Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Many Italians emigrated to Argentina because many Italians emigrated. Argentina, like Brazil and the United States could offer economic opportunities not to be found in the old country, but equally importantly, had policies that were open to immigration. Italian Emigration 1876-1926 Many Italians left Italy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; it ...


11

Jews had traditionally been a wide-ranging people. They had centers in Europe, Asia Minor, and even India. (When Thomas went to India in 52 AD, for example, he did so in part because there was already a thriving Jewish community.) Starting in the 50s and 60s AD, many Jews were already being run out of the Israel (think Masada and all that). In 125 AD, ...


10

Here's my proposition, basically it's just a set of Caucasus characteristics making this region especially interesting. By which we mean: there're numerous languages, 3 distinct language families, characteristic just for this region. My first point is, language diversity / fragmentation is normal for regions without a strong state / commerce / any unifying ...


9

The question as it was posed is not entirely accurate. The Sephardic Jews are, rightly, the most famous Jewish community of the Ottoman Empire. However, in Istanbul, you could find synagogues and associations belonging to Ashknazi immigrants from Europe. These were all pre-Zionist immigrants from, if memory serves, Russia. In fact, there was a power struggle ...


9

I wonder whether what you're recalling was the battle waged against Einstein by the Woman Patriot Corporation. The "corporation" was anti-suffragette in character, possibly anti-Jewish and certainly anti-communist and anti-pacifist. In 1932 the organisation filed a memorandum complaining about Einstein's return to the United States. They claimed, according ...


8

Ostensibly, Labour was against immigration controls. This is evident from its opposition to the Commonwealth Immigrants Act 1968. But your real question appears to be, how likely Labour would have passed the same law. I would argue that there's no great need for speculation. Labour was voted into power during the 1964 election. Despite its earlier ...


7

This touches upon a really fascinating cluster of debates in the history of the late colonial period and the early republic. There are likely many publications on this but it forms one of the central issues in: Aristide R. Zolberg A Nation by Design: Immigration Policy in the Fashioning of America I'll focus on Zolberg's take. The book opens a discussion ...


7

In the end of the XIX century most Jews were concentrated in the Russian empire. (Modern Poland, Ukraine, Belorussia). Until 1917 Jews in the Russian empire were discriminated (Pale of settlement, restrictions on education, discrimination in the army etc.). There were pogroms, people were killed, their property destroyed. With the start of WW I, conditions ...


6

There are more members of many ethnic backgrounds in the U.S. than in their "home" countries. That is true not only of Jews but of Irish, British, and Germans (less so of southern and eastern Europeans). There are several reasons. 1) America was the "natural" place of emigration for people suffering from religious persecution. That applied to e.g. English ...


6

To take off on the climate answer, it is noteworthy that the area between Buenos Aires and the Brazilian border (to the North), approximates the (south) latitudes of Italy's own (northern) latitudes. Thus, not only the temperature, but the rainfall and crop patterns of that part of Argentina resemble that of parts of Italy. Basically, Italians felt "at home" ...


6

It is a question of contacts. Where are you to move, and how? In general you move to where you have friends, contacts and where you can speak a language. And moving a long way with all your possessions is costly and takes time.


5

I could imagine, it is a kind of spiritual home. Jews immigrated from Muslim countries to Muslim countries (ok, Spain was Christian when the Jews were banished, but it was a new thing, and the Jews remembered on the better days under Muslim authority.) When Jews were evicted from Central/Eastern Europe they looked for similar societies to settle. They had ...


5

Warsaw is not a port. It is in the middle of the "country" (the earlier version of Poland, not today's), which is why it was chosen as the capital. Warsaw was also something of a rail hub, as far as was the case in Eastern Europe in those days. The easiest way to get to a port such as Gdansk, on the Baltic, was by rail from Warsaw. A few other cities in ...


4

First thing coming to mind: peasant's situation in Poland-Lithuania and Russian Tsardom. They could not leave their land without master's permission.


4

I've found these numbers for the total population counts at the beginning and end of this period. 1600 - 800,000 (some sources state up to 1,000,000) 1900 - 4,437,000 Now we need to factor in immigration and emigration to get the natural population change. This is very difficult because few records were kept until the turn of the nineteenth century. ...


