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5

The map, is incorrect. Most of the source about Lalitaditya , is from Kalhan. Neither being a contemporary, nor being independent, Kalhan can be said to have exaggerated. I would like to qoute Mohd. Ashraf The descriptions of his foreign expeditions have a mixture of historical and legendary details. His first enterprise was directed against Yasovarman, ...


1

It is true this particular king was very energetic and made many campaigns against the Arabs into Persia and even upper central Asia, but these campaigns were just military expeditions, not a controlled empire. The enduring Karkota Empire was much smaller and only lasted for about 200 years. The following map shows the situation in 700 AD and this situation ...


3

That map looks like a joke. Like some kid randomly colored in a world map. Even the article doesn't agree with the picture. The history of kashmir page on wiki shows a much more reasonable extent. http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/63/Karkota_Empire%2C_India_%28derived%29.jpg


1

US did help Pakistan in all possible ways. It blocked UN action against Pakistan for the genocide it committed, sent military supplies and encouraged countries like Iran and Jordan (which were US allies at that time) to do the same, shielded war criminals from prosecution, sent battle groups to threaten India and so on. In short, it did everything just shy ...


1

I believe three factors contributed to English being today's lingua franca: as others have already mentioned, Great Britain was an "empire where the sun would never set" in the 18th century US pop culture and technological advances after world war II (e.g. Elvis and the Internet) English is a really simple language to learn (hardly any grammar, declension, ...


-2

Buddhism was dominant in some parts of the Hindustan not as in entire Hindustan. Actually, It was dominant in Magadha Kingdom (today's Bihar State). Usually, Emperors were the followers of Buddhism but never forced others to follow Buddhism. For example, Ashoka the Great, Harshavardhana the Great etc. During the reign of Ashoka the Great, Buddhism traveled ...


-1

Your question is the rare one that no one even bothers to ask. From the beginning of the creation of Indian history, bias has played an important role. The funny thing is, the history of India being taught in schools are created by the western people of British East India Company. The purpose of creating biased Indian history is to strengthen their rule ...


5

Based on the limited information presented in the question, I would say no. The general model suggests that early Indo-Europeans reached India somewhere after 2,000 BC. There they possibly adopted a proto-Dravidian deity, ana-mandi or male monkey, into their pantheon under the Sanskritised name Hanuman. Given the timeline, claims of the idol being 5,000 ...


2

I'd think a major factor has been that two consecutive global superpowers, Britain and then the USA, have had English as their main language has played a large part in this. I'd back this up with Russian being a relatively common language to learn in the cold war period, whereas now it's considered maybe less useful, and this might be because Russia is way ...


-1

Something else to consider is the language its self may lend to the spread. As noted by John Story, English has stolen many words and ideas from other languages. Many language purists bemoan this as it makes it more difficult to learn, but the richer vocabulary allows for more ideas to be expressed concisely leading to an easier ability to express new ...


-1

English came to dominate the world during the last 50 years for 2 major reasons: 1) The United States has the largest number of wealthiest consumers. If you manufacture anything anywhere in the world you are going to want to do what you can to sell into the United States. You have to learn the language of your customers if you want to sell to them. By ...


7

I think it is most properly represented as a mix of both. Prior to WWII, British (UK) English did expand because: It was the language of administration of the Empire. If the natives wanted to be anywhere near the seat of power, they had to learn English. If they could afford to, many would send their children to study in England1. Commercially, you would ...


5

The most dominating language in science and the most learned foreign language before WWII was German. After Germany's defeat most of Europe fell under British and American occupation. Also a lot of scientists emigrated to the US. This determined the widespread use of English.


11

The claims you cite are based on several wrong assumptions. That the development of the US strongly depended on investment from Britain. British colonies are independent since 1776, and long before that they were self-sufficient (Otherwise they would not fight for independence:-) British rule in India formally started much later, in 1850. It is true that ...


23

I don't think there's much truth in this claim. Although the US does speak English, the spread of the English language is because British empire was the most successful amongst colonial empires. Although India was one of the important colonies (the so-called Jewel in the Crown), it wasn't the only one. There were other colonies in Australia, Canada, Africa ...


0

There were several reasons while Nepal, Bhutan, (and until recently, Sikkim), remained Independent of India. 1) The first was their remote, mountainous locations. That made it hard for Britain to occupy them, and the fierce soldiers of Nepal (the Ghurkas) were particularly prized by Britain. Basically, it was easier and more profitable for Britain to "deal" ...


0

This is a partial answer relating to the book's unbiased status. No. The book is not unbiased. The book's biases may be historiographically justifiable, but, necessarily, the book is not unbiased. Bias is as unremovable from texts as it is from woven fabric: the fabric of texts produces a bias. Sources: historiographical theory of bias in texts, and the ...


1

Regardless of what the Hindu nationalists vehemently claim, the Aryan Invasion Theory (AIT) has not been disproven. Merely called into question. It is India's version of America's bitter controversy about creation or evolution. In America our big disagreement is: Did we come from Adam and Eve, or from ape-like creatures? In India the issue is: Was it white ...


10

Legalities Modern India evolved out of the transitionary Dominion of India, which was created from territories of the British Raj. It is important to note that neither Bhutan nor Nepal were princely states under British India. In Nepal's case, the Himalayan kingdom successfully negotiated a Treaty of Friendship in 1923, in which Britain recognised Nepalese ...



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