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According to the OP's own link, "Britain began military preparations in late 1792 and declared that war was inevitable unless France gave up its conquests, notwithstanding French assurances they would not attack Holland or annex the Low Countries." France felt that she needed the outposts that she had captured in (modern) Belgium to further her Revolution. ...


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On one level it was an ill-adviced, emotional response to perceived provocations. Immediately prior to the declaration, relations between Britain and France had deteriorated to such a point that the French ambassador to Britain, the Marquis de Chauvelin, was expelled on 24 January 1793. his return to Paris was regarded with indignation: Chauvelin's ...


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One ought to remember that the Church and clergy were the FIRST of France's three "Estates." The nobility was "only" second. The third was the people. In the French Revolution, the Third Estate (people) rose up against the authority of the other two. Although the most dramatic images include the execution of the king and queen, the Church was "displaced" ...


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Like most internet “quotes”, this is actually fake. But Diderot said something quite similar in his poem: “Les Éleuthéromanes” : J'en atteste les temps; j'en appelle à tout âge; Jamais au public avantage L'homme n'a franchement sacrifié ses droits; S'il osait de son cœur n'écouter que la voix, Changeant tout à coup de langage, Il nous dirait, ...


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America supported the crown of France, the Bourbons, who had provided them huge amounts of money and other support during the American Revolution. When the French revolutionaries deposed and executed the King of France, the United States refused paying any debts to France on the grounds that the money had been lent by the King and only would we repay the ...


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After and during the French Revolution, people in America were split among the decisions, especially along the party lines. One party supported it, mainly the Democratic-Republicans, and one party was against the revolution, the Federalists, so it would depend on who had more power in the congress on how they would intervene. (Source: Prentice Hall, United ...


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Freemasonry's Role in the French Revolution The role of Freemasonry both outside the Catholic Church and as it infiltrated into the Church before and during the French Revolution is pivotal. Eight popes between 1738 and 1890 have vehemently and explicitly condemned Freemasonry and its naturalistic¹ ideology; this is more than the Church has ever condemned ...


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Well played sir, well played! Drake has persuaded me to offer a bad answer. This is a bad answer because I'm going to cite a set of generalizations without either the sources that I prefer or the extensive scholarship of the god king of H:SE. If you want a one sentence answer, growing communications, a broader distribution of economic power to ...



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