3

The history of the Jews post-Diaspora is quite complicated. For one thing, I believe there was always a significant Jewish minority in the Muslim world, so one answer would be that they did in fact do just what you suggested. However, there were always some in Europe too. In part, this was because they were inadvertantly encoraged to live there. Christian ...


3

During Partitions of Poland, Zbaraz was a part of Austro-Hungarian Empire and there weren't good railway connections between Galician towns and those at Russian side, also because of different breadth of rails. This way I believe your grandmother could use the railway connection between Tarnopol and Krakow, which was part of Galician Railway of Archduke ...


3

One thing that may have been a big factor is the climate. Argentina is the one place in South America that has large areas of temperate climate. This allowed Europeans to go there and find not just temperatures and weather they were already acclimated to, but that allowed the kinds of agriculture they knew. The other large temperate areas available are in ...


3

Norway had emigration restrictions in the nineteenth century; they were lifted in 1860. From http://digitalarkivet.uib.no/utstilling/norge.htm (a page hosted by the Norwegian National Archives; the translation from Norwegian is mine:) In some cases one wanted to keep persons from leaving the country, and the police had registries of these. The picture ...


3

Sakoku was a set of Japanese policies that included the restriction that no Japanese could travel outside the country; these policies were effectively terminated in 1853. Wikipedia has a number of examples of emigration restrictions including A 17th century Chinese restriction on emigration. Some countries restrict the ability of women to travel abroad ...


3

The question contains a false premise. Immigrants didn't "take over" the country, the country assimiliated the immigrants, and the immigrants assimiliated into the country. The false premise is that there is a distinct and independent class of immigrants whose interests are separate from the rest of Americans and incompatible. After all, the second ...


3

I've deferred answering this because it is a complicated subject, and I can't find the right sources. My impression is that the founding fathers didn't share a coherent opinion on the subject; different states and their respective founding fathers had different opinions. However yesterday, I heard the following paragraph read aloud He has endeavoured to ...


2

Texas State Historical Association "It is difficult to estimate the number of illegal aliens forced to leave by the operation. The INS claimed as many as 1,300,000, though the number officially apprehended did not come anywhere near this total. The INS estimate rested on the claim that most aliens, fearing apprehension by the government, had voluntarily ...


2

The US has a long history of strained border relations with Mexico, especially early in Mexico's history. New Spain, which later became Mexico, was often a place where slaves would flee their masters. Texas declared independence from Mexico in 1821 and a war was fought. Mexico abolished slavery in 1829 causing more slaves in the US to flee there and ...


2

And even for no serfs in pre-1917 russia there was a tough [internal passport system] with few freedoms to travel or reside internally. The Confederate States of America also had internal passports: example Back to your question, you will be interested in this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freedom_of_movement#Europe


1

Immigrants took over America multiple times. For example, immigrants that landed in Plymouth Rock and were welcomed by Americans soon decided that America belongs to them, slaughtered most Americans, and took their land. And something vaguely like that, although not nearly as violent, happened quite a few times and keeps happening. Usually it goes like ...


1

I seem to recall emigration restrictions on Frenchmen being one of the reasons for the small population of French colonies in North America compared with the English colonies, but I'm afraid I can't place the origin of that. Equally in the early days of a united Spain, Aragonese were forbidden to trade or settle in the American colonies, as these were ...


1

There is also a simple geographic explanation to this issue. Mountains divide people, rivers bring them together. If you look at the most stable boundaries in the world, they are those that are along mountains. The Caucasuses are, of course, highly mountainous. For protection, for food, and for simple energy conservation, once a culture is established on a ...


1

I think your chronological premise is wrong: there were large Jewish communities in Europe already in the early Middle Ages. For instance, in Germany.


1

For southern Eastern Europe, the main port would have to be Salonika. From there (and other Balkan and eastern Mediterranean ports), there would have been few direct sailings to North America, but shipping could used a hub system like today's airlines do, but sailing to major centres. Anecdotal evidence points to Marseille as serving as a staging point ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible