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This is much older than the first world war. Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians 11:14 "Does not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man has long hair, it is a shame unto him?" This shows that at least in the Hebraic world in the Roman period it was expected that men have short hair.


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The First World War is often identified as a turning point in men's hair length. Prior to the war, both men and women commonly kept long hair, at least in western societies (and the Far East). This became problematic during the Great War, where armies encountered severe hygiene issues fighting in the trenches. Under the unsanitary conditions of the front, ...


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Jules-Amédée Barbey d'Aurevilly, in Du Dandysme et de Georges Brummel (The Anatomy of Dandyism, 1845) claims that French dandies of his day used to use a piece of broken glass to shave down the fabric of their coats until they were almost sheer, and might break through. If you want to believe him. I don't consider him very reliable, especially since a lined ...


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This question is quite old, but it's a subject dear to my heart, so I thought I'd provide my own take for you and anyone who happens to end up here. The most important thing to remember is that there was no "flapper movement". The fashion of the 1920s grew organically out of the fashion of the 1910s, no emphatic rebellion against past dress necessary. The ...


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Normally a sword is worn from a sash or belt worn across the shoulder, known as a baldric. The scabbard is attached to the belt by a contraption of strings and leather known as a frog. In some cases scabbards were made with eyes. In this case, only a cord is needed to hang it from the belt, or it can be hung directly on a shoulder strap. In some cases, ...



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