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19

In short: no. Culturally, the Vikings are well-documented to be part of the Norse culture of the Dark Ages, which in turn is clearly descended from an earlier common Germanic culture. Linguistically, the Vikings spoke Old Norse, which is part of the North Germanic branch of Indo-European. The Israelites spoke Ancient Hebrew, which is part of the Semitic ...


10

Yes, the Samaritans are Israelites. Samaria, the Samaritan kingdom, is in this context the Kingdom of Israel, i.e. the northern part of the Biblical United Kingdom of David and Solomon. The Samaritans, and other Jewish groups living in the Kingdom of Israel are listed as Israelites and descendants of Abraham in the Bible. However, here is the Judean ...


9

Aramaic was the language of the Assyrian Elite, around 700 BC they invaded Judea and displaced Hebrew as the language of the everyday people. Further damage was done by the Babylonian invasions. This topic is thoroughly discussed in Empires of the Word by Nicholas Ostler.


5

In Jewish tradition, the Lost Tribes are not "lost" in the sense that your car keys might get lost. They are "lost" in the sense that a dead friend is "lost". What happened was that after Israel split into two countries, the Assyrians invaded the northern one in 740 BC and carted off the balance of the population (after the war) to Assyria as slaves. This ...


4

The first mention of Israel anywhere is in the stele of the Egyptian pharaoh Merneptah c. 1209 BCE, where it says "Israel is laid waste and his seed is no more". In other words Merneptah claims to have crushed the Israeli nation so badly that it can't rise again. This is in fact the only mention of Israel in any Egyptian records. The reason is that Egypt ...


3

This question is based on an "unforced error", due perhaps to a poor translation of Scripture1: Here is the relevant text from the Book of Ezra, Chapter 4, as I have translated it directly from the biblical Hebrew, which I know fluently, along with the help of some of the classical commentators and reliable modern translations to smooth the language: ...


2

The Jewish diaspora did manage to make its way to some fairly far off lands - India, Ethiopia, Spain... there is a written historical record, and also strong archaeological evidence to document their migration to these places. Unfortunately, there is no such record or body of evidence to support Scandinavia as one of those far off lands. 15th century ...



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