Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

21

Here is one noting: The European medieval diet was largely determined by social class. For the majority of the of the people, peasants, a large portion of their daily diet was made up of grains such as wheat, rye, oats or barley(carbohydrates). The grains were boiled whole in a soup or stew, ground into flour and made into bread, or malted and brewed ...


15

England in 400BC was a broadly Celtic culture with Pictish remnants in the North; 1600 years later it had gained a lot of influence from Roman, German, French, and Norse invasions. Language, food, architecture, laws, and so on were much different. These are the obvious changes. Your middle age Englander transported to Iron Age England would perhaps guess ...


13

According to historian A. Roger Ekirch's At Day's Close, peoples in pre-industrial societies actually went to bed as soon at it was too dark to work, and slept (and still do sleep in such areas today) in two fourish-hour phases, interrupted by a short period of activity. He found numerous references to this in literature, from Medieval literature to Homer. ...


12

The largest city in Europe was Knossos in Minoan Crete, which according to Wikipedia reached as much as 100,000 people by 1600 BCE (Pendlebury & Evans 2003, p. 35). In comparison, the cities of Ur in Mesopotamia and Memphis in Egypt attained 60,000 people by 2000 BCE. The Mycenaean culture of Greece is well known to us via Greek legends. A warlike ...


11

It is a widely used epitaph of the time for beloved wives (see here and here), and seems to refer to Luke 10:38-42: (New International Version (NIV)) At the Home of Martha and Mary 38 As Jesus and his disciples were on their way, he came to a village where a woman named Martha opened her home to him. 39 She had a sister called Mary, who sat ...


9

I passed the question to Cathy Raymond. Although she does not earn her living in either history or in textiles (due, I suspect, to her preference for a non-gruel based diet), I've read her research for a couple of years, and I've come to trust her opinion. One of the reasons I place faith in her opinion is that after answering the question, she offered the ...


9

Be it known that I, WILLIAM STEBBINS BARNARD, of Canton, county of Fulton and State of Illinois, have invented a Book-Support, of which the following is a specification [of] this invention [that] relates to a support or holder for books, engravings, photographs, cards, and other things, which it is desired to stand on edge, and retain upright on ...


8

For our purposes, there are two kinds of Vikings; western, or Norwegian Vikings that settled Greenland, Iceland, and Normandy, and eastern, or Swedish Vikings who settled Russia and the Baltic region. There is a fair amount of literature on the first group of Vikings, who were called "Norsemen" (later Normans). One example is from Encyclopedia Britannica: ...


8

It certainly was condemned in the late Middle Ages. The Oxford English Dictionary has this delightful quotation, dated to circa 1450: "Pike not þi nose; & moost in especial..to-fore þi souereyn cratche ne picke þee nouȝt." In other words, "Don't pick your nose, and especially, don't scratch or pick in the presence of your sovereign."


7

First, Jesus did not live in Judea, but in the more rural and distant province of Galilee. The major population center was Sepphoris, Herod Antipas' seat of power. Historians generally agree that Jesus would have plied his trade in that city: Sepphoris... was moneyed. It was the center of trade for the area. And if Jesus were growing up in Nazareth, ...


7

After some digging I found this: "AKHIBTE has taken the house of Mashqu from Mashqu, the owner, on a lease for one year. He will pay one shekel of silver, the rent of one year. On the fifth of Tammuz he takes possession. (Then follow the names of four witnesses.) Dated the fifth of Tammuz, the year of the wall of Kar-Shamash." That's a Babylonian rental ...


6

When the chimney became popular, 12C for castles and high status buildings, 15-16century for regular houses. Without a chimney you have a central hearth and the smoke rises to vents in the eaves, so everybody who wants to be warm has to be in the large single room. Once chmineys are invented you need somewhere to build them. If you have a castle you can put ...


6

A New York bar's website is one of a few sites which provide the following (seemingly) credible explanation for this practice: No one is exactly sure of the reasons why larger format bottles were given biblical names. But, according to the Champagne expert Francois Bonal, winemakers in Bordeaux had been using the name Jeroboam for the four-bottle size ...


6

Harry Gordon Selfridge does appear to be the man responsible. From Wikipedia's page on Selfridges: Selfridge's innovative marketing led to his success. He tried to make shopping a fun adventure instead of a chore. He put merchandise on display so customers could examine it, put the highly profitable perfume counter front-and-centre on the ground floor, ...


