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28

Snow removal takes a lot of effort. It was easier to switch out wheeled carriages for sleighs. Sleighs work better with more snow, so that according to this article: in the 18th and 19th centuries, "snow was never a threat" to road travel, "but rather it was an asset." The more densely packed snow became, the better. Some municipalities even had ...


9

It certainly was condemned in the late Middle Ages. The Oxford English Dictionary has this delightful quotation, dated to circa 1450: "Pike not þi nose; & moost in especial..to-fore þi souereyn cratche ne picke þee nouȝt." In other words, "Don't pick your nose, and especially, don't scratch or pick in the presence of your sovereign."


8

Tyler Durden's comment does a great job with the first two parts of your question. This answer addresses when playgrounds began to look like the things we have today. Short Answer: The modern American playground was championed by progressives in the 1880s-1890s; the most common playground equipment was all invented by the 1920s; and New Deal money made ...


6

Your guess is correct. Bathing in Rome was one of common daily activities. While nowdays bathing is seen as strictly private activity, bathing in Rome was public activity. Rich Romans could afford themselves bathing facilities in their villas, while other classes bathed in thermaes, public facilities for bathing, similar to nowdays spas. They were owned by ...


5

Obviously this varies considerably by location as well as occupation and social standing - I'm afraid 'peasant' covers a wide array of people. I'm more familiar with the English diet than anything on the continent, but by far the bulk of their sustenance came in the form of pottage. Basically throw whatever green things you are currently getting from the ...


3

With a paring knife. That's why nail parings are called, well, nail parings. Also, there were nippers similar to modern yarn cutters which were in common use since Roman times. Yarn cutters look like this:


3

I am a regular stackexchange user but never in the history boards before. This post caught my eye. My Great Grandmother lived as a pioneer homesteader/farmer in Klamath Falls, Oregon. Her father died when she was very young, and her older brother badly injured his knee on a nail that worked itself loose on a horse drawn sleigh. He moved into the city to ...


3

@twoshedas answer, currently the accepted one, mentions just one approach but there were others. For example, in Montreal, Canada, large shafts that lead from the street level down to the sewers were used by city workers to push snow off the street and out of sight. From UnderMontreal A 19th century snow-dump shaft at the beginning stages of the Cote ...


2

I've seen here in UK demonstrations by U.S. cowboys of cutting into a herd with a larriot, and very effective it is. So many of the cowboy films show herds being driven at speed for miles, which is far from the truth. WE presumably are talking about domestic breeds rather than buffalo, even if they are roaming in a wild context. The stock would never get any ...


1

A general practice, even among very primitive people, is to use twigs. If you gnaw on a twig, its end will fray; then you can use the frayed end as a sort of a brush. If you ever do a lot of camping, you learn this very fast. Ancient Romans used tooth powder such as pumice or very fine sand and linen cloth. They also used various cleansers and astringents ...


1

The first verifiable mention I could find was in Theophrastus (circa 300 BC): [Lyngourion] has the power of attraction, just as amber has, and some say that it not only attracts straws and bits of wood, but also copper and iron, if the pieces are this, as Diokles used to explain. -- Theophrastus


1

The design commonly used in American cards today is derived ultimately from French decks going back to the Renaissance. The earliest common American interpretation was by an artist named John Cazenave about 1800 about whom little is known. His designs were improved and much more widely printed by Charles Bartlett circa 1830. Then, around 1850, Samuel Hart of ...


1

Kit, Regia Anglorum are the premier Early Medieval living history society in the United Kingdom. They actively research historical social and military life, and have built permanent settlements in the Norman and Anglo-Saxon style, as well as having Viking ships. See http://www.regia.org/research/history/vikings.htm and ...



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