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In 1937, the Indian Independence Movement conducted provincial elections that clearly demonstrated the will of the people. It also "wound down" an earlier campaign of armed resistance. Finally, Indians gave "qualified" support to Britain in World War II. The Indian Independence Movement showed the world that the Indians were capable of self-government. In ...


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The takeover of India, creating the British Raj, was the first step to controlling India. After the 1857 uprising, the British rewarded those who had not joined in the rebellion. It was also felt that both the princes and the large land-holders, by not joining the rebellion, had proved to be, in Lord Canning's words, "breakwaters in a storm". They ...


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According to The Declaration of Independence for Dummies, Part 1, ”But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same object, evinces a design to reduce them under absolute despotism, it is their Right, it is their Duty, to throw off such government, and to provide new guards for their future security.” can be reworded "in ...


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To answer your question on the impact of Indian Independence movement in obtaining Indian Independence, we need to look on both British and the Indian sides simultaneously. Indian scenario before WW1: India's fight to self rule began from the time of English East India company initially in South India by Puli Thevar, Pazhasi Raja(Pychy Raja), Veerapandiya ...


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"Train" in this context, means a series of events, in this case, "abuses and usurpations" as cited in the passage of another answerer. A common 18th century usage of "train" was "wagon train," as in a group of wagons pulled by horse that carried food and other supplies for an army. It was only in the 19th century, after the invention of steam engines and ...


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I don't think we should give full credit to the British for the 'divide and rule' policy. They could very well have been giving in to the popular demand those days. For e.g. This was Sir Syed Ahmed Khan's speech in 1888 Now, suppose that all English, and the whole English army, were to leave India, taking with them all their cannon and their splendid ...


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Muhammad Ali Jinnah was the founder of Pakistan. He started of as a strong Indian Nationalist. However he was disturbed by the comparative backwardness of Muslims in Big Business. Jinnah, like the Turkish economist Timur Kuran, identified the cause of as Islam's Inheritance Law. His own community was exempt from it and had done well. If reforming the ...



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