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4

Considering your edit (liberation of the north-eastern border): I would say March 19th 1945 after Lauterbourg was taken back in Alsace. You may also consider the city of Saorge, at the Italian border, liberated in April 24th. But I don't think it makes so much sense to try to find a definitive day of the French liberation, because of the "pockets" which ...


19

Atlantic pockets The answer is surprisingly difficult to find on Wikipedia. I persisted in searching and finally found this: German military administration in occupied France during World War II The Liberation of France was the result of the Allied operations Overlord and Dragoon in the summer of 1944. Most of France was liberated by ...


0

According to the OP's own link, "Britain began military preparations in late 1792 and declared that war was inevitable unless France gave up its conquests, notwithstanding French assurances they would not attack Holland or annex the Low Countries." France felt that she needed the outposts that she had captured in (modern) Belgium to further her Revolution. ...


1

On one level it was an ill-adviced, emotional response to perceived provocations. Immediately prior to the declaration, relations between Britain and France had deteriorated to such a point that the French ambassador to Britain, the Marquis de Chauvelin, was expelled on 24 January 1793. his return to Paris was regarded with indignation: Chauvelin's ...


0

As mentioned by @Schwern, the treacherous conditions of the Bay of Biscay make the area difficult for even modern day shipping operations. I cite the recent trouble the car carrier Modern Express: "Winds blow from America to Europe and the waves grow all the way as they travel from west to east," says Prof Adrian New, from the National Oceanography ...


0

Remember as well that Viking raids were devastatingly common for several hundred years. Coastal towns and cities were hit especially hard in Northern Europe. This raiding dissuaded coastal settlement for several hundred years ~800-1100- the time period which saw Europe crawl out of the Dark Ages. Since there were no competent state-level actors to protect ...


1

Moreover, the aim of the coalition wars was not only to stop the revolution before and Napoleon after, but also to restore the monarchy in France, because the ideas of the revolution put at risk all the dinasty of Europe. The legitimate king of France and his supporter (mainly the nobility) were guests and allies of the members of the coalitions. An ...


2

Short answer: There are few rivers in France flowing to the Atlantic in France, and few natural harbors on the Atlantic. In the case of Bordeaux and Nantes, there are rivers that flow into inland waterways. These are technically not on the Atlantic, which is the point of part of your question. In the case of America, there are several cities that are ...


1

As French ports were well established on the channel and Mediterranean a long time before there was any real trade across the Atlantic. The French population therefore lived close to these channel and Mediterranean ports. So we then need to ask what is the benefit of a port on the Atlantic? The goods would still need to be transported to the population ...


4

Cities in the USA were built quite recently. When the first cities were being founded, the major trading partners were Europe - all located East of the East coast. Cities in France were built a long time ago. When the first cities were being founded, the French could. Travel North and meet the English. Travel East and meet Belgium, Germany, Switzerland ...


23

Bordeaux and Nantes are major cities and their proximity to the Atlantic coast was key to their development so there is nothing unusual about France in this respect, it does have some major port cities on the Atlantic coast. The question, then, is really one of local geography. Those cities are located a few tens of kilometres away from the actual ...


48

First because most cities in France are much smaller than cities in the US. Compare a list of French cities by population with the same for the US. There are 11 cities in the US bigger than the 2nd largest in France (Marseille at ~855,000) and 34 bigger than the 3rd largest (Lyon at ~500,000). Second, it does have big Atlantic coastal cities... by French ...


5

Well played sir, well played! Drake has persuaded me to offer a bad answer. This is a bad answer because I'm going to cite a set of generalizations without either the sources that I prefer or the extensive scholarship of the god king of H:SE. If you want a one sentence answer, growing communications, a broader distribution of economic power to ...


1

No, it was important because the Spanish fleet was annihilated and a substantial chunk of French ships were captured along with numerous French soldiers. In warfare simply destroying valuable assets of the enemy, like ships, has a strategic value.



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