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2

The Fashoda Incident was the culmination of Britain's North-South expansion through Africa colliding with France's East-West expansion. As Germany was increasing its dominance in Europe, England had to grab a major ally in Europe and their choices were either Germany or France. The Boer wars largely arose from Britain's mismanagement in Africa and since ...


-2

O_o Weird theory... Roman empire fell apart after Attila enter French Gaule while Alaric was destroying Italy Army. From that moment Romain kept failing to win important battle and Wisigoth freed Gaule from Roman troup until 472. It was then the beginning of a new King Clovis and the bond cut of Gaule with Roman Antique Empire. Same issue arrise in ...


7

In german history lessons (as I remember them) the main reasons are listed like this: Great Britain had a policy called "two force standard" for its military fleet, which means GB's fleet should be not only the strongest but as strong as the second and third. Germany increased military ship production in a way that threatened to make this policy ...


1

Britain tended to ally with the second strongest country on the Continent against the FIRST. This was often for balance of power reasons. For many of those "close to 1000 years," France (with the best climate and largest population in western Europe) was the strongest country, and the greatest threat to Britain, and Britain would ally with others (e.g. small ...


20

I agree with much of Semaphore's answer, which shows that actually Britain and France were not in a state of perpetual war. But I think your question really relates to "What changed?" so I'll try to answer that. Firstly, the end of the Napoleonic era. The Battle of Waterloo and following months were the end of the Napoleonic wars, and the end of the "Big" ...


30

British policy on the continent has traditionally been to maintain the balance of power (this is also really a general European thing). This amounted to shifting alliances all over the continent. Though France and Britain are "traditional" enemies (as neighbours were wont to be in Europe), they certainly hadn't been at war for anywhere near "close to 1000 ...


3

France was the (potential) ally most immediately at hand. Piedmont had been allied with France (and England) in the Crimean War against Russia, and while England could not provide immediate help, France could. With the benefit of hindsight, one could see that Prussia would have made a more reliable ally in 1866. But Prussia and Austria were allies as late ...


3

I recommend that anyone interested in this issue read Adam Tooze's "Wages of Destruction". This book is on the economic aspects of the 3rd Riech, from the economic history before the 3rd Reich, to how it conducted the war. But the book also engages in other aspects of German conduct of the war, including tactical and strategic reasons for this and that. ...


2

Now that the smart folks here have figured out what this is about, I was able to google a contemporary (!!) English sumamry of the case (written in 1794 so it does not take later developments into account, naturally): here. Another contemporary source which refers to the case, if rather tangentially, is the early (if not first ever) conspiracy theorist ...


4

LS means "locus sigilli", "place for the seal". (Overlap with the excellent answer by tohuwawohu.)


13

This is a very little part of an extensive legal dispute regarding the regency of Friedrich Karl zu Wied-Neuwied. The complete title is „Unterthänigste Berichte der Fürstlich Wied-Neuwiedischen Regierung an die regierenden Herrn Fürsten zu Wied-Runkel und Wittgenstein-Berleburg. Das von den Wied-Neuwiedischen Landes-Unterthanen, einer hohen Reichsversammlung ...


8

Copia. Anl. Litl A. In Gemäßheit eines aus Sr. königlichen Majestät von Preussen meines allergnädigsten Herrn Departement der auswärtigen Angelegenheiten an mich ergangen allerhöchsten Befehls, wird dem Joh. Wilh. Saußer, Joh. Wilh. Schulz, Phillip Saußer, Wilh. Hayn und Joh. Wilh. Krumscheid hiermit alles Ernstes bedeutet, daß sie sich ...


2

If we look at WWII from the point of view of resources, we can somewhat justify Hitler's move of invading the Soviet Union even while being engaged in war with the United Kingdom. Invading the Soviet Union was part of the Hunger Plan. Hitler was always demanding 'lesenbraum' or living space. In this context, greater living space meant bringing more land ...



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