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Just to add another european country that calls germans completely unexpected: Latvians call germans as "vācieši" and the Germany as "Vācija". To my knowledge historians are not certain about the origin of this name in latvian. It is speculated that this is a name given to call some vikings.


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During and after the fall of Rome, northern Europe was overrun by "Germanic" tribes. But one of these ethnic German tribes, the Franks, became largely "Latinized" as a result. There were two, possibly interrelated reasons for this. The first was that they colonized (and gave their name to) the part of Europe now known as "France," which the Romans had known ...


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Dutch are Germanic people themselves and among all other Germanic languages, Dutch is closest to German. Yiddish is argubly even closer - no wonder, it is a "spin-off" from German. A sidenote: in Hungarian, mute is "néma" and "German" is "német".


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German.Stackexchange: Is there a reason why Germany (Deutschland) is called so many different things in other European languages? English.Stackexchange: Why does Germany's English name differ from its German name? History.Stackexchange: Why do some countries call Germany "Alman" too? Wikipedia: Names of Germany Because of Germany's ...


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The Wikipedia article on this is quite detailed. In short, Germany was never conquered by the Roman Empire, so several tribes maintained their identity as well as the Germanic language. On top of that, you have Germany's central location, out of all those factors the different names emerged based on mostly 5 different origins. Deutsch - from the Germanic ...


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Why Germany is known in world in a diverse way? I believe this has to do with different nature of encountering Germans when it came to other nations. Germany has a more important strategic location than France does. France is in the Western most reach of the Continent while Germany is in the center and had more dealings with Slavs in the East, Latins in ...


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Actually the border between Germanic and Romance languages never correlated closely with any political borders until modern nationalistic governments forced schooling in the national languages. And it still includes at least two multi-lingual countries, Belgium and Switzerland. People preferred to speak the language that everyone else in their area spoke ...


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The Franks were a German tribe, speaking a Germanic language. They conquered part of the Roman Empire roughly corresponding to modern-day France. However, the common folk in that area spoke Latin, and never stopped just because their ruling class was now German. Over time their Latin language drifted until it became the language we now call "French". ...


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Defense of German heritage against Romans The biggest reason for how the lands east of the Rhine retained their German identity (unlike the Gauls of modern day France who lost their Celtic identity) is the Battle of Teutoburg Forest where the Germans won a decisive victory against Roman invaders. After this battle, the Romans never seriously attempted to ...


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Britain had not been involved in the outbreak of WWI, as Britain had no alliances that could force them to enter the war. If Britain actually entered the war was not in favor of France but in favor of themselves. The main reason of Britain to enter the war was to protect their vast global empire from being affected by the war. Additionally, Britain saw the ...


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An approximation of the eastern boundary of ethnic Poland was drawn by the Curzon Line put forth by Britain's foreign secretary, George Nathaniel Curzon. Coincidentally, or otherwise, it was actually very similar to the dividing line of the Hitler-Stalin Pact of 1939. Either of these two lines were ones that Polish nationalists could legitimately claim. In ...


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According to Van Manstein and Admiral Raeder who both advised Hitler to attack Great Britain immediately after crushing France in 6 weeks "they were amazed to observe that Hitler thought Great Britain was his Ally." So that ended any attempt at formally invading Great Britain...probably the only time Nazi Germany's staff was in a hurry to attack and Hitler ...


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"The stab in the back" hypothesis came from General Ludendorff not Hitler...and was directed at the German people not any particular ethnic group per se. Hitler turned it into "the Jews" most likely out of political convenience. Not only were many Jews at the Vanguard of Marxist/Leninism thus literally invading Poland in 1920 but also there were Jews who ...


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The "Germanization" process really only got underway after the unification of Germany in 1870. That means you have a period of only 40 years in which Germany is actively trying to suppress Polish culture. And in practice it wasn't very thorough. I think you vastly underestimate the opportunity for and existence of "high-level" communication and culture in ...


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Generals Scharnhorst and Gneisenau were co-founders of the German General Staff, having been appointed by King Frederick William III after Prussia's defeat by Napoleon in 1806. They reformed the Prussian army from a small, elite, professional army, to a semi-professional "mass" army that served the country better in later fighting against Napoleon, against ...


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By the time of partition, Poles had strong cultural tradition and literature. Suppressing such language and culture is difficult or impossible. You say children were educated in German". I am sure they were educated also in Polish, even if this happened at home. Certainly there were many well educated Poles by 1918, and overwhelming majority could speak ...


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The stab in the back idea held by Hitler, retorts to the signing of the Versailles treaty. If you listen to Benjamin Freedmon who was at Versailles, he states that 129 dignitaries from the German side were Jewish and the signatories on the actual treaty were of German-Jewish descent. Hitler vowed that his work was to destroy the treaty of Versailles in its ...


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Before and during the war Germany was officially what was known as the "German Confederation", a republic of many different independent states. The loss of the war completely destroyed the confederation. What happened is that the army stopped fighting the Allies and attacked and invaded all the different principalities of Germany, which were all mutinying, ...



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