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23

Although I can't answer for heraldry, there were a number of factors that influenced the red colour of English, then British military uniforms. During the 16th to early 20th centuries, primary colours and red especially helped to blur soldiers together, so that the enemy from a distance found it difficult to distinguish numbers and individuals accurately. ...


12

Modern practice is this, according to An Heraldic Alphabet (p. 231, 1996 edition) by former Clarenceux King of Arms, J.P. Brooke-Little: (edited to add -- this was a new addition to the 1996 edition, mentioned as a change in the heraldic laws.) "...If a woman entitled to arms marries a man who does not have arms, she may continue to use her maiden ...


8

According to Niall Ferguson in The Ascent of Money, they aren't balls, but coins. (I listened to the audiobook so I can't provide a page citation.) I'm somewhat suspicious because the blazon for the arms is "augmented coat of arms of the Medici, Or, five balls in orle gules, in chief a larger one of the arms of France (viz. Azure, three fleurs-de-lis ...


7

They are two lions argent supporting the Royal Arms which also sports a lion. That said, Edward IV's list of approved badges includes a Wolf argent (of Mortimer). His grandmother was Anne de Mortimer.


7

The square and spear are emblems of St. Thomas, the Apostle, aka Doubting Thomas. He was well known as a builder in his lifetime, though I have my doubts that he participated in all the constructions listed on the site linked to above. This explains the builder's square in the emblem. St. Thomas was stabbed to death by the spear represented in the emblem, ...


6

First, I am assuming that you are giving your fantasy world a "Western European" flavour. Working from this assumption there are still a myriad details that vary from nation to nation within Western Europe, but in general the two houses are allied, but the offspring only marshall the coat of arms; the husband and wife are each only entitled to their own ...


6

They don't all seem to be the same lion. Spain and Denmark's lions aren't even yellow. This is another rendering of the Coat of Arms of Sweden: Compare it with the Coat of Arms of the Netherlands. Notice the similarities between the lions. Much of the similarities between these different lions could be because the same artist drew them. By this, I do not ...


6

European monarchies are extremely intertwined, all European dynasties are related to each other, it's not surprising that they use very similar symbols. For example, take a look at the family tree of the German monarchs: Looking at that royal mess, and considering the hereditary nature of heraldry, I think it's quite obvious how we ended up with only two ...


5

Ordinary soldiers did not wear emblems or colors. Units had pennants or flags. Knights might have an emblem, but that would normally be the house of the knight, not anyone else. Here is a picture illustrating a battle from the 100 Years War. As you can see they use flags and pennants:


5

During the preparation of the royal wedding between The Royal Heiress to the Swedish throne and a commoner, people talked about heraldry and the possibility that a new royal house will emerge. But this changed when The Royal Household afirmed that the commener Westling will change and add his surname into The Royal Family name.


5

So your fantasy is about about a common man obtaining a title by marrying into a noble family? To my best knowledge the chances of this happening are slim. What is more likely is that the woman (or at least her children) will lose her title. As cases in points in recent history, consider Alfonso Díez Carabantes (the third husband of the Duchess of Alba and ...


5

My guess is that they were meant to be service flags. These were usually rectangular flags with a wide red rectangular border and a white middle area. In the middle area, a person would place a number of stars indicating the number of loved ones you had serving (blue star for serving, gold for killed). For a public (non family) display of such a flag, ...


5

In short, it's a Christian symbol loaded with meaning, and the symbol of the Lion representing royalty [goes back even further than that.] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lion_(heraldry)#Long_history_of_lion_imagery) 1) It's representative of God, indicating that God is King, and also emblematic of heavenly favor for the monarchy. 2) The lion was considered ...


4

I cannot say definitively, but there is strong circumstantial evidence supporting the notion that the symbols pointed out on the flag in question could indeed be the result of Afghan - Soviet ties, regardless of the reasons publicly stated for the use of some of the symbols, for example: The new seal shows the sun rising over two snow-capped mountains, ...


