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12

This is a wide-ranging question that perhaps permits many answers, e.g. of both linguistic and political kinds. Sometimes renaming a town was a way of exerting a (outside) ruler's power: e.g. what was once Königsberg is now Kaliningrad, what was once Vindobona is now Wien (Vienna). Notice that it's not always straightforward to determine what the "right" ...


9

At the time Europe used to be called Christianity. Most if not all monarchies ruled by divine right. All names were officially in Latin so each country translated it in its own vernacular language, even if some names had obviously no Latin origin (Karl, Otto, etc) : Franciscus =>> François / Francis / Franz/ Francisco Carolus =>> Charles / Charles / ...


9

Omar occurs also in the bible Genesis 36:11 The sons of Eliphaz: Teman, Omar, Zepho, Gatam and Kenaz. Genesis 36:15: These were the chiefs among Esau's descendants: The sons of Eliphaz the firstborn of Esau: Chiefs Teman, Omar, Zepho, Kenaz, Chronicles 1:36 - same as Genesis 36:11 The sons of Eliphaz: Teman, Omar, Zepho, Gatam and Kenaz;


7

In this web posting by Charles Kent Smith, former president of the American Names Society, he claims the popularity of Omar as the name of Americans in the 19th century (as in Omar Bradley) is due to the popularity of poems like the Rubaiyat. They are named after the famed poet Omar Khayyam, much the same way the names Homer or Milton or Virgil came into ...


5

In Russian there is a similar convention. For example, we refer English monarchs by German-like names. I think the origin of this convention is pragmatism. Many monarchs changed their country by marriage. Some monarchs were sovereigns of two or more countries with different language. As such it is difficult to define the "true" ethnicity of many monarchs ...


4

Probably has much to do with phonetics, and of course in case of different alphabets errors in transliteration. So Karel in Dutch becomes Karl in German, Charles in French and English, Carlos in Spanish. Nothing to do with them being royals, it happens with all names (and other words). I never give my actual first name to foreigners who don't speak my ...


3

Each language has its own set of sounds and a writing system to accompany them. When words or names from a different language are introduced, they often have to be altered in order to fit into the existing set of sounds of the language. This happens even with personal names. The tennis star from Serbia is named Novak Đoković in his native Serbian, but in ...


3

In my opinion the reason is that all Europe (except Turkey and some other minor Balkan areas) is influenced by Christianity. This religion was for many years the most common factor of all European people, never mind if it was Catholic, Orthodox or Protestant. Because all Europeans were joined by this common faith, they shared the same God, the same ...


2

One reason (and there are many other reasons, as pointed out by the other answers here) is that the same name can be pronounced differently in different languages, so what look like different names (e.g. Roma/Rome, Wien/Vienna) are really just different ways of pronouncing the same name. To illustrate with a different set of examples, consider Korea, ...


1

A possible explanation is that he simply received the name of the saint on whose day he was baptized. That would be 11 April in this case. Wikipedia says he traveled to the mission on September 24 and was baptized "soon". Can "soon" refer to a six-month period? I don't know. Or maybe the fathers at the mission just had a soft spot for St. Stanislaw for ...



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