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7

The invasion of Italy was a huge psychological success for the Allies. It caused the Italian government to overthrow Mussolini in a coup d'etat and join the Allies. One (admittedly the weakest) of the Rome-Berlin-Tokyo Axis had fallen before the Allies lost one of their major powers (Britain, the Soviet Union or China) to the Axis. From this point of view, ...


5

This drifts into a science Stack Exchange question somewhat, but consider the following: Until the advent of PVC pipes, stone aqueducts would have insulated the original (cool) temperature better than exposed metal piping. Unexposed piping would have been about equivalent to stone depending on ground temperature. If I recall correctly Roman aqueducts ...


4

Italy was (and is) an industrial and financial powerhouse - Mussolini was an ineffective wartime leader, but the resources his nation lent Hitler were essential to continuing the war. Removing Italy from the Axis sphere of influence was high on the list of Allied strategic goals - remember, the Allies' game plan was to deny Germany the means to make war in ...


3

What I think happened here is a case of gradual exaggeration. Benito Mussolini, who started the Italian Fascist party, was a socialist. But he got kicked out of the socialist party for supporting Italian involvement in WWI. Since he was no longer in the socialist party, he started his own organization, which eventually became the fascist party. Although ...


3

Italy was an ally of Germany, not an occupied country (except for the North in 1943-1945, which was not, technically, occupied). They made, e.g., Fiat_G.55 in Turin which saw action against the allied air forces. In general, Germany had the full use of the whole of French, Czech &c industries (except for those which were destroyed by allied bombing ...


3

The claim is true if we take "Italian" as meaning modern standard Italian. At the time of Italy's unification, what we know today as "Italian" was more of a literary language than a vernacular one. The 2.5% figure cited is a lower bound figure, but the higher end only goes up to 12% or so. Either way, only a small minority of Italy's inhabitants spoke it. ...


3

IT didn't exist at the time, so technically the answer is zero, none. If you mean companies that are currently IT companies, and created and sold equipment explicitly for the purpose of use in the holocaust, that'd exclude any company outside German occupied Europe, Spain, Italy, Sweden, and Switzerland, as there simply was no trade during the holocaust ...


2

Although it is true Italy felt as "The Odd Man Out" with its alliance with Germany and Austria-Hungary, there are some cultural ties with that of France and Italy that cannot be overlooked. The basic foundation of the "Romance Languages," religion, and history. I also feel that the "Entente" powers were less of a threat to Italy. France also was preoccupied ...


1

Semaphore’s answer is largely, but not entirely correct. The standard Italian language is based mainly on the written language used by late-mediaeval authors like Dante and Petrarca. They wrote in Florentine as it was then spoken, but modern Florentine has moved on from this. For the example in standard Italian you write “la casa” and pronounce it as it is ...


1

An alliance with the Sardinia-Piedmont was a good way to weaken the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and to win an potentially strong ally on the Alpine south-east border of France, betting on the unification of the Italian peninsula by the kingdom of Sardinia-Piedmont. A weak Sardinia-Piedmont Kingdom meant that France could be threatened by an invasion from the ...


1

Because with Sardinia-Piedmont comes the House of Savoy, a powerful political and trade dynasty with far-reaching influence throughout Europe.


1

Water mainly came via the Avens river Nar (that goes into Tiber) from lacus velinus near Reate. Its water came from mountains. Marius Curius Dentatus has drained the waters of the lake into the river Nar. In doing so, he created the marmore waterfalls: The Marmore Falls, extolled during the centuries for its beauty, appears like a roaming water column ...


1

Why Tuscaky of all places? In 1608 in Aleppo Fakhr-al-Din had signed a treaty with the Medici's Tuscany envoyees in Aleppo, so it was the Medici who seeked him first. In 1613 he had already started to struggle for independance from the Ottoman empire and he was at great risk. So he fled to Tuscany where he was welcome in Florence by Cosimo II who hosted him ...


1

Firstly it need to be clarified the nature of Italian treaty with Gemany and Austria: this was just and only a "non aggression treaty and mutual protection in case of attack" Germany and Austria have never been attacked, on the opposite they ignited the war. Secondarily needs to be said that Italy was re-united after centurues of occupation from Spain, ...



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