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0

I know the cat garden in Dubrovnik has one:


7

The association with saints is probably correct. Red and blue were indeed respectively the colours of Saint Denis and Saint Martin. The early history of the French flag is lost in obscurity, and it is not always easy to trace the various modifications that it has undergone. At the earliest date of which we have record we find the kings of the Franks ...


6

Most of them were shipped back to France within the week. The Battle of France was not quite over and the Dunkirk evacuees were still French military. Most French evacuees from Dunkirk had elected to be returned to the fight; the British troops had gone home to be re-equipped. - Williams, Andrew. France, Britain and the United States in the ...


5

I have found it now here: http://www.diplomatie.gouv.fr/fr/IMG/pdf/24_Lombart.pdf (footnote 40), where someone (not Chirac himself) says that Chirac is “de ceux pour qui ‘sans l’Afrique, la France deviendrait une puissance de troisième rang’” (one of those for whom “without Africa France would become a third-rate power”). NB. "third rate" not "third world".


2

The Fashoda Incident was the culmination of Britain's North-South expansion through Africa colliding with France's East-West expansion. As Germany was increasing its dominance in Europe, England had to grab a major ally in Europe and their choices were either Germany or France. The Boer wars largely arose from Britain's mismanagement in Africa and since ...


-2

O_o Weird theory... Roman empire fell apart after Attila enter French Gaule while Alaric was destroying Italy Army. From that moment Romain kept failing to win important battle and Wisigoth freed Gaule from Roman troup until 472. It was then the beginning of a new King Clovis and the bond cut of Gaule with Roman Antique Empire. Same issue arrise in ...


7

In german history lessons (as I remember them) the main reasons are listed like this: Great Britain had a policy called "two force standard" for its military fleet, which means GB's fleet should be not only the strongest but as strong as the second and third. Germany increased military ship production in a way that threatened to make this policy ...


1

Britain tended to ally with the second strongest country on the Continent against the FIRST. This was often for balance of power reasons. For many of those "close to 1000 years," France (with the best climate and largest population in western Europe) was the strongest country, and the greatest threat to Britain, and Britain would ally with others (e.g. small ...


0

The French did attack, starting on September 7, 1939. They even gained some ground. Attacking on September 7 in reaction to the September 1 invasion of Poland is actually remarkably quick. So the question might more appropriately be could they have attacked more strongly? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saar_Offensive


20

I agree with much of Semaphore's answer, which shows that actually Britain and France were not in a state of perpetual war. But I think your question really relates to "What changed?" so I'll try to answer that. Firstly, the end of the Napoleonic era. The Battle of Waterloo and following months were the end of the Napoleonic wars, and the end of the "Big" ...


30

British policy on the continent has traditionally been to maintain the balance of power (this is also really a general European thing). This amounted to shifting alliances all over the continent. Though France and Britain are "traditional" enemies (as neighbours were wont to be in Europe), they certainly hadn't been at war for anywhere near "close to 1000 ...


0

France supported the Iranian revolution. Just before the revolution, they took khomeini to Paris in order to facilitated the revolution and guarantee his safety until his return to Iran.


3

A 2 cm Selbstfahrlafette seems most likely to be a Halftrack with a 20mm anti-aircraft gun - probably an SdKfz 7/1 or Sdkfz 10/4 though it could also have been a wheeled truck. (Fully tracked flakpanzer tanks were quite rare). Either way it would be a very unsuitable vehicle for any kind of ground engagement in the circumstances of the Falaise Pocket and ...


1

Yes, or something like it. Most accounts have him saying it to Halifax in 1940, though he possibly repeated it on other occasions. It is sometimes reported that he said "J'assume la France" rather than "Je suis la France". In either case, the expression signified his intention to assume responsibility for France. Many of the smaller countries overrun by the ...


11

What you are looking for is the Battle of the Falaise Pocket, which took place from 12-21 August 1944. Chambois seems to be the spot where the pocket was actually closed, or where the encircling Allied forces met up, which took place on 19 August. According to Wikipedia, the battle is also referred to as the Battle of the Falaise Gap, after the ...



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