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7

Definitely, Crimea (Chersonesos) or some place in its surrounding. Crimea's south coast was part of Roman Empire in 47 BC - 330 AD, and also a part of the Byzantine Empire later.


6

There is no easy answer to this question. There tended to be a wide variation in styles and approaches to writing. For example, if you look at just the examples in "Studies in fifth century Attic epigraphy" by Donald Bradeen, you will see a range of styles and that is just one place and time. As a rule writing was most often continuous. I see that in the ...


6

This is the most prominent of the inscriptions on the Grand Colonnade in Palmyra. It is a bilingual inscription dedicating the column in Greek and Palmyrene. The Greek portion of the inscription is as follows: ΗΒΟΥΛΗΚΑΙΟΔΗΜΟΣ ΙΟΥΛΙΟΝΑΥΡΗΛΙΟΝΖΗΝΟΒΙΟΝ ΤΟΥΚΑΙΖΑΒΔΙΛΑΝΔΙϚΜΑΛ ΧΟΥΤΟΥΝΑΣΣΟΥΜΟΥΣΤΡΑΤΗ ΓΗΣΑΝΤΑΕΝΕΠΙΔΗΜΙΑΘΕΟΥ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥΚΑΙΥΠΗΝΡΕΤΗ ...


4

The town of Novigrad may be the most northern town of Greek origin. Reputedly it was originally founded by the Greeks as Neapolis (new city).


4

About 10,000 ancient texts survive, which would require around 4-8 m2 of floor space stacked 1.8m high. The texts would be primarily from the Roman and Greek periods. http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2009/10/26/reference-for-the-claim-that-only-1-of-ancient-literature-survives/ According to Gerstinger (1948) p.10, about 2000 Greek authors were known ...


3

Knowledge of Greek was rare until the Renaissance. Scholars fleeing the fall of Constantinople brought to Italy their knowledge of Classical Greek, a good bit different from the popular Greek. In fact, through most of the Middle Ages, anyone knowing Greek was assumed to be Irish, and one of their better scholars at that. The habit of making younger sons ...


3

This Map of Greek Colonies in the Adriatic shows that the most northerly posts were Pharos and Issos halfway up the coast. These were secondary settlements from Syracuse and Ionian cities, though. If you eliminate those you are down in Albania.


2

I'll try with an answer as well, trying to be Solomonic between @Tyler Durden and @fdb. TL;DR: Yes, it's a coincidence. As @Peter Diehr lists from Behind the Name entry for Diokles the meaning is given as Given Name DIOKLES GENDER: Masculine USAGE: Ancient Greek OTHER SCRIPTS: Διοκλης (Ancient Greek) Meaning & History Means "...


2

It is a Latin derivative of the Greek name Dioklēs, which is from dio- (the compositional stem of the divine name Zeus), plus –klēs (“fame”). So it means “with fame from Zeus”. It has nothing to do with di- “two”. Reference: Beekes, Etymological dictionary of Greek.


2

I think Mustang's estimate is a gross overestimate. We are talking about surviving books. Loeb Classical Library has a stated goal to publish everything that survived from ancient Greece and Rome. Of course this is far from everything. They do not publish much of mathematics, astronomy, astrology and other special disciplines. (But this is not much in terms ...


2

From the "New Pauly", Brill 2015: Daktylos (162 words) Article Table of Contents [1] Measure of length [2] see Metrics (δάκτυλος; dáktylos). [1] Measure of length The daktylos, Latin digitus, as a measure, is the term for the fingers' width, with four dáktyloi constituting a palm (παλαιστή; palaistḗ, Latin palmus), 16 daktyloi a foot (πούς; poús, Latin ...


2

The daxtylos is based, like much of early Greek science, on Egyptian standards. A finger is the distance between the tip of index finger and the crease of the first joint. In most people, this distance is close to one inch. A palm is 4 fingers. A hand is 5 fingers. So, to answer your exact question: it is the index finger's first joint. You can find a ...



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