makes me think there might have been a formal and cultural way of doing it. Ideally, you'd like to shout "attack!" ...


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I have looked at the descriptions of many of the battles, especially the 100 Years' War, and most of them were preceded by negotiations, leading us to believe that it may have been customary and was at the very least common.


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Sounds like a villain in a James Bond movie. Seriously...dispatching emissaries prior to any contact with friend or foe alike was I believe it was considered normative in Roman Times especially prior to giving battle as there are no greater victories than ones that require no battle be given in the first place. This would change during Imperial Rome though. ...


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What is certainly known about the possibility of a real King Arthur . . . is that it's possible he existed. That much is noncontroversial. However, I'm of the "where there's smoke, there's fire" school of thought, meaning I believe the "possible" can be pushed to become "probable." Here's the skeleton of my argument. The Battle of Badon is generally ...



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