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2

What your teacher teaches you is unfortunately a complete nonsense and political propaganda. There were no "Ukrainians" until the 17 century, and the notion of "proto-Ukrainians" (as people who lived of this territory) is unscientific. This is a good example of the use of history for political propaganda. Very many different peoples lived on the territory ...


3

As Mr. Durden says, any estimate is going to have a very wide range/confidence interval. If you want an answer to the question you asked, you're probably better off asking in a math stack exchange about statistics. Having said that, 10 minutes of research will answer your question. Starting with the page you cite and checking the references, the List of ...


10

First off, I think Semaphore's answer has it right (which is why I upvoted it). Your teacher is almost certainly thinking of the Proto-Indo-Europeans. "Proto-" is a prefix commonly used to talk about the theoretical common ancestors of several seemingly related languages. Thus "Proto-Indo-European" would refer to the ancestors of all Indo-European speakers. ...


4

This is not really true because there is no such thing as "proto-Ukrainian people". Both Ukrainians and Russians were invaders who came to their current homelands between 350 AD and 1000 AD. In other words, they were relatively recent immigrants, certainly long after any invasion of India took place. When the Ukrainians originally invaded the area was ...


34

Based on what you've told us, your teacher is most likely thinking of the Proto-Indo-European people (Note: I am NOT saying it is accurate to call the PIE people "Proto-Ukrainians"). According to the most mainstream theory, the Kurgan hypothesis, these speakers of the ancient Proto-Indo-European language emerged from the Pontic-Caspian steppes some 6-8,000 ...


2

Following and expanding on from Mike L's comment the short answer will be we don't know. Numbers of armies as quoted in works at or close to the time were often (always?) exaggerated, you know our guys only had 10,000 and the bad guys, they had a 100,000 and we still beat them. Camp followers and townsfolk could also get lumped into the count regardless of ...


2

If you go to an old farm, you may be surprised to find out that a lot of the metal tools in the shed have the metallic part dating back 50 or even older than that without significant degradation other than rust and some chips. The wooden parts however have long been replaced with newer material, and the edge is periodically resharpened. I wouldn't be ...


12

Anywhere between "after first serious use" and "never". Assuming thorough, regular maintenance, a sword can last almost indefinitely - the oldest one I've held that has seen use was about 250 years old and might still be usable, given a good cleaning. The oldest one that I've seen was about 1500 years old and while thoroughy rusty, was worn (indicating ...


3

I found this: http://www.etymologie.info/~e/l_/lu-gr.html Der Name des Ortes "Schengen" (im Großherzogtum Luxemburg (Kanton Remich), der Namensgeberin für das "Schengener Abkommen", engl. "Schengen Treaty", "Schengen Agreement", 1985) soll keltischen Ursprungs sein und auf kelt. "scen" = dt. "Schilfwasser" zurück gehen. Im Jahr 877 erscheint der Name des ...



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