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5

Here's a zoomed-in screenshot of a map I made using Harvard's Geospatial Library. As you can see in the left, the layer I chose was "Germany State Boundaries, 1914." The little exclave in the bottom center of the screen is Achberg. If you zoom in a little more, it is labeled, but I chose to stay a little further out so you could see the other exclaves. ...


2

I can't really provide example of Polish names in Upper Silesia, but I can provide you with one example and reason for it in Sudetenland before WW2 and one funny story from one village in Northern Moravia People in Sudetenland with the wake of nationalism often changed their names to pick sides. Be it to show more pro-German or pro-Czech sentiment. There is ...


2

I have performed some research and in fact it seems it was not very common, and if it was - being an unintentional result of mistakes or to make life simpler for officers. In comments I've shown an example. One of main characters of All Quiet on the Western Front by E. Remarque (Am Westen nichts neues), being a Polish from Poznań (Posen), named Stanisław ...


1

Before the war, the province of Silesia was united. The League of Nation imposed autonomy of the Province of Upper Silesia within Prussia: It was separated from the Province of Lower Silesia which was almost exclusively German. A polish majority remained in almost all districts of the Upper Silesia province: Only the districts of Falkenberg, Neisse, ...


1

It seems that the German and Polish government, under influence of the League of Nations, decided to give protection to minorities in Silesia, and that the Polish government gave some autonomy to the region in creating a local parliament, and the same goes for the Germans. You should look into: "Richard Blanke, Orphans of Versailles: The Germans in Western ...


1

I've found one contemporary source in the university library but it seems to be extremely biased. It's a slim 30-pages brochure called "The Poles in Germany and the Germans in Poland" by one George Kurnatowski, a political science professor from Warsaw, published in 1927. Prof. Kurnatowski is strenuosly trying to show that the Poles in Germany are ...


-2

Sweden supplied war materials, especially ball bearings to both sides, why didn't Hitler declare war and cripple the Allies mechanized forces ? The day Hitler declared war on other Aryans to uphold a unworthy non Aryan ally like Japan, he wrote Germanys epitaph of doom.


1

I'm actually not sure about the premise of the question. The main safeguard isn't Constitutional in the first place, but simply the memory of people who experienced the dictatorships. As far as Constitutional guarantees go, the Grundgesetz is actually fairly weak compared with the US Constitution. The main safeguard is a separation of powers, mostly modeled ...


4

The answer is based on my talks with people of Polish origins in East Prussia and Upper Silesia and might not represent all the cases. I also do understand the answer does not cite any sources. Since about late 1944 it was clear that the territories west of Poznań and Łódź are going to be in Poland. The Allied forces which were present in Western (of 1939) ...


0

It wasn't up to the East German government to decide any more. Contrary to popular perception, it also was widely controversial within both the East and West German populations. I lived in Berlin at the time and saw it first-hand. The West Germans were concerned about the cost, and the East Germans were concerned about losing their identity, although they ...


3

In most cases it was regional. Entire towns and provinces were expelled if they were German. When you are expelling hundreds of thousands of people at once, you don't have the time to be going person by person. You just ship out the whole county. In cases where population was mixed, the name would usually indicate whether the person was German or Polish. If ...


7

In short, politics. The Flensburg Government (Doenitz's German government) wanted to surrender to the Western allies (the United States and United Kingdom) rather than the Allies as a whole, primarily because of the Soviet reputation for how they (mis)treated prisoners. To this end, Admiral Friedeburg was sent to Field Marshal Montgomery's headquarters. ...


1

Here's a great map from the book German Seed in Texas Soil: Immigrant Farmers in Nineteenth-Century Texas by Terry Jordan: Page 33, visible on Google books, discusses this map in much greater detail.



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