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Yes. Mainly because Jinnah was so arrogant and had a sort of superiority complex that Mountbatten did not like. Also, Jinnah was too eager to create Pakistan as early as possible so that he alone could take the credit for creating a Muslim state. All those irritated Mountbatten and he swung towards Hindus. Thus he favored India by offering majority of ...


0

There is no exact proof that explains the decline of buddhism in India. But as you mentioned this started in late 12th Century. But we can find many theories on the disappearance of Buddhism in India. 1. Influence of Brahmanism We all know that Hinduism is one of the most dominant and oldest religion in India. But after Great Emperor became devout ...


8

Sati were supposed to be voluntary. Since it was offensive to the sentiments of the Mughals, its rulers such as Akbar the Great explicitly banned involuntary sati. On a superficial level, therefore, most these women were not resistant to committing sati at all. In fact, the Mughals expended a great deal of effort trying to convince women applying for ...


5

Political expediency. A common, populist explanation is that Aurangzeb Alamgir was religiously conservative, as taninamdar has noted. However, this is certainly not the whole picture. Though his personal religious outlook may well have been an underlying bias, political considerations were at least equally important reasons for Aurangzeb's policies - if not ...


0

I wouldn't characterize "interwar" proposals by Britain as efforts to get India an East African colony, because there was no India. A different and better way to put it was that Britain wanted to do something for Indians in East Africa. That's partly because Indians had helped Britain a lot in that part of the world. For instance, Indians helped build the ...


1

One of the primary aims of the Government of India Act was to weaken the rising Indian governing class, specifically, the Congress Party. For instance, Burma was separated from India altogether, and a number of Indian provinces were subdivided for "gerrymandering purposes. The idea of having "separate but equal" electorates for the classes at the bottom was ...


1

You need to realize that the Government of India Act was passed by Britain, not India, since India was a British colony at the time. Whatever Gandhi worked out with the other Indians has no effect on what the Brits do unless they convinced them it's for better for British interests, which they didn't.



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