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The issue with any treaty provision is what will you do if the side does violate it. Ideally, you would instantly spring to war. However, will your allies and your own people support this? Hitler was able to spin the 100000 man army and the limits on equipment into a straitjacket that wouldn't even let them defend themselves against their smallest ...


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In addition to hoping for a negotiated solution, the Allies are unprepared for war. Germany had been rearming for years, while the Allies thought they were playing catchup. They knew their industrial capacity was superior, though, not to mention strategic advantage on raw materials thanks to their colonies. That's why they were content to hold the line, and ...


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What exactly failed in the allied camp in 1939? Was it military intelligence? None of the above. The only question is whether the creation of the Modern State of Israel in 1948 was a meticulous Rothschild New World Order plan or the product of about 10,000 improbable chance occurrences. [9] The social cataclysmic events of two World Wars, the Holocaust and ...


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Anne of Austria was a direct descendant of King Charles V of "Austria," through her father, King Philip III of Spain. This man's paternal grandfather was Charles V of Austria, who in turn, was the grandson of Maximilian of Austria and Marie of Burgundy, on his father's side, and Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain on his mother's side. So it's just a matter of ...


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Anne was by birth an Archduchess of Austria. Around her time, the title of Archduke/Archduchess became assumed by all ruling Habsburg dynasts and their children. There's several other examples such as Joanna of Austria, or Anne's sister Maria Anna of Austria. She was also a princess of the House of Austria. Anne descends from that dynasty on both parents' ...


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That same wiki post on Anne of Austria contains this line: In spite of her birth in Spain, she was referred to as Anne of Austria because the rulers of Spain belonged to the House of Austria.[1] which answers your question.


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At the time both England and France recognized the authority of the Church. Were there any attempt at having the Pope invited to adjudicate the succession amiably? At first the pope tried to arbitrate the dispute, but it didn't go anywhere. A few years after the war began, the English King Edward III allied himself with Emperor Louis IV, who named Edward ...


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In Normandy you'll find Écrammeville, which a young GI who doesn't know French, when reading it from a half destroyed road sign, may well misread as something else. See https://www.google.nl/maps/place/%C3%89crammeville,+France/@49.5783574,-0.5407385,9z/data=!4m2!3m1!1s0x480ba721cd54f1fb:0x40c14484fbcf080?hl=en From there Rennes may well be a next station. ...


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The legal situation was not as clear as the question assumes, because neither of the reasons cited were valid at the time. While people often apply Salic Law to the dispute in 1328, this is ahistorical - Salic Law had long been defunct by then. Royal succession was not fixed in legislation, but instead shaped by customs that had evolved over the centuries. ...


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Could your place be Equemauville? Its on the coast, but not near Rennes. https://www.google.com/maps/place/%C3%89quemauville,+France/@49.403432,0.2092025,13z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x47e032e5d20e4639:0x434c62c2074eeb9



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