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27

I don't think there's much truth in this claim. Although the US does speak English, the spread of the English language is because British empire was the most successful amongst colonial empires. Although India was one of the important colonies (the so-called Jewel in the Crown), it wasn't the only one. There were other colonies in Australia, Canada, Africa ...


15

Like most early Indian trading firms operating in South Africa, Dada Abullah & Co. went into rapid decline after the turn of the century.[1] The firm's founder and principal partner, Abdullah Haji Adam Jhaveri (i.e. Dada Abdullah) did not have any sons to succeed him, while his sole daughter was married in India. Thus, upon his death in 1912, the firm ...


13

The claims you cite are based on several wrong assumptions. That the development of the US strongly depended on investment from Britain. British colonies are independent since 1776, and long before that they were self-sufficient (Otherwise they would not fight for independence:-) British rule in India formally started much later, in 1850. It is true that ...


11

Legalities Modern India evolved out of the transitionary Dominion of India, which was created from territories of the British Raj. It is important to note that neither Bhutan nor Nepal were princely states under British India. In Nepal's case, the Himalayan kingdom successfully negotiated a Treaty of Friendship in 1923, in which Britain recognised Nepalese ...


11

I would guess that this fellow was stationed at the American consulate general (that is what AM CON GEN stands for) in Calcutta between 1961 and 1962. So to answer your precise question: Probably not much.


10

Sati were supposed to be voluntary. Since it was offensive to the sentiments of the Mughals, its rulers such as Akbar the Great explicitly banned involuntary sati. On a superficial level, therefore, most these women were not resistant to committing sati at all. In fact, the Mughals expended a great deal of effort trying to convince women applying for ...


10

Modern Yoga as it is known in the West gained traction in the late 1890s, when Indian monks began transmitting their knowledge to the Western world. Specifically, the influential Swami Vivekananda is often credited with introducing Yoga to the West. Yoga was introduced into the West by an Indian sage called Swami Vivekanada, who demonstrated Yoga ...


8

I think it is most properly represented as a mix of both. Prior to WWII, British (UK) English did expand because: It was the language of administration of the Empire. If the natives wanted to be anywhere near the seat of power, they had to learn English. If they could afford to, many would send their children to study in England1. Commercially, you would ...


8

I am currently reading Nehru's 'The Discovery of India' which is about Indian history as well as his experiences of Indian freedom struggle. I think you can download it legally from here. Although he has substantially praised Buddhism in the book, that is equally true about Hinduism as well. Actually, what he seems to be interested in is the sociological ...


7

Political expediency. A common, populist explanation is that Aurangzeb Alamgir was religiously conservative, as taninamdar has noted. However, this is certainly not the whole picture. Though his personal religious outlook may well have been an underlying bias, political considerations were at least equally important reasons for Aurangzeb's policies - if not ...


6

The most dominating language in science and the most learned foreign language before WWII was German. After Germany's defeat most of Europe fell under British and American occupation. Also a lot of scientists emigrated to the US. This determined the widespread use of English.


6

Hinduism is not a religion but a culture. There is no compulsion to attend a particular temple to worship. You can worship at home or even place a stone and imagine it as a god and start worshiping it. The first wave of Islamic invaders cut 10s and 100s of thousands of 'non-believers' and history suggest many took vows not to eat/drink until they have seen ...


6

The map, is incorrect. Most of the source about Lalitaditya, is from Kalhan. Neither being a contemporary, nor being independent, Kalhan can be said to have exaggerated. I would like to quote Mohd. Ashraf The descriptions of his foreign expeditions have a mixture of historical and legendary details. His first enterprise was directed against Yasovarman, ...


5

The Fall of Constantinople had a negligible effect on the launching of the Age of Discovery, school textbooks notwithstanding. It was well under way a generation earlier, due to the perfection of the caravel in Portugal under Prince Henry the Navigator and the explorations he launched down the coast of Africa. The Madeira Islands had been rediscovered in ...


5

Because it suited British interests to do so. It seems you are wondering why the Poona Pact was reversed, but this should not be surprising. The Poona Pact was a compromise between Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar and Mahatma Gandhi, designed to reconcile the Untouchables and the Hindus against British Imperialism. In contrast, the Government of India Act 1935 was an ...


