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3

See Infection, Contagion, and Public Health in Late Medieval and Early Modern German Imperial Towns, by Annemarie Kinzelbach, published in Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 61.3 (2006) 369-389 Abstract: From today's point of view, the concepts of "miasma" and "contagion" appear to be two mutually exclusive perceptions of the spread of ...


9

The Germ Theory of disease of course had not yet been developed at that time. It had to wait until the second half of the 19th century to get any scientific traction, and until a couple of decades into the 20th (when it saved the US's Panama Canal effort) before it became generally accepted. The typical theory before then was that diseases were caused by ...


2

I like @Semaphore 's answer above. I'd like to clarify a little: What kind of history are you asking about? There is an important distinction between recorded history and pre-history. Generally speaking, when people speak about history, they are referring to recorded history, which requires the answer to be no, Chinese history is between 2,500 and 4,000 ...


-1

Gordon Wood is the gold standard in "Historianism." His use if primary sources and then writing his works literally "in their actual words" creates indisputable facts and in that sense transcends "historical theory" and brings it back into the drab reality of research, reading, annotating and "being descriptive." To bring any past...let alone this FACTUAL ...


1

It could be the Encyclopaedia Britannica The book was first published in 1768 (almost 250 years ago), and has been updated through 15 major editions (and several changes in print per edition) - the updates include major events and changes in understanding.



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