3

There have been a number of great answers, but I would add one other reason. The Patron Saint of England is St George, whose colours are a red cross on a white background (still the flag of England today). What better colours to wear into battle than those of your patron saint who fought a dragon and won!?


3

One thing that really struck me researching this was the resemblance to the Coat of Arms for Moldavia during the Soviet Era. Here they are side-by-side. The only real difference is the replacement of the Soviet hammer-and-sickle with a background of mountains (quite reasonable for a mountainous country not part of the USSR), and some minor stylistic ...


3

It is apparently a flag derived from a generic honors emblem: For comparison, look at these Canadian Victory Loan Flags and those Australian Honour Flags. There are also a similar items (e.g. WWI sons town flag) for sale on eBay. The designs were apparently all used for public fund raising by the allied powers during WW I and they share the same generic ...


3

I am only guessing, but I would imagine that part of the popularity of the attitude of lions rampant (so once you allow for the relatively obvious reasons for choosing a lion as opposed to some other animal) might just be that it fits a shield or the breastpiece of a tabard nicely. All the other attitudes (except salient, maybe) are less optimised to the ...


3

In one unusual circumstance, when the Count von Bohlen married Bertha Krupp (of the Krupp arms house), the man (von Bohlen) was asked by the Kaiser to add his wife's surname, Krupp, to his own. They became the Krupp von Bohlnens. This was true, even though as a member of the nobility, von Bohlen technically outranked his (commoner) wife. But the name ...


3

The following quotes, from English Medieval Knight 1400-1500 By Christopher Gravett on Google Books, states that retained Men-At-Arms would have worn their lords colours. Great lords employed knights and men-at-arms in private retinues, indeed sometimes so many that they formed private armies. Under this system of ‘livery and maintenance’, the ...


2

Englishmen, as well as their Gascon allies wore the red St George's cross stitched over; front and back so as to distinguish each other. Anyone found 'posing' with one who wasn't one of them scored a death sentence. It was an ordinance given by Richard II that every member of the army, lord and archer must wear it over their armour/clothing. Sources: ...


2

The answer depends on the country and the era. You've limited the question to England, and implicitly to the pre-modern period. The best resource is probably DeBrett's, but it isn't terse, it isn't easy to use, and it isn't free. I'm going to summarize with broad generalizations. Titled nobles are armigerous (have the right to arms). A given Noble may ...


2

The Catherine of Taranto article you mention refers to the Orsini article, which shows the Orsini coat of arms: See the references and links at the bottom of the page. Rely on the sources rather than Wikipedia in this case. Update: This article on François Guillaume de Castelnau de Clermont-Lodève, Archbishop of Narbonne, appears relevant. He was born ...


2

No, not significantly The wreath goes back to 1901, and the sun rising over the mountains is supposed to represent a new beginning for Afghanistan. That leaves the possibility that the five-pointed star was influenced by USSR, but five-point stars are not unique to communists, so probably not. Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emblem_of_Afghanistan ...


2

The Order of the White Eagle was ordained by King Władysław (Vladistas) in 1325, instituted on the occasion of his son Casimir's marriage. Ensign: a white eagle, crowned. To this order belonged both noble Poles and Russians [Lexicon Tetraglotton (1660)]. In 1705, Augustus, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland, revived the order. From 1705, many important ...


2

There was no Irish tricolour in the First World War as Ireland did not achieve independence until 1922. P Pappa is an innovation in the international phonetic alphabet. It used to be P Peter. That flag is the Blue Peter. It is hoisted by ships in harbour and it signifies "We are about to sail." So, in this context, it means "The Yanks are coming."


2

In an age of smoky battlefields and inaccurate muskets it is often more important for your own leaders to be able to find the right units than to 'hide' from the enemy. Thus the bright colored uniforms. You needed mass fire to keep cavalry away and beat down the other side's units and you needed to stand to reload. So infantry wasn't behind any cover. ...


1

Red is considered a Royal color (that and blue are the main colors) they can be found in almost every coat-of-arms. Red wasn't adapted until fabrics were used during the crusades (12th century). Red and blue appeared on the same standards and robes because they compliment each other. When the french decided to use Blue as their main color the British ...



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