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5

RI Swamp Yankee has provided a good answer however I find some aspects lacking from the otherwise decent answer. Mongols and Islam When talking about Mongols, one has to remember that later Khans of Ilkhanate and Golden horde converted to Islam and thus their trends and traits were absorbed into wider Islamic hegemony especially in their domains which ...


3

As per T.E.D's suggestion, to summarize the detailed answer I have posted already, following are main points: Safavids main target was the Sunni Muslim community of Iran which was the majority of Iranian population at inception of Safavid Empire. They considered them possible fifth column since main rivals of Safavids were Sunni Ottomans who were expanding ...


0

There were attempts to convert Armenians and Georgians too. While The persecution and virtually complete annihilation of Sunni Muslims in Iran by Safavid Empire is well known and undisputed even by Modern Iranian historians, the treatment of non-Muslim minorities requires deeper discussion. Reasons behind Ismaili Conversion Campaign First of all, we have ...


4

This is a classic case of false depiction which is not uncommon in fiction. The Hadith (Sayings of Muhammad) quoted in the question you linked is correct and Muslims follow the "Sahih Hadiths" (Which are the ones they consider correct and are cited from either Bukhari, Tirmazi, Ibn Maja or Nisai, the four "correct books" of Hadith). To quote it again: ...


6

Muslim trader presence certainly existed in the Byzantine Empire. I'd split my answer into three parts: Documented Facts: Quoting from the main source: Muslim presence in the Eastern Roman Empire can be traced back to very foundation of Islam in the 7th century but at some later point the Muslims were regarded as a quasi community and appropriate ...



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