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5

Obviously this varies considerably by location as well as occupation and social standing - I'm afraid 'peasant' covers a wide array of people. I'm more familiar with the English diet than anything on the continent, but by far the bulk of their sustenance came in the form of pottage. Basically throw whatever green things you are currently getting from the ...


3

Rural workers at one point lived with the framer and ate at his table, food & lodgings being a large part of the wage. There was a shift to just money wages, and a bit class difference that farmers no longer would eat with their labourers. So originally the workers received payment in kind that included meat and later they had to buy the meat.


7

Good question, but the problem of an answer will be that the salt was the most important food-preservation method before fridges. So it is hard to say how much people ate, maybe a good starting point could be how much could they afford. And the answer is most probably: a commoner couldn't afford much. source: Salt 1350's, Venice Typically, Venetian ...


6

Condition of the Rapa Nui when contacted by Europeans It's fairly clear from the early European accounts that the islanders were not starving - in fact all of them speak toward the willingness of the inhabitants to trade food for manufactured goods. The ship's logs from Jacob Roggeveen's landing in 1722 state; ...in particular one who seemed to be in ...


0

This is a question about competing theories which are just that: speculative theories. So, I don't think there is any definitive answer here that is not a matter of opinion. The accounts of population are highly speculative and there is no way to know exactly how many people there at any given time. The claim by the Dutch explorer that the island had ...


4

I would say it's probably independently discovered. Since it's not a real stretch to put meat scraps together to not waste food. In fact in China, there's a 6th century agricultural manual that contained instructions for making sausages. So I think it's more plausible that the ancient Chinese discovered sausages by themselves so early in history. According ...


5

The answer is in the meat-packing industry and the development of a practical refrigerated boxcar, also known as the reefer. This permitted livestock ranched in the West to be slaughtered nearer the cattle ranges, and shipped back east with little spoilage - before, livestock were shipped live to local slaughter-houses in the East, who distributed the meat ...


6

I would say that the predominant roots of southern fried chicken was Scotch-Irish, with the "West African" part added later, almost as an afterthought. The basic idea for "southern" fried chicken is "breaded" chicken, deep-fried in flour and/or corn meal. That part is Scots Irish. One "related" example is "shortening bread" of Riley. That is bread made of ...


7

Tofu's origins are not conclusively known. The leading theory, however, is that it was invented during the Western Han Dynasty by Liu An, the king of Huai Nan. The earliest known reference to this is made in the Shiyi (a type of history book that is sort of an unofficial addendum to the official histories) written by a Liang Dynasty official, Xie Chuo ...



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