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13

In Common Sense, Thomas Paine wrote, "there is something very absurd in supposing a continent to be perpetually governed by an island." The United States, Canada, and Australia (New Zealand to a lesser extent), were all countries of continental size, far away from England. As such, they naturally wanted to have their own destinies. Scotland, Wales, and ...


10

The problem started with the "flight of the Earls" in 1607. After losing a war to England, the Catholic Ulster nobles Hugh O'Donnell, Hugh O'Neil, and others, fled Ireland for Europe. Meanwhile, England brought in Protestant "settlers" from Scotland to "pacify" Ulster. Thus, the formerly most rebellious province of Ireland became the most pro British. These ...


9

In "Ptolemy's map of Ireland: a modern decoding,"* R. Darcy and William Flynn discuss Claudius Ptolemy's Geographia, a map (among many other things) mentioning what is believed to be Ireland, dating back to the early second century. Wiki says 140 AD but I could find no other source to corroborate that claim-- but logic suggests Ptolemy made Geographia in his ...


9

World War I is the short answer. Conscription efforts incensed large volumes of the Irish population and the massive casualties sustained as well as economic damage from fighting the war made it harder for the British to respond. I'm sure the 1918 flu didn't help matters any.


7

The róisín dubh, “little dark rose” or “little black rose,” is a symbol of Ireland, and has been used as a term of endearment for Ireland by Yeats and other poets. The 15th-century folk song “Róisín Dubh” is a love song in which Ireland is personified as a woman nicknamed Róisín Dubh, not unlike the way France is “Marianne” or the United States is ...


7

It was made illegal in Republican Ireland in 1937. Probably as a reaction to England broadening its laws on the subject.


6

This is kind of a wide-ranging question. I'll do my best with it. The Goidelic branch of the Celtic languages consists of Irish Gaelic, Scottish Gaelic, and Manx. It appears to have differentiated in Ireland, the other branches existing due to conquest/immigration. In particular, Scottish Gaelic pretty much completely replaced the Pictish element in ...


6

One of the factors of Irish independence in 1918 was U.S. President Wilson's Fourteen Points declaration, which included national self-determination. Used as a weapon against Germany and her allies in favor of central European peoples, it was also held against the British in favor of the Irish. Also, Britain had been weakened and sickened by the carnage of ...


6

A lot of the records were lost when the Dublin Public Record Office was blown up in 1922. But see http://www.gov.ie/en/essays/genealogy.html


6

Ireland at the time was under British rule and Britain didn't adopt the Gregorian calendar until 1752 so it would still officially be on the Julian calender and written records would use this. Since Catholic countries adopted the Gregorian calender much sooner (it being introduced by pope Gregory) it's possible that Catholic church sources, especially those ...


5

Australia achieved independence from the United Kingdom in 1986 ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia_Act_1986 ). This occurred for a number of reasons: The UK's entry into the EEC and the exclusion of Australian exports from the UK market; Lingering resentment over the nature of the Dismissal; and, the fact that Australia had been a functionally ...


5

The principal reason that Protestants in Ireland opposed Home Rule was fear of extermination. In every uprising from the Irish Confederate Wars of 1641 to the 1798 rebellion there were numerous massacres of Protestants, and this bred a fear of rule by a Catholic Church dominated majority. After the establishment of the Free State there was a church/state ...


4

The Faddan More Psalter, dating from around 800 AD, found in a bog in Ireland, is lined with papyrus, leading to suggestions of links between the early Irish Christian Church and the Middle Eastern Coptic Church.


4

I haven't heard of a connection between Ireland and Egypt, but I have heard of Vikings making it to Greece closer to 1200 BC. I didn't see much about it on Wikipedia, but this article by Ellis Peterson is pretty reflective of what I had heard in a history class several years ago. He describes a Viking invasion at a time when the Greeks were weak. If the ...


3

Scotland, Ireland and Wales along with England were all integral parts of the UK with full representation in the UK government. The four nations each benefited from the Union, for the most part anyway. And so with the exception of Ireland, there has never been a majority in any of the four in favour of independence. (that may change soon though.) Canada, ...


