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13

Because China was actually pretty far from India. For most of the past millennia, China and India were not "neighbouring countries" in any meaningful sense of the word. Most Chinese empires did not actually stretch all the way to the Indian subcontinent. It seems you're considering China and India based on their modern borders, but that is misleading: ...


9

Because it didn't have a choice: it had neither the will to defy the British Government, nor the ability to do so. Remember corporations are not people; its shareholders and directors were. In this case, most of them were British, owning properties and with aspirations in Britain. That alone made resisting a duly constituted Act of Parliament by force ...


5

Yes. Alcohol has been produced in India from ancient times. But they may not qualify as "wine, beer, whiskey". The evolution of alcohol use patterns in India can be divided into four broad historical periods (time of written records), beginning with the Vedic era (ca. 1500–700 BCE). From 700 BCE to 1100 CE, (“Reinterpretation and Synthesis”) is the time ...


4

Good Fences Make Good Neighboors The answer consists of 1 word - Himalayas. Okay, let me add the second word: Tibet. Basically, the two cultures have been completely separated by an insurmountable barrier (not to mention that the fact that India and China share a border today is an artifact of the 20th century, when China annexed Tibet).


3

Just an addendum to Rajib’s comprehensive answer. The Buddhist Jātakas are a collection of stories about the historical Buddha’s previous lives – the Theravada version contains roughly 550. Many feature animals as characters and are drawn from folkloric sources. The Kumbha-jātaka (No. 512) contains an explanation of the origins of alcohol as an ...


3

He didn't. Mu'izz al-Din Muhammad captured Rai Pithora in the Second Battle of Tarain in 1192, and had him executed. Because Muhammad of Ghor was assassinated by unknown persons in 1206, a story appeared that it was Prithviraj who somehow took his revenge. That story has no historical basis.


3

If you look at the map, you can see that there are highly mountainous regions covering northeastern India and Southwest China. So even if you draw a boundary line somewhere through these mountains, you can see that the desirability and likelihood of moving or fighting across these mountains is pretty slim (at least until 1962). They acted as a buffer zone ...


2

The English (later British) East India Company did act politically in London: it had more political power when it was rich and paying or lending money to the government in London than when the situation was reversed. Its lobby was for a trade monopoly with India and freedom to take commercial and territorial decisions; its opponents wanted trade ...



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