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6

NATO used force, or the threat of force, to remove Kosovo from Serbia. The UN charter, Article 2, paragraph 4: All Members shall refrain in their international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any state, or in any other manner inconsistent with the Purposes of the United ...


5

Even today I doubt that there is such a thing like a "European culture". The cultural differences between different countries are huge. I'm not just talking about the difference between a Nordic country and a Mediterranean country, even neighboring countries like Belgium (where I'm from) and Germany are quite different, culturally. Much has to do with ...


4

The Amarna letters and other associated documents indicate the existence of permanent embassies in Egypt in the 14th century BC. As a matter of practicality it has always been the practice to demand hostages among states in tension. For example, one king will send his son to be a hostage in the court of the other king. This son acts as a sort of an embassy. ...


4

“Europe” and “Asia” as distinct cultural units are defined by Herodotus almost at the beginning of his histories.(1.4.4: τὴν γὰρ Ἀσίην καὶ τὰ ἐνοικέοντα ἔθνεα βάρβαρα οἰκηιεῦνται οἱ Πέρσαι, τὴν δὲ Εὐρώπην καὶ τὸ Ἑλληνικόν ἥγηνται κεχωρίσθαι. ) Herodotus lived in the 5th century BC.


4

The US very often offers aid, in cases of disaster as mentioned by Oldcat, but also to countries that are having economic or security issues. As pointed out by Semaphore the answer to the question is: No, not all countries that exist/ed at the same time as the US have been offered aid to I also think it's important to understand what exactly is "aid" ...


4

The ideas behind the EEZ are put forward quite well in this proclamation by President Harry S Truman in 1947 Formally: Proclamation 2667 - Policy of the United States With Respect to the Natural Resources of the Subsoil and Sea Bed of the Continental Shelf "Having concern for the urgency of conserving and prudently utilizing its natural resources, the ...


3

Read about the Tragedy of the Commons. It is a well understood economic observation that any resource left unmanaged will tend to be over exploited, as it is in the individual self-interest to do so. When combined with the basic observation, in life as well as child-rearing, that one should never make idle threats, the question you ask really should be ...


2

The issue with any treaty provision is what will you do if the side does violate it. Ideally, you would instantly spring to war. However, will your allies and your own people support this? Hitler was able to spin the 100000 man army and the limits on equipment into a straitjacket that wouldn't even let them defend themselves against their smallest ...


2

To be pedantic, and to repeat some of what's already been said in comments ... there isn't, in fact, absolute uniformity in the way those national symbols have been constituted around the world. The Gaddafi-era Libyan flag was something of a non-flag, an idiosyncratic statement. Arguably the Saudi flag is as much a banner as a flag. The Nepali flag, as you ...


1

I think you are being misdirected by the theatre of politics. It works like this. Somebody does something "against" the leader. The underlings and sycophants make a noise about it, as they must. The leader takes it in their stride, rises above and appears more statesman-like. So, from my recollection, the answer is that it had a positive effect on ...


1

I think it goes throughout history, and I'm inclined to include the examples that you've excluded that is European Christiandom and the Roman Empire. They're notions of continental unity on the ecclesiastical and political level. Periodically there had been revivals of the Roman political project, for example by Charlemagne. The roots of European culture is ...


1

To my mind, every extradition case is an instance of "a foreign power attempting to compel another country to abide by International Law by means of that [second] country's judiciary". extradition, in international law, the process by which one state, upon the request of another, effects the return of a person for trial for a crime punishable by the ...



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