3

Actually the perception of these places being independent is much greater then the actual degree of separation. In Canada for instance they had to ask the queen for permission to dissolve the parliament. Fun fact: Canadians pay more per capita in taxes to the queen then the British do. Approximately 1.54 per capita vs the 1.32 that the English pay. Added ...


3

I found a very interesting source — a Ph.D. thesis by Mag. Lisa Ferris entitled “Irish Views on Old Austria and Austrian Views on the Irish Question, 1848 – 1918” devoted to the study of Irish in Austria. (It’s 775 pages long!) Here is a bit from page 19 (page 104 of the PDF document): The Taaffes, although almost completely integrated in Austria, never ...


3

I'm trying to trace the birth certificate and I'm wondering about open questions such as: was she 'British' or 'Irish' or did she start 'British' and become 'Irish' automatically as a child? Remember that people can be both 'British' and 'Irish'. This might help track down her parents: Online, searchable, Irish censuses from 1901 and 1911 ...


3

The Irish War of Independence is usually viewed at starting in 1916, with the Easter Rising. It was militarily a disaster, since they surrendered after a few days. The British government executed most of the the ring leaders, and turned them into martyrs, further helping the Irish Independence movement.


3

Astronomy was necessary for a calendar and calendar was necessary in all agricultural (neolithic) societies.


2

The British were exhausted, and indeed bled dry by WWI. There was no will for yet another war of attrition, and also, Michael Collins was a master at guerilla war.


2

While providing links is not the best way of answering, Wikipedia's article on History of Astronomy could, in this case, be made-to-order. It reviews astronomical evolution, beliefs and practices right from Babylonians to modern astronomy sequentially and points to dedicated chronicles were relevant (ex- Egyptian, Indian, China etc.)


2

I am going to catalog the results above because comments sometimes get deleted, and are not intended to be part of the permanent record for a question. The Online Books Page for Charles Kingston O'Mahoney, 1884- All entries for the name O'Mahoney at GravestonePhotos.com Charles Kingston O'Mahoney grave monument details (now 1884-1944) Project Gutenberg: ...


2

The Dublin Public Record Office wouldn't have held birth certificates for people born in Tuam, if anywhere for that matter. There would probably be a paper record held in the parish church (cathedral in Tuam). I grew up a few miles from Tuam but I doubt if they've anything digitised.


2

For Canada, many reasons brought it to independence. First of all, colonies were taken and land was captured so metropolis could exploit natural resources there. Canada was thought to have gold (and a way to go straight to China, the Northwest passage). Finally, none of these were proven, and the most wanted resources were 1-fish 2-beaver fur 3- wood ...


2

This question is deceptively complex unless you understand the backdrop of the English Civil War. There is a timeline of events which is a useful overview, but unless you understand why the events are important, it is merely a list of dates. The best resource for understanding that is the Revolutions Podcast which approaches a complex set of subjects with ...


1

There are a few reasons that the Australasian colonies decided to federate – and the emphasis will differ depending on which (historical) person you ask. If I may use a modern comparison, there a few reasons that Australia did not become a republic when the referendum was put to the people in 1999: there were various groups and people advocating the “Yes” or ...


1

We should note that many of the people in these places are NOT of British ancestry. The French Canadians of Quebec come to mind - they certainly were not eager to be British subjects, but were more willing to support an independent Canada. Australia also has a large population of Irish ancestry who, again, probably were not thrilled to be ruled by Britain. ...


1

The Protestants in Ireland were a small (but wealthy) minority. This put them in a precarious situtation, since an uprising could deprive them of power. If they unite with the United Kingdom of Great Britain, then they are in a much safer place.


1

The use of the word 'Celts', or the non Roman spelling, 'Kelts' (Romans had no K in their alphabet and so used C) is very confusing. The Britons were not Kelts, the Romans record that the Britons or Pretani called themselves the Britanni in the south and Brittoni in the north. On Pliny's map Britain is named, and much of Europe including Gaul, is named ...



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