Hot answers tagged

70

The answer is probably Yes, some Greeks had visited the peak around 2900 meters above the sea level. Average people who are fit can easily do it, at least from one side. But it's important to realize that they didn't expect to meet gods there. According to the Greek teaching, the divine and human spheres only overlapped but they were not identical. One ...


31

It is impossible to ascertain for sure. Eleven gods of the Greek major pantheon all lived in various named corners of the mountain. Even Zeus resided on only the second-highest of the many peaks, with the highest, Mytikas, reserved as their meeting pace.) This suggests that the ancient Greeks were familiar with the terrain of the mountain. The summit ...


26

The first ship to successfully circumnavigate the world was the Nao Victoria. It was originally part of Magellan's fleet. All of the other ships (the Trinidad, the San Antonio, Concepción and the Santiago), Ferdinand Magellan himself, and most of the sailors of the Victoria had already either been killed, or turned back before this. When the Victoria finally ...


11

There is no historical record of anyone reaching the highest peaks (Mytikas-the highest, Stefani-the most steep and difficult one to ascend) of Mt.Olympus prior to the 20th century. There is though historical evidence that ancient Greeks regularly visited the Plateu of the Muses, situated at about 2.550m, while they occasionaly climbed what is today known ...


5

You are assuming that the Ancient Greeks believed that their Gods were humanly visible, which is unlikely. Therefore, whether or not they climbed Mount Olympus, the Ancient Greeks would not have expected to visibly see their Gods. From Classical Myths by Barry B. Powell (a textbook often used in undergrad classics courses): In other myths, the setting ...


5

This is apparently quite a controversial topic, as covered in this article: The location of Yam as attested in Old Kingdom sources has been the subject of extensive debate, much of which is covered in O’Connor’s comprehensive treatise. In this thesis O’Connor argued for an Upper Nubian location, similar to the previous conclusions of Priese and ...


3

According to Khorenatsi 3, 37, that was a field of Dzirav which now is in Turkey, il Agri, in the upper reaches of Eastern Euphrates (aka Murat River). Both Khorenatsi and Buzand mention the mountain of Npat nearby. Unfortunately, I was (still) unable to find out where exactly this mountain (Npat, or Npatakan, or Nifagis, or Tapa-Sheid) is located. This ...


1

I believe that regardless to common beliefs that there are and where always human beings who want/ed to experience as much as they can/could. So even if there was no historical evidence about it, I find it very unlikely that nobody climbed mount Olympus. And I do not believe that it was the light headedness that they felt as the presence of the gods. It ...


1

The reasons probably relate to World War I. There were three cities in northern Turkey of "capital" importance: Istanbul in the northwest, Ankara in the north center and Erzurum in the northeast. Erzurum was captured by "enemies" (Russia) during World War I, and Istanbul nearly so, by the British attack on Gallipoli. Both of these cities were also ...


1

Milan, Italy, doesn't have a major waterway too. The first important river, the Ticino, is about 33,5 km and to reach it and other major bodies of water (Lake maggiore, lake of Como, Ticino River and then Po river) in the centuries has been made a lot of canals (sistema dei Navigli: naviglio grande, naviglio pavese, naviglio Martesana etc etc). But in fact ...


1

Tehran is another example, Yaz and Mashhad, Kerman, and many other examples in Iran


1

Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Is the capital and it is sitting on a totally dry land



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible