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A few points not covered in other excellent answers: Wealthy peasants, the Kulaks, were specifically targeted by Soviet regime. Whilst these peasants were comparably wealthy and resistant to land reform - they were also the farmers most likely to be literate, skilled and possessing efficient farming infrastructure. Killing these peasants reduced the ...


0

This is a question about economics, not history. Feeding people is no easy task. The typical person can easily eat through a panel truck full of food every year. The cost of this includes not only producing the food, but transporting and distributing it. Growing food and getting it to market is hard work and the farmer will demand something in return or he ...


1

You are making a number of assumptions here which are not correct. The basic mechnanism of the pre-war famines was this: Stalin was pursuing a policy of rapid and extensive industrialization. This policy, which was not based on organic growth, necessitated the purchase on a huge scale of Western (largely American) technology and expertise. Whole factories ...


8

I think implicit in this question is an underestimation of the difficulty of feeding a nation. In a market economy, it seems to happen magically as prices coordinate labor and resources, but commanding the millions of people with disparate knowledge successfully is actually incredibly difficult. Consider the famous example of the pencil ...


2

A lot of the time it was the Soviet Union government deliberately trying to starve some of their people to get rid of the "undesirable" people. Sometimes it was because the Soviet Union government didn't know how to properly feed their people, and when they did they chose to ignore the people. The last major famine in the USSR happened mainly in 1947, ...



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