Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

You neglect the fact that the 'indigenous' population of France before the Great Migrations (of mainly Germanic tribes) was Gallo-Roman, and by the end of the Roman era (5th century AD), the populace spoke a dialect of Vulgar Latin, which evolved into a distinct "Gallic" Latin over the following centuries. Note however that the ancient Celtic (Gaulish) ...


8

The answer lies, I believe, in the obscure end of the Merovingian epoch and is quite hard to understand from a modern perspective seeing that the geopolitical entitles involved disappeared completely under the Carolingians (at the risk of being off-topic, I still remember fondly reading these stories as a child and not understanding a word, so foreign seemed ...


8

If one interprets this question as Why were the Merovingians so reviled at the peak of their power?, then the answer is easy: they weren't. At the peak of their power, the frankish kingdoms were the most powerful geopolitical entities in Western Europe, were recognized as such and their kings were treated accordingly. The early Carolingians reviled the ...


7

During the battle of Tours, the invading Muslim leader, Emir Abd al Rahman was killed, which represented a major setback for them. After winning the battle in 732, the Frankish leader Charles Martel followed up his victory by "cleaning out" Muslim enclaves established in southern France, meaning that they had lost the initiative. By about 750, the Ummayad ...


5

As backup for Noldorin's point, note that the (French-speaking) Normans conqured England in 1066 and made French the country's official language for centuries. This didn't really change the fact that the vast majority of Englishmen spoke only English, and still do (although with a lot of French loan-words for things mostly of concern to the upper-classes). ...


3

One important thing to keep in mind is that Religion is a marker of culture. The Goths, Franks, and Vandals converted for rather practical reasons. They had conquered territories from Rome (modern Italy, Spain, France, and North Africa) where the basal populations they were trying to rule were all Christian. They were never more than a ruling elite in these ...


1

As far as I know, for a Germanic tribe to immediatly convert to Christianity did not explicitly mean that all of the tribe members would convert, in fact, most of the time only their leaders would, and it would be enough for the parties which demanded the conversion to be satisfied: here I am clearly implying that converting to Christianity would most likely ...


1

Like other commenters wrote, the transition from Latin and Old Frankish to the Langues d'oïl was progressive but, the first text considered to be written in Old French are the Oaths of Strasbourg (842). So, even though the concepts of “French” and “France” were not defined at that time, you could say that Charles the Bald (823-877) was the first ...


1

I don't know that the Merovingians were always reviled. According to Paul Freedman, even when they were quite weak and ineffective as rulers, they still enjoyed the prestige that accrued from having "the blood of Clovis [flowing] in their veins". Clearly, Clovis at least was still revered several generations after his death. Freedman suggests that the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible