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39

These are jodhpurs, a style of pants developed primarily for horseback riding. Their intent was to allow flexibility in the hip and thigh while the more narrow lower portion worked well with riding boots and didn't get caught up in stirrups.


16

The Wikipedia article on the upturned collar is surprisingly informative and relevant. With origins predating the 20th century, the upturned or 'popped' collar was somewhat ubiquitous. Even President James Buchanan wore upturned collars: At this time, upturned collars were detachable, and were notorious for being quite uncomfortable and stiff. The ...


12

Wigs became almost instantly fashionable after Louis XIII started wearing one in 1624 to hide his baldness, and were almost universal for European upper & middle class men by the beginning of the 18th century. Their main purpose was to mask receding or graying hair, and as a fashion item. One excellent source is the very detailed diary of Samuel Pepys ...


8

I passed the question to Cathy Raymond. Although she does not earn her living in either history or in textiles (due, I suspect, to her preference for a non-gruel based diet), I've read her research for a couple of years, and I've come to trust her opinion. One of the reasons I place faith in her opinion is that after answering the question, she offered the ...


7

This kind of "is X rare" is clearly difficult, since it is usually hard to quantify things like this across space and time. @Histophile's own memories from the period and the fact that Göring's habit was singled out in a contemporary American account are suggestive that at least in US of time, this might have stood out. It doesn't tell us much about elites ...


6

Having grown up in NYC, "crossroads of the world", and lived through the mid 20th Century, I consider myself a "primary source" on such a matter. :-) : As far as that period is concerned, at least in the Western World, the answer is a resounding No - it was not less exclusively limited to women - on the contrary. A man with painted fingernails? Few things ...


5

First of all, tt was the age's fashion. But the main purpose was to cover the unhygienic hair. The general hygiene was really on a low level in Europe from the beginning of the dark ages until the end of the 19th century when people started to realize that most of the diseases can be prevented by simple methods like taking bath, washing hands, and by ...


4

Thomas Nashe's 1592 work Pierce Penilesse, His Supplication to the Divell implies a use of wigs to hide the indications of venereal disease: "Men and women that have gone under the South pole, must lay off their furde night-caps in spight of their teeth, and become yeomen of the vineger bottle: a close periwig hides al the sinnes of an olde ...


4

I've found that musketeers had large beards to store matches in, an that there is a strong link between small beards and civilization. The books Fighting Techniques of the Napoleonic Age, and, A Most Precocious Thing: Gun Trading and Native Warfare In The Early Contact Period (yes thats the title), both say that the long beards were used to store the long ...


4

Every so often in American history, we have a "girl power" movement. One appears to be happening right now, as we speak. That is, today's girls are graduating from college in greater numbers than boys, and getting better entry-level jobs. This appears to have no precedent in American or world history. This "girl power" movement is an offshoot of their ...


3

It's hard to say why fashion changes, but ruffs was originally a French fashion that spread to the various countries of Europe. They may have started as a small drawstring collars in early 1500s on the chemise to protect the upper body garment from soiling. Portrait paintings from the era gives a good illustration of the evolving fashion, from small ...


3

South India has had a vast number of kingdoms , each having its own variety and having being influenced differently from other kingdoms , in culture , custorms , religion , art , language and of course the attire of all classes of society. So it's not wise to put them in one general basket called south india. Since it is not possible to quantitatively ...


3

Being "developed" has nothing to do with how people dress (or don't). Indian society considered dress to be utalitarian rather than a means to hide the body because of some religious diktats. IMO that's highly developed, far more so than the primitive idea of letting your actions be decided by priests... Also, as a result they had no body taboos like are so ...


3

One possible source is Traditional Korean Costume Given that the authors are listed by their affiliation with Ewha's Women's University, I'm willing to bet that they have additional academic papers availble, and are probably willing to correspond on the topic and suggest other resources. I searched for the first author's name on the Ewha University site ...


3

Wearers of the Zoot suit were not really "hip" (in the usual sense of the word). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoot_suit They were mainly Latinos and African-Americans, who wore them as a protest against oppression, rather than as a cultural statement, although some elements of jazz, slang, and "lifestyle" issues accompanied them. With the onset of World ...


3

The thing that initially popularlized the popped collar in the 80's, along with many other "Preppy" fashions (eg: the sweater worn tied around the neck or waist) was The Official Preppy Handbook, which came out in 1980. I never owned a copy, but I was "that age" when it came out, so lots of people brought them to school and I thumbed through it. (I was ...


2

The reason you find wildly varied depictions of Faust is because there are quite a few versions of the Faustian legend, Goethe's being fairly recent. Here's a brief and incomplete list: Historia von D. Johann Fausten (1587), by Johann Spies, The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus (1604), by Christopher Marlowe, Das Faustbuch Des ...


2

Well, it should be pretty clear that the purpose of putting buttons (or whatever you want to call them) on a lower pants leg is to make it easier to put on and remove tall boots. In turn, tall boots as a garment are much more useful in an era of horse-borne travel and unpaved roads. If you don't make that connection, perhaps the riding crop there in the ...


1

According to the book "Generations," there are recurring periods of this sort, when American men and women seem to blur (if not switch) gender roles. The last time was when the Baby Boomers, a so-called "Idealist" generation were adolescents in the late 1960s and early 1970s. This was a time when men wore their hair long. At the same time, women dressed and ...


1

The following is just a speculation; I have nothing to collaborate it with. First please take a look at this question about wigs. It attributes the fashion of wearing wigs and powdering one's face that appeared in 16th century to the epidemic of syphilis. Notice now that the ruffs appeared roughly at the same time or slightly earlier, and they started as ...


1

Adding to the other great answers (upvoted): I once was told by some guides in an 18th century palace (read: I don't have a good source), that this also was partly a pragmatic thing. People were allowed to use their own hair to create great hair fashion. There are various reasons, why a wig might have been a much superior choice: Their own hair might not ...


1

There was a sling worn either under or over the jacket, with the scabbard of the sword attached to the low end. swords have been worn like that for millenia. Why would they change that in the last years of the use of swords? besides, it looks classy.


1

The answer appears to be the Venetian Republic was the first nation to hold masquerade balls. Wikipedia has an article on the history of masquerade Victorian Masquerade Ball confirms many of the assertions in wikipedia Samantha Peach has an article that is less well sourced


1

There is a difference in Wikipedia between "hip" and "hipster" but I suspect that would be cleared up with an edit. "Hip" means "in the know" as in part of a sub-culture. The definition of "hipster" as used in the 40's as a jazz aficionado and etceteras (as someone above has posted) would have been the use within the jazz community and there were certainly ...



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