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4

The painter was born in Vienna as Friedrich Stowasser; he and his parents were Austrians. His artistic name “Hundertwasser” does in fact represent a translation of the Slavic sto to German Hundert. According to etymologists the name Stowasser is actually a reinterpretation of the name Stabossener, from the place name Stabossen in what is now the Czech ...


1

Firstly "Hundertwasser" is German and means "Hundred water" (Friedensreich means both "rich of peace" and "realm of peace") so his name change didn't really change the meaning of that name. He was born in Vienna, which is now in Austria. Wikipedia He was born in 1928; His name suggests Czech origin so I assume that his parents were born in what now is the ...


3

Japanese cuisine and culture are very much focused on rice - I don't think you can really call anything else a staple food. However, there are a number of foodstuff that had been introduced into Japan by Europeans, and achieved varying levels of popularity. For example, base foodstuffs that have became important include: Chili pepper, introduced in 1542 - ...


1

It may not be food, but there are quite a few garden plants here on the West Coast of the US that come from Japan originally.


0

The Original question is based on a small sample of Western or partially westernized European kingdoms existing after the invention of coats of arms. Has the original questioner looked up the coats of arms of the kingdoms of: Scotland England Gwynedd & principality of Wales Mann Ireland Norway Sweden Denmark Iceland Goths Wends Portugal Galicia (in ...


2

Europe during the middle ages mainly just made use of gold that was already in circulation, because, as you said, the trade with Africa was disrupted. It didn't matter much however -economically- because the currency shifted to silver and copper in all but the byzantine empire. And both were in ample supply. As Alex already mentioned, eastern Europe had ...


2

I'll add that the Carpathian mountains in Eastern Europe have been a very rich source of gold in the middle ages and before. The Roman conquering of Dacia in 106 AD - modern day Romania is said to have revitalized the Roman empire economy and prolonged its life by at least 100 years (160 metric tons of pure gold and 300 metric tons of silver were brought to ...


7

Half the Old World's gold around the medieval period came from Mali: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mali_Empire#Economy Credit also to many many hours playing Civilisation 4 as Mansa Musa for knowing this one!


5

Life in medieval times was in the way you are asking not much different than it is now. You may want to read The Canterbury Tales by Chaucer. In many of the stories he paints a picture of day to day life in medieval England and you will see it was not too much different than things are now. To answer some of your specific points: The middle class: there ...


15

In the Greek and Roman Era there were a number of sources in Europe tapped for gold.. These were often alluvial (alluvium is loose soil or sediment, usually around water) deposits near the mouths of rivers in Lydia, Greece, Egypt, and Asia Minor. Later more standard mines were found in the Balkans. Rome found similar river deposits in North Italy, Spain, ...


1

I know that there are gold mines in Russia, Germany/France/Switzerland area, so it may have come from there source



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