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1

Some units of the former Wehrmacht remained active, other units were newly formed for tasks such as mine-clearing and to assist the Western powers. There is an article in the German Wikipedia about those entities [link] https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alliierte_Dienstgruppen#Aufl.C3.B6sung_der_Wehrmacht_bis_1947. But the Wehrmacht itself ceased to exist with ...


1

There was no "Wehrmacht" after the war ended. There were soldiers who used to be in the Wehrmacht still alive, but that does not mean that the Wehrmacht as an organization still existed. None of these survivors "remained active" in any military sense of the word. As far as Norway is concerned, the Norwegians rapidly arrested and imprisoned all the foreign ...


0

There were several factors, the most basic of which was the relaxation of trade barriers. The ability to freely travel and communicate within the empire greatly boosted economic and intellectual exchanges. Inventors could suddenly get parts and materials from places that were formerly unknown or inaccessible. Printers and publishers could have customs-free ...


3

As an addendum to @Relaxed's answer, it's worthwhile to point out that Austria actually tried (twice) to annex Bavaria in the late 18th century. These attempts were frustrated by other European powers, chiefly Prussia who actually went to war with Austria over it, the so-called Potato War. Curiously, the only gain that Austria made at the settlement of this ...


2

The Austro-Hungarian Empire was a polyglot nation of Germans (Oesterreich or "Austria" is German for Eastern Reich), Hungarians, Czechs, Slavs, etc. To Hitler and some other German Austrians, the only part of the country worth mentioning was "Austria," the German part. In his own mind, Hitler was "German" first, and only "Austrian" second. As the German ...


3

In the case of Prussia, there is a rather original institution that was created specifically to handle (a small part) of its “inheritance”: the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation. Legally, it's a foundation created by a federal law, with funding from the federal state and the federated states. Beyond that, property would not seem to be especially ...


6

@Relaxed is right to point out that Germany was unified under Prussian, not Austrian hegemony. Prussia’s 1866 military victory over Austria at Koeniggraetz definitively shut out the Austrians. Subsequently, the 1870 war between Prussia and France, with many of the remaining German states outside Austria joining in, led to William I of Prussian being ...


7

At the time nation-states (and in particular France) consolidated themselves, the governance of the German-speaking parts of Europe was based on an older model, small principalities loosely associated in large empires. Consequently, many German thinkers developed a view of the nation as a bound based on ethnicity and, in particular, language and transcending ...


8

Hitler's ultimate motive was 'Upliftment of the Aryan Race'. For this an auxillary goal was making the 'pure' German Nationality walk tall, and be strong. Hitler was not a exactly a German nationalist, he was a Pan German, strifing for uniting the German race. This essentially opposed the rise of sub - nationalism among various states of German ...


1

Hitler never liked Austria or the Austrians. He tried enlisting in the Austrian army but they wouldn't let him, before that he applied twice for the academy of arts and against he was declined entry. That's was when he left for Germany and enlisted there in the army. Mainly he didn't like Austria for the above reasons and because of the government.


2

The new Republic of Austria, the German-speaking rump of was left of much larger entity after World War I, was legally prevented from reunification with Germany. Hitler was one of those who opposed the ban, and his committed atrocities in World War II were such that unification can no longer be mentioned in polite society even by today. Yet at the time the ...


2

Until the 1800s Germany was divided into many different countries. When the concept of nation states was developing, the general idea was people who spoke the same languages was the same nation. By some historical accident Austria was excluded when most of them formed united Germany, but it's people were still considerd Germans. The idea of a separate ...


0

My understanding is that the former government of Poland, the second Polish Republic, never formally declared war on the National Socialist Republic of Germany, and it was a de facto war. The People's Republic of Poland was not reconstituted until 1952. By that time the Third Reich was long gone and there was nothing to declare war on. Note that the former ...


0

A peace treaty with just Poland really makes little sense; it would have had to be a peace treaty with the Soviet Union (and the US, Britain and France) as well. Until 1990, West Germany would not have considered a peace treaty because it would mean permanently ceding East Germany. The Germans preferred to have the formal status of occupied country. After ...


1

The main reason may simply be that there doesn't need to be a speed limit, and that there never was a compelling reason to implement one. For the most part, freeway speeds are self-regulating. Secondly, it is simply not true that there is no speed limit on the freeway. There is no general speed limit, but most stretches of the Autobahn do have individual ...


4

I'll try and address your questions separately. Source is mostly personal experience; I used to live in the city-state of Bremen, as well as in the capital of former Prussia, Berlin. You also didn't mention which time period you are talking about; some things have changed dramatically over the centuries. Some things also were different in different parts of ...


22

As CsBalazsHungary correctly points out, this was a legacy of Germany's roots as the Holy Roman Empire. As is well known, the Empire remained highly decentralised and fragmented pretty much right up till its demise. Due to the feudalistic nature of the land holding, centuries of inheritances, sales/purchases, and swaps led to extremely irregular borders ...


6

The statement in your second paragraph is a piece of neo-Nazi antisemitic propaganda, which is taken from a Nazi web site. It is improper to call these people "economists". The economic conditions in Germany indeed improved at the time of Hitler in comparison with what they were before. But this has nothing to to with "removal of Jews" or abolition of ...


3

I did not watch the movie on the linked web site, so I have no idea what the exact claims are, but I will comment on the alleged "economic miracle" of Nazi Germany from a historical point of view: At the time the economic events in Germany were popularly considered an economic rejuvenation and Hitler was credited with restoring the economy of Germany. ...



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