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70

The answer is probably Yes, some Greeks had visited the peak around 2900 meters above the sea level. Average people who are fit can easily do it, at least from one side. But it's important to realize that they didn't expect to meet gods there. According to the Greek teaching, the divine and human spheres only overlapped but they were not identical. One ...


31

It is impossible to ascertain for sure. Eleven gods of the Greek major pantheon all lived in various named corners of the mountain. Even Zeus resided on only the second-highest of the many peaks, with the highest, Mytikas, reserved as their meeting pace.) This suggests that the ancient Greeks were familiar with the terrain of the mountain. The summit ...


18

By definition, a historian is a scientist. Herodotus is generally considered the "father of history" and he distinguishes myths from historical facts, or at least tries to. At least the gods to not interfere in his history directly (except by pronouncements of the oracles which in his and in the later Greek accounts are always relevant, but this is not ...


11

There is no historical record of anyone reaching the highest peaks (Mytikas-the highest, Stefani-the most steep and difficult one to ascend) of Mt.Olympus prior to the 20th century. There is though historical evidence that ancient Greeks regularly visited the Plateu of the Muses, situated at about 2.550m, while they occasionaly climbed what is today known ...


9

Yes, they did. At the very least Pausanias in "Description of Greece" VI, 20, 1 mentions sacrifice for Cronus done once a year on the head of a mountain Elathion in Elis. Sorry, I can't find a reference for English translation of this excerpt. Talking about Rhea, the late cult of Rhea-Cybele is widely known. UPD. Pausanias "Description of Greece" I, 18, 7 ...


7

Based on my answer on the Mythology stack... There used to be a theory that the Titans were actually the gods of the inhabitants of (geographical) Greece before the Greeks invaded and took it over. The idea there is that the story of Titanomachy is actually an allegory for the Greek takeover of their modern homeland. This theory was popular enough back ...


5

You are assuming that the Ancient Greeks believed that their Gods were humanly visible, which is unlikely. Therefore, whether or not they climbed Mount Olympus, the Ancient Greeks would not have expected to visibly see their Gods. From Classical Myths by Barry B. Powell (a textbook often used in undergrad classics courses): In other myths, the setting ...


5

The man in the top right corner is Philip II of Macedon. According to legend, Zeus took to the serpent form and seduced and had coitus with his wife Olimpias and fathered Alexander the Great (or Alessandro Magno in Italian). This is why Zeus is shown in the half serpent form. The legend also says that Philip caught a glimpse of this and hence one day would ...


4

The Wikipedia page of "oracular statements from Delphi" lists a few accounts that might apply here. One example could be the Oracle of Delphi's counsel to Philip of Macedonia. He was told, "With silver spears you may conquer the world." The straightforward reading would be to make a whole bunch of spears made of silver and go to war. But Philip wisely ...


4

To answer your immediate question, the sarcophagus would have been for a wealthy Roman. In the case of the Genzano sarcophagus you cite, like many similar ones, the name of the deceased is unknown. During the high Imperial period of Rome, 200-400 A.D., sarcophagi such as these were popular. They were often decorated in high relief and contained mythological ...


4

Poseidon is associated with dolphins. There are also stories of him having various sexual encounters with a large number of other humans and gods. These do include rapes and also transformations into other animals. However, I don't find an exact match for your line. I did however find that Melantho, Daughter of Deucalion, was raped by Neptune as a dolphin. ...


3

To speak to the first question: we are usually led a bit astray by the term "myth," by which we tend to mean a story somewhat akin to a fable that is (to us) obviously not true. To the Greeks, "myth" just mean "story" or "plot." Their religion was in part made up of a lot of stories, but so is every religion. That doesn't mean they didn't believe them or ...


2

The god in question is Dionysus (or Bacchus, if you're from Rome), god of the grape harvest and wine, among other things. The geographical origins of Dionysus are Greek. From the Mycenaean Linear B tablets, we know that a "DI-WO-NI-SO-JO" was known (at least) in Pylos before 1200 B.C. (source) Homer's relative neglect of Dionysus, coupled with the ...


2

Description English: Herma representing Herakles with a cornucopia. Pentelic marble, Roman artwork from the 2nd century BC after a Greek original of the 5th century. The worn surface of the statue is the result from long exposure to the elements. http://books.google.com/books?id=ff51JeXhHXUC&pg=PA423&lpg=PA423&dq=heracles+cornucopia+vase&...


2

Yes they did. There are specific instances of historians or philosophers being ostracized for criticizing not even the existence of the gods, but just the powers of the gods. An example illustrating their literal belief is that when Tiberius found out that the god Pan had "died", he had an investigation launched as to the cause of his death. Christians ...


1

I believe that regardless to common beliefs that there are and where always human beings who want/ed to experience as much as they can/could. So even if there was no historical evidence about it, I find it very unlikely that nobody climbed mount Olympus. And I do not believe that it was the light headedness that they felt as the presence of the gods. It ...



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