6

Pottery (amphora), barrels, and wineskins mostly - which is why archaeologists know so much about pottery, as it is the only one of the three relatively imperishable. Paper was relatively expensive by todays standards until the early 20th century (and glass more so as only hand-blown glass was known) thus would have been used only to store relatively pricey ...


5

Monestary account records and feudal charter dues including land deeds. You might want to start with Bloch on feudalism or the encyclopaedia article on English economics in the Middle Ages. Also that previous answer of mine on urbanity in medieval periods and the lack of a market economy. How did cities operate in medieval times?


4

Check Harvard Business Review. I've bought their "IKEA and Ingvar Kamprad" and "IKEA Invades America" articles (each are about $5) which both include information regarding some of their earlier approaches to design.


4

The wiki article on Mayan Trade has a good overview of Mayan social structure. In essence: The Maya relied on a strong middle class of skilled and semi-skilled workers and artisans which produced both commodities and specialized goods. They also had a large base of slaves and serfs - agricultural specialists. Members of the nobility had specialized ...


4

Your guess is correct. Bathing in Rome was one of common daily activities. While nowdays bathing is seen as strictly private activity, bathing in Rome was public activity. Rich Romans could afford themselves bathing facilities in their villas, while other classes bathed in thermaes, public facilities for bathing, similar to nowdays spas. They were owned by ...


3

As it's been already stated, we lack good sources from medieval times that wouldn't come from people of the Church (who surely wouldn't write about such things) or traveling merchants (who didn't have enough local knowledge). This way I'll go with the source from 1543, which is a book by Mikołaj Rej, called "A Brief Discussion among Three Persons: a Lord, a ...


3

The process of wrapping purchases in paper and twine is called packaging, and the resultant wrapped item is called a package. (You will hear purchases sometimes referred to as packages in old books, TV shows and movies.) It was replaced by self-service shops and sturdy paper bags beginning in the '30s. To begin with, paper was used as flexible packaging as ...


3

To answer only part of the question: The wealth of first century carpenters is impossible to compare to highly paid workers in late capitalism. Wealth has a fundamentally different meaning in our society to that of Antiquity; and, as such, a valid comparison is impossible. It is however possible to explain wealth and poverty from the first century in ways ...


3

As Lennart said - this was done as early as Rome. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apartment#Rome The lower floors were typically occupied by either shops or wealthy families, while the upper stories were rented out to the lower classes.. Reference: Gregory S. Aldrete: "Daily Life in the Roman City: Rome, Pompeii and Ostia", 2004, ISBN ...


3

One possible source is Traditional Korean Costume Given that the authors are listed by their affiliation with Ewha's Women's University, I'm willing to bet that they have additional academic papers availble, and are probably willing to correspond on the topic and suggest other resources. I searched for the first author's name on the Ewha University site ...


3

From the same wiki article: The amphora complements the large storage container, the pithos, which makes available capacities between one-half and two and one-half tons. In contrast, the amphora holds under a half-ton, typically less than 100 pounds. The bodies of the two types have similar shapes. Where the pithos may have multiple small loops or lugs ...


2

To add another datum, from a later period but probably relevant nevertheless, Henry IV justly prided himself very much on the fact that under his administration every peasant family could afford a chicken meal every Sunday. This represented a very high living standard for peasants.


2

the "high middle ages" were a period of considerable social change and relocation of population groups. It was the growth of the cities and the establishment of a large merchant class that provided for the growth of religion. The farmer tilling his soil had better things to do than contemplate God, a merchant sitting at home at the end of a day after the ...


2

The absolutely excellent author is Fernan Braudel. I am afraid, I don't know about the quality of translation of his "Civilization and Capitalism, 15th–18th Centuries", 3 vols. (1979) English translation by Siân Reynolds. The first volume is all about how they lived what ate, what put on, how and why travelled, and everything. This book was also translated ...


2

These appeared to be the names of kings that hosted "social" events. For instance, Melchizidek threw a feast for the rescue of Lot and others by Abraham. And the names of the kings would be a reference to the sizes of the bottles used at the respective events.


2

If you prefer your Bible straight-up and neat, the that would be Tubal Cain, first artificer in metals (Genesis 4:22); if you prefer it with a grain of salt then take your pick from Imhotep (c. 2250 B.C.), Marcus Vitruvius Pollio (born c. 80-70 BC) or numerous others. Merriam-Webster Online gives the definition of Engineering as: 1: the activities or ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible