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20

There is some controversy of what happened to Hitler's remains, owing to the general disarray of war, but there is no real controversy with regards to his death. Hitler did in his personal will and testament say that he had chosen death. I myself and my wife — in order to escape the disgrace of deposition or capitulation — choose death. It is our wish ...


19

There are two problems with the way the discussion is phrased, which I will try to summarize below. Terminology problems. Some are unfortunate byproduct of social sciences being an imprecise (to put it politely) field of study, some are byproduct of cultural/historical drifts and differences, and some are a product of deliberate misinformation by "left ...


19

Yes, Bose was welcome in Germany. The Germans could have denied him entry if they wanted to, and so there are no doubts that they were happy to see him in their country. However, Hitler repeatedly refused to issue a declaration supporting India's independence, and this suggests that he personally did not support Bose's cause. It also has to be remembered ...


19

Hitler did not consider Indians to be Aryans at all. Instead, he believed them to be barbaric Asians who did not deserve to enjoy freedom as a country. He wanted India to remain subjugated under the British (he said this openly in his book) permanently. He pointedly refused Bose's request to withdraw this statement in his only meeting with Bose. As for ...


18

Joachim Fest, who wrote a major Hitler biography in German, cites four sources and concludes thus (in footnote 63 on p. 807 of the English paperback edition): Probably the exact nature of Hitler's illness can no longer be determined, since no examination with a specific investigatory aim was ever undertaken. Because of the extremely inadequate ...


18

I have to recommend the recent book Soldaten: On Fighting, Killing, and Dying by a historian and social psychologist here, as there isn't are more objective source for understanding the mindset of those German soldiers during WWII as their own conversations: A trove of previously unpublished, transcribed conversations among German POWs—secretly recorded ...


18

That's an interesting question. There is a book by Michael Hesemann, a German historian, in which he is interpreting Hitlers religion (that is actually the title of the book) like this: Hitlers plans where going towards a "German pseudo-religion". Hitler got his first ideas from the "Ostara"-magazine, that was published between 1903 to 1931 and propagated ...


17

The encyclopaedia, following Kershaw, Ian (2008). Hitler: A Biography. New York: W. W. Norton & Company p 782, claims Parkinsons. This is I believe the standard account.


17

Because the death of Hitler was reported by the Soviets, this is generally the root cause of conspiracy theories. The general consensus among historians is that Hitler committed suicide in his Führerbunker in Berlin, by gunshot on 30 April 1945, however, controversy will remain. His body was found by a soviet counter-intelligence operations group called ...


17

Some 22 surviving high-ranking Nazis were tried at Nurmemburg after the end of the war, per agreement between the Allied powers http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuremberg_Trials#Trial The highest ranking of them, Hermann Goering was convicted of crimes against humanity and sentenced to death (alhhough he committed suicide before his execution). The same would ...


16

Here's the exact description of the photo, according to Hitlerpages.com: Hitler and his fellow-soldiers in Fournes en Weppes, April 1915. First row: Adolf Hitler, Balthasar Brandmayer, Anton Bachmann, Foxl, Max Mund. Second row: Ernst Schmidt, Johann Sperl, Jakob Weiß, Karl Tiefenböck. This way, your man is called Balthasar Brandmayer. But it ...


14

Was Hitler elected by the democratic process? I suppose, but really only in the Tammany Hall (JFK?) sense of the word. In summation: The German Communists were one of his chief competitors: he successfully framed them for the Reichstag fire and made them (basically) illegal. The same act which allowed him to boot the communists gave him authority to ...


14

No, residual paganism was not a factor in Hitler's rise to power. As far as anyone can say, that is. This theory you reference posits that the German people claimed to be Christian, yet practiced secret worship "in the dark" to pagan gods. No one can prove that any German ever worshipped a pagan god in secret. But we can say this much: Christianity was ...


12

The simple answer (and here I agree with @Evan Harper's comment) is deference to authority and careful planning by Nazis to hide the truth of what they were doing. Deference To Authority The most easily understood example of this it the Milgram exmperiment. This experiment was especially motivated by Holocaust trials. A summary from Milgram of the ...


12

Hitler was elected, yes, and exploited democratic procedures yes, but he did not come to power democratically. Hitler as a person came to power because the violence, fueled mostly by the Nazi party and the communist party was increasing, and Germany looked at risk of falling into a civil war. We already see the first undemocratic part here: The Nazi party ...


12

The case of Eduard Bloch is relevant if untypical in humanity considering Hitler's character: Eduard Bloch (30 January 1872 – 1 June 1945) was a Jewish-Austrian doctor practicing in Linz (Austria). Until 1907 Bloch was the doctor of Adolf Hitler's family. Hitler later gave Bloch special protection after the Nazi annexing of Austria ... The ...


12

Hitler was an Chameleon opportunist who used the word "Aryan", in different contexts to supplement his political ideologies, which were mainly to conquer Europe, and the systematic eradication of Jews. The Earliest definition of Aryan, given out by the Nazis, was a race of people belonging to "Indo-European tribes" and the five European sub-races Nordic, ...


11

Here is a Wiki page on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adolf_Hitler's_religious_views Below is a paragraph from the article above: Persecution of the Christian Churches In 1999 attorney Julie Seltzer Mandel, while researching documents for the "Nuremberg Project", discovered 150 bound volumes collected by Gen. William Donovan as part of his ...


11

Did Hitler really intend a limited war against Poland? The invasion of Poland was likely not intended to start a major war. Of course we can never be sure of what anybody thinks, but not only did Hitler claim not to want a major war, wanting a major war is in itself a quite strange thing to do. Most likely Hitler wanted to just annex half of Poland ...


11

Actually, according to recently declassified records, it seems that Churchill was very much in favour of summarily executing Hitler should he be captured. Whether this would have really become policy or remained just a bit of Churchillian bluster is impossible to tell.


10

According Wikipedia: Racism is the belief that inherent different traits in human racial groups justify discrimination Do you think that Hitler's racism was only about Jews? That's not quite right - it was about many other peoples, highly about Slavic nations, especially about Eastern Slavic - Russians, Ukranians, Belarusians and so on. Did you know ...


10

Hitler was awarded honorary citizenship in a few Austrian cities. Amstetten revoked Hitler's honorary citizenship in May 2011 and Braunau, which includes Ranshofen, Hitler's birthplace, followed in July 2011. Klagenfurt's mayor, Christian Scheider, removed Hitler from the city's roll of honour without waiting for verification that the city had ever honoured ...


10

There were a number of attempts on made on Hitler's life, some notable ones were One of the earliest attempts was made by Johann Georg Elser on November 8, 1939, when he placed a time bomb, at one one of the columns behind the podium, where Hitler gave a speech at the Burgerbrau Beer Cellar in Munich. The Bomb missed its deadline by 8 minutes, and Hitler ...


10

The German and Austrian Jewish population was about 750,000, of which three quarters were exterminated. Whereas the total German population was about 70 million. But 1941, when the extermination program began the number of Jewish forced labourers in German was 60,000, compared to the 2,000,000 foreign labourers (Fremdarbeiter) [source]. The Nazis decided ...


10

You are possibly referring to this: After visiting these two places you can easily see how that within a few years Hitler will emerge from the hatred that surrounds him now as one of the most significant figures who ever lived. He had boundless ambition for his country, which rendered him a menace to the peace of the world, but he had a mystery ...


9

Hitler was tapped by Hindenburg, and others, because it was felt that he was just a front-man for the Nazis, not the real power figure. As such, they believed that he could be "leashed". On November 21st, Hitler saw Hindenburg again and tried a different approach. He read a prepared statement claiming that parliamentary government had failed and ...


9

For the Eastern Europe the Nazis had the Genaralplan Ost - the General Plan "East". According to this plan the large areas of Eastern Europe should be gradually Germanized, with the native inhabitants reduced in number, resettled and/or assimilated. According to the plan, Ethnic group Percentage subject to removal Poles 80-85% Russians ...


8

I think the cause was the same as of the WW I: German militarism and expansionism. Since Kaiser Wilhelm gained power in Germany, it has been pursuing an aggressive foreign policy (e.g. the Morocco crisis) and launched an arms race with Great Britain. It resulted in one world war, which did not prove conclusively to Germans that militarism doesn't work, so ...


8

Hitler was right in this instance. It was Manstein that extended the battle too far. The "official" reason for the offensive, was to recapture the city of Kursk. That was within the reach of the Germans. The REAL purpose of the offensive was to cut off the Russian salient, of which Kursk was the tip. The reason this didn't work was that the Russians ...


8

The biography of Adam von Trott A Good German by Giles MacDonogh has a chapter on Bose and his involvement with nazi Germany in the 1930s and 1940s. Trott headed up the India Department within Germany's wartime Foreign Ministry and looked after Bose's 18-month stay in Germany during the war. Bose had visited Germany in 1933 but Hitler refused to see him. ...



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