4

Mahatma Gandhi famously said about Mohammad: I wanted to know the best of life of the one who holds today the undisputed sway over the hearts of millions of mankind. I became more than convinced that… it was the rigid simplicity, the utter self effacement of the Prophet… his intense devotion to his friends and followers, his intrepidity, his ...


4

US did help Pakistan in all possible ways. It blocked UN action against Pakistan for the genocide it committed, sent military supplies and encouraged countries like Iran and Jordan (which were US allies at that time) to do the same, shielded war criminals from prosecution, sent battle groups to threaten India and so on. In short, it did everything just shy ...


4

His views in the Harijan are as follows:: “Like other groups of people in this country, Muslims also have the right of self determination. We are living here as a joint family and hence any member has the right to get separated (Harijan, April 6, 1940).” “If majority of the Muslims of this country maintain that they are a different nation and there is ...


4

The narrative states that Enterprise was off the coast of Viet Nam on Dec 10, 1971. The way I recall the situation, Enterprise was in the area of Hong Kong and it was more like Dec 20 or close there about. I was on one of the other ships in the task force and we were off the coast of Viet Nam. We were transferring our cargo to other ships because we were ...


4

That map looks like a joke. Like some kid randomly colored in a world map. Even the article doesn't agree with the picture. The history of kashmir page on wiki shows a much more reasonable extent. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/63/Karkota_Empire%2C_India_%28derived%29.jpg


4

Dada Abdulla and Sons in South Africa needed a lawyer who could speak Gujarati to settle a dispute: Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (his birth name) arrived in South Africa in 1893 at the relatively tender age of 24 as a newly qualified lawyer on a temporary assignment to act on behalf of a local Indian trader in a commercial dispute. What was meant to be a ...


4

In 1937, the Indian Independence Movement conducted provincial elections that clearly demonstrated the will of the people. It also "wound down" an earlier campaign of armed resistance. Finally, Indians gave "qualified" support to Britain in World War II. The Indian Independence Movement showed the world that the Indians were capable of self-government. In ...


3

I'd think a major factor has been that two consecutive global superpowers, Britain and then the USA, have had English as their main language has played a large part in this. I'd back this up with Russian being a relatively common language to learn in the cold war period, whereas now it's considered maybe less useful, and this might be because Russia is way ...


3

I decided to read the book anyway, after waiting for someone to answer the question. I understand this is not a place to review books, but here are my two cents. The narrative is, in my opinion, as unbiased as it can get. While talking about unclear parts of Indian history like Aryan invasion / migration / indigenous Aryans, he explains pros and cons of ...


3

The first few Islamic rulers in India were more focused on land expansion than religious ideals. When the 3rd generation emperor, Akbar, arrived in power, he was famed for promoting religious peace and even creating his own religion Din-i Ilahi, a mix between many different religions. He even married a Hindu princess. After that, most of the Islamic rule in ...


3

Since your question asks us to concern ourselves specifically with the Middle Ages (5th to the 15th century), I will not venture to comment on the Mughal Dynasty and the shaping of identities in the modern world. However, to ground all of this in present-day observable context, I'd like you to give this a read. Islam's contact with India can be traced back ...


3

Dipavamsa VI 18 states (see page 43 in Oldenburg's work) Asoko rajjam kâresi Pàțaliputte prurruttame, Abhisitto tîņi vassâni pasanno buddhasàsane Which roughly translates to, Ashoka ruled in Pataliputra, best of towns, Three years after his coronation, he converted to Budhhism So, yes there is a source.


3

It had a significant effect. It was not just Constantinople itself that was important but several other strategic areas as well. Constantinople was a key trading center on both the northern and southern silk roads, so that when it fell in 1453 trade was greatly disrupted and goods from the east became much more expensive. The southern silk road route, which ...


3

Eliminating the distinctive white dome would be only one part of a camouflage plan. It's a big and delicate job and has to be done in advance. All other elements of the camouflage plan can be done when there is an air raid alert, but they're worthless if there's a big white dome showing. First thing to realize is the world looks very different at 15,000 ...


3

This seems to be the rulers' method of "divide and rule", and largely to prevent the Congress from getting too strong: ...ensuring that the Congress could never rule alone or gain enough seats to bring down the government.. This was done by over-representing the Princes, by giving every possible minority the right to separately vote for ...



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