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26

I don't think there's much truth in this claim. Although the US does speak English, the spread of the English language is because British empire was the most successful amongst colonial empires. Although India was one of the important colonies (the so-called Jewel in the Crown), it wasn't the only one. There were other colonies in Australia, Canada, Africa ...


20

Yes, surprising as it is, I found credible sources indicating that there was some discussion of offering India East Africa as a mandate. Perhaps it is useful for others who wish to read more about this a full detail of my sources. In "How India Became Territorial: Foreign Policy, Diaspora, Geopolitics (2014)" by Itty Abraham, I found this quote: On war ...


13

The claims you cite are based on several wrong assumptions. That the development of the US strongly depended on investment from Britain. British colonies are independent since 1776, and long before that they were self-sufficient (Otherwise they would not fight for independence:-) British rule in India formally started much later, in 1850. It is true that ...


12

Yes. Off the top of my head, jauhar is reminiscent of the Siege of Masada. Looking at the wikipedia entry for jauhar (which you linked), I see also a reference to Balinese puputan. Finally, here is a list of historical mass suicides, a number of which fit the jauhar pattern (women of a defeated group suiciding to avoid capture or slavery). In some cases, men ...


12

Genghis Khan mostly made a one-way trip. There were two main branches of the Silk Road (which wasn't an actual road, but rather an itinerary). One passed north of the Himalayas and one south (or by ship through the Arabian Sea). These were the easiest customary itineraries one could take to cross Asia, as they minimized the amount of mountain-crossing one ...


12

Like most early Indian trading firms operating in South Africa, Dada Abullah & Co. went into rapid decline after the turn of the century.[1] The firm's founder and principal partner, Abdullah Haji Adam Jhaveri (i.e. Dada Abdullah) did not have any sons to succeed him, while his sole daughter was married in India. Thus, upon his death in 1912, the firm ...


11

Legalities Modern India evolved out of the transitionary Dominion of India, which was created from territories of the British Raj. It is important to note that neither Bhutan nor Nepal were princely states under British India. In Nepal's case, the Himalayan kingdom successfully negotiated a Treaty of Friendship in 1923, in which Britain recognised Nepalese ...


10

The British East India Company raised three forces between 1740-1757. These became known as the Presidency Armies, named after the three Presidencies in India under Company rule. They were the: Bengal Army Bombay Army Madras Army The size of these armies underwent tremendous growth as the Company expanded in India and acquired ever more security ...


10

It is a broad statement, and difficult to prove in terms of population percentage practicing Buddhism in the whole subcontinent as opposed to being patronized by monarchs. In fact Amartya Sen makes it amply clear in his book that he refers to the fact that everyone, including Chinese travelers, referred to the subcontinent as a "Buddhist Kingdom". However, ...


10

Sati were supposed to be voluntary. Since it was offensive to the sentiments of the Mughals, its rulers such as Akbar the Great explicitly banned involuntary sati. On a superficial level, therefore, most these women were not resistant to committing sati at all. In fact, the Mughals expended a great deal of effort trying to convince women applying for ...


10

I would guess that this fellow was stationed at the American consulate general (that is what AM CON GEN stands for) in Calcutta between 1961 and 1962. So to answer your precise question: Probably not much.


9

Modern Yoga as it is known in the West gained traction in the late 1890s, when Indian monks began transmitting their knowledge to the Western world. Specifically, the influential Swami Vivekananda is often credited with introducing Yoga to the West. Yoga was introduced into the West by an Indian sage called Swami Vivekanada, who demonstrated Yoga ...


8

I think it is most properly represented as a mix of both. Prior to WWII, British (UK) English did expand because: It was the language of administration of the Empire. If the natives wanted to be anywhere near the seat of power, they had to learn English. If they could afford to, many would send their children to study in England1. Commercially, you would ...


8

I am currently reading Nehru's 'The Discovery of India' which is about Indian history as well as his experiences of Indian freedom struggle. I think you can download it legally from here. Although he has substantially praised Buddhism in the book, that is equally true about Hinduism as well. Actually, what he seems to be interested in is the sociological ...


