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The OP is making a mountain out of a molehill. Up until recent centuries, it was common (in English at least) to use the heraldic colors when describing coats of arms and flags. Polish heraldry and vexilology might use ordinary modern Polish words for colors, but English heraldry uses special heraldic words. Thus in English the Polish eagle wasn't white or ...


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The official site of the city of Liège states that The letters L and G on the coat-of-arms correspond to the Latin expression "Libertas Gentis", which means "Freedom to the People". Interestingly, the French Wikipedia article about perrons says that originally the letters were added to distinguish the coat-of-arms of Liège from that of Saint-Trond, ...


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It would appear that it is a shortening of Liege to LG. According to the Heraldry Wiki page for it, the word Liege originally appeared either side of the perron: Ever since the perron, including the base with the three lions, has been the arms of the city. The actual shape, however has varied widely during the centuries, and similarly, not all images ...


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The bald eagle was not chosen to be the national bird of the United States. It as chosen to be the supporter of the coat of arms of the United States of America when the great seal was adopted. The reason why the bald eagle was chosen to be the supporter in the achievement of arms of the United States of America when the great seal of the United States was ...


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Technical note: A symbol IN a coat of arms is always within a field of a specific color that has a obvious edge or border. The field may be a shield or a roundel or a cartouche or a flag or a medieval surcoat (thus the phrase "coat of arms"). In this case the shield is divided into four quarters, and the second and third quarters are red, with three gold ...


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It is not exactly true that each nation has one national flag. Famed vexilogist (flag researcher) Dr. Whitney Smith divided the uses of a national flag into six subcategories. Flags used on land and ensigns used at sea, and three categories for each: national (used by ordinary civilians), state (used by the government) and war (used by the military - and ...



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