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The question is poorly stated. The Founding Fathers were not all of one mind on many subjects— the Federalists saw danger in direct democracy, whereas the Anti-Federalists did not. Additionally, popular usage of terms like "democracy" or "republic" is quite different from a political scientist's use of such terms— indeed, quite a lot of things "don't mean ...


6

I do not think that there exists evidence to show that the founding fathers anticipated a civil war would break out over the issue of slavery. The founding fathers were largely against the institution of slavery, but the southern delegates (where the economy was completely dependent upon slavery) were for the institution. There were some steps taken to ...


6

There are lengthy discussions on the topic of factions and mitigating the risks of insurrection in the Federalist Papers and in the responses written by anti-Federalists. The most notable paper on this subject was Federalist No. 10.


6

The material aspects of life for slaves at Mount Vernon--things like their quarters, clothing, food--were very similar to the way things were done on other large plantations in 18th century Virginia (places like Monticello or Sabine Hall). In the case of infants, mothers at Mount Vernon were given a new blanket at the time of the birth and baby clothes of ...


6

This touches upon a really fascinating cluster of debates in the history of the late colonial period and the early republic. There are likely many publications on this but it forms one of the central issues in: Aristide R. Zolberg A Nation by Design: Immigration Policy in the Fashioning of America I'll focus on Zolberg's take. The book opens a discussion ...


5

This was (to the best of my knowledge) a comment that Jefferson made to Madison, and I believe he was referring to revolutions, not civil wars. Jefferson was at the time strongly under the influence of the French Revolution, which he thought was a marvelous thing. Madison pushed back on Jefferson, and he recanted from the position. I regret that I can't ...


4

Yes, absolutely. The Federalist /Anti-Federalist controversy went far beyond the issues you cite. The founders feared a tyrannical central government - the writings of Jefferson, Madison and Monroe are particularly clear on this point. The 9th and 10th were designed to limit the growth of the government. Hamilton wanted a strong, effective government. ...


3

I've deferred answering this because it is a complicated subject, and I can't find the right sources. My impression is that the founding fathers didn't share a coherent opinion on the subject; different states and their respective founding fathers had different opinions. However yesterday, I heard the following paragraph read aloud He has endeavoured to ...


3

Russia's Boris Yeltsin is widely disrespected in Russia. According to the questionnaire conducted by the request of IA Regnum in Voronezh in January 2012, 56% of the participants consider that he brought more harm than good. About 31% assessed that there was about equal amount of harm and benefit, and only 9% said that he brought more benefit than evil. ...


1

Absolutely. Pauline Maier "Ratification: The People Debate the Constitution" is an excellent source for both of these questions. With respect to your first question about economic differences, consult any discussion of the Bank of the United States, the arguments between Hamilton (who argued for a commercial country) and Jefferson (who argued for a ...



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