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4

There are quite a few great sources on this topic. If by “how common”, you are implying that you are looking for hard, measurable and very-much-incomplete sample data (that you have to, of course, collate yourself), this is going to come from digitized historical court records like the Assize Courts that @Kobunite linked to, or from the proceedings of the ...


3

Ireland isn't "only a few miles away". The shortest sea crossings from Wales are Fishguard–Rosslare and Holyhead–Dublin, which are both 60 miles (100km). Scotland is closer: Portpatrick–Bangor is about 20 miles (35km). South-west England is about twice as far from Ireland as Wales is. The Romans never had sustained control of Scotland ...


6

To invade Ireland, the Romans would first have needed to gain full control of either Wales or the Clyde estuary in Scotland, something they never succeeded in doing. The Romans very much wanted to conquer Ireland, because the Irish were a constant source of weapons and "rebellibus" support to the Scots and Welsh for attacks on Roman communities. During the ...


12

Ireland was not a threat to Rome By the time the Romans had reached Britain, their empire covered most of western Europe and their resources were becoming stretched. For most of the time they spent in Britain, they were more concerned with holding on to what they had rather than expanding further. Caesar invaded Britain in BCs 55 & 54 to see what was ...


-2

The Stone of Destiny, brought to Scotland by the Gaels and on which all Scottish Monarchs have sat to be crowned, has been geologically tested to have originated in Israel/Palestine. This appears to suggest a much earlier origin and location and possibly a much earlier split in the Celtic language, as the Brythonic speakers seem to have always been more ...


6

At the risk of being pedantic, it is worth noting that some parts of the three counties traditionally included in the province of Ulster were transferred to the newly created Northern Ireland. However, the overall thrust of your question is correct - the traditional province of Ulster was divided by the Partition of Ireland. The shape of modern Northern ...



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