7

Ululation is of such ancient origins, likely in Sumer, that it would be difficult to trace its diffusion to other cultures. For example, a Sumerian proverb written down 4,000 years ago reads: (What characterizes) the carpenter is the chisel (What characterizes) the reed weaver is the basket The blacksmith (is known to) make tiny sides ...


7

Political expediency. A common, populist explanation is that Aurangzeb Alamgir was religiously conservative, as taninamdar has noted. However, this is certainly not the whole picture. Though his personal religious outlook may well have been an underlying bias, political considerations were at least equally important reasons for Aurangzeb's policies - if not ...


6

Origins: There are slightly different views on when Buddhism entered, flourished and declined in the Kerala region. The region itself has been variously designated through history as part of the Chola kingdom (from 150 C.E.) and later as the state of Travancore under the Tirunals prior to India's independence. One view is that Buddhism flourished only for a ...


6

The map, is incorrect. Most of the source about Lalitaditya, is from Kalhan. Neither being a contemporary, nor being independent, Kalhan can be said to have exaggerated. I would like to quote Mohd. Ashraf The descriptions of his foreign expeditions have a mixture of historical and legendary details. His first enterprise was directed against Yasovarman, ...


5

British Government British policy is that the relationship between the British Crown and the Indian States terminates in full, without being transferred to the newly created India or Pakistan. It is therefore up to the princely states themselves to decide which of the two dominions they would join. This is expressed in the Indian Independence Act 1947, ...


5

The most dominating language in science and the most learned foreign language before WWII was German. After Germany's defeat most of Europe fell under British and American occupation. Also a lot of scientists emigrated to the US. This determined the widespread use of English.


5

Based on the limited information presented in the question, I would say no. The general model suggests that early Indo-Europeans reached India somewhere after 2,000 BC. There they possibly adopted a proto-Dravidian deity, ana-mandi or male monkey, into their pantheon under the Sanskritised name Hanuman. Given the timeline, claims of the idol being 5,000 ...


5

The Fall of Constantinople had a negligible effect on the launching of the Age of Discovery, school textbooks notwithstanding. It was well under way a generation earlier, due to the perfection of the caravel in Portugal under Prince Henry the Navigator and the explorations he launched down the coast of Africa. The Madeira Islands had been rediscovered in ...


5

Because it suited British interests to do so. It seems you are wondering why the Poona Pact was reversed, but this should not be surprising. The Poona Pact was a compromise between Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar and Mahatma Gandhi, designed to reconcile the Untouchables and the Hindus against British Imperialism. In contrast, the Government of India Act 1935 was an ...


4

Mahatma Gandhi famously said about Mohammad: I wanted to know the best of life of the one who holds today the undisputed sway over the hearts of millions of mankind. I became more than convinced that… it was the rigid simplicity, the utter self effacement of the Prophet… his intense devotion to his friends and followers, his intrepidity, his ...


4

There is no absolute consensus on this matter, A few scholars have even contended that Buddhism never disappeared as such from India. On this view, Buddhism simply changed form, or was absorbed into Hindu practices. Buddha is even viewed as an avatar of the god Vishnu in Vaishnava Hinduism although buddha himself denied it.. But What is not disputed ...


4

The population of India during the British Raj days was first counted during the census of 1871. Prior to this a full census and data on British subjects were not available. The 1891 census also did a linguistic division, but nothing such as "British Subjects". But people who spoke English as a mother tongue returned 238,409. The total Number of people with ...


4

Any clue about such sword? There's apparently a Hindu sacred text that contains an account of a sword being used to behead an elephant Then, O great king, having uttered a loud shout, Bhima, sword in hand impetuously jumping on (Bhanumat's) excellent elephant aided by the latter's tusks, gained, O sire, the back of that prince of tuskers, and with ...


4

That map looks like a joke. Like some kid randomly colored in a world map. Even the article doesn't agree with the picture. The history of kashmir page on wiki shows a much more reasonable extent. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/63/Karkota_Empire%2C_India_%28derived%29.jpg


3

India's climate is the diametric opposite of Mongolia's climate. That is hot and wet versus cold and dry. Genghis Khan's troops would have suffered horribly (both horses and men) in most parts of India. The humid air was a real "dampener" (pun intended) for Mongol bows. The parts of "India" that the Mongols occupied, (Pakistan and Kashmir per a map in the ...



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