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8

I suppose the answer to your question is that, firstly, we definitely have to consider the aid by the U.S. after the war. Like, well, Japanese children asking for the American soldiers for chocolates etc, but the real booster in terms of the economic impact was probably due to the korean war. SCAP officials believed economic development could not ...


-4

The economy of Japan was in terrible shape. There were shortages of all essentials such as food and housing. The functioning Japanese government had little in the way of financial resources. The tax system was not operative and the public had little to tax. The U.S. government provided food supplies to the Japanese government which sold them to raise funds ...


5

Actually, I can say Japanese ( being happening to be native Japanese well, ) did not use the crossbows almost at all throughout its entire history except for shortly before 10th century. ( I am sorry this is Japanese and Wiki site ) According to the above source, along with the increase of Samurai's gradual role throughout Japan ( up until, say, at least ...


2

The O-Yumi, a large crossbow essentially acting as a siege weapon was used, but the typical crossbow itself was eschewed; the samurai did not like the crossbows as much as their Yumi, which were also considered spiritual tools. Additionally, there were complaints about the issues in training soldiers to use the crossbows and technological issues present in ...


4

Well, I happened to be native Japanese. Simply saying, the answer is because the relationship after the WW1, Japanese Imperial Army aggressively started invading China ( Second-Sino War )., which had them expanded so deep into China, whereas, the U.S and its allies were pressuring more and more on Japanese about it. ( Even Imperial Japan relied heavily on ...


12

Let me illustrate @StuartAllan's answer: if they hear "Japanese castle", people think about this: And while that is pretty and impressive, it will of course be a heap of smoking rubble after no more than a few hits from a battleship's guns. But what the attacking military is really up against is this: and laying waste to it is gonna take some time... ...


3

During Russian-Japan war and WWI the Japan wanted to be a member of the "civilized" nations club. And often behaved according to its rules. During the WWII, Japan already was the member of a very different club, the German-Italy-Japan alliance, that STRUGGLED against that old club and its rules were despised or neglected at best.


24

This is probably a slightly garbled account of the destruction of Shuri Castle in Okinawa. During the Second World War's Battle of Okinawa, the battleship USS Mississippi shelled the historical Ryukyu palace for three days prior to its capture by US marines. At 0718 on May 25, the Mississippi began a murderous onslaught with her 5 and 14-inch guns that ...


6

I do not know of this incident. Check naval archives or with a librarian in naval archives. This does, however, seem highly likely. The castle itself would be a smoldering ruin (as it was almost entirely wood, designed in such a way to better absorb earthquakes). The stone/Earthwork, on the other hand, would be extremely resilient to artillery fire. Getting ...


20

This modern tradition has its roots in the First World War, when Japan entered on the side of the Allies following the Anglo-Japanese Alliance. Japan's entry carried an initial, overt goal of restoring the German Kiautschou Bay Concession to Chinese sovereignty. The Siege of Tsingtao, the administrative centre of the German concession, ended in the ...


1

Japan has spent over a century in constant fighting when Hideyoshi unified the country. Typically Japanese conquerors take land from the defeated and reward their own followers. But with all of Japan conquered, there wasn't any new land to give away. Conquering Korea solves both problems. Unfortunately for Hideyoshi, the invasion failed.


-1

The Japs got their asses handed to them at Kalkin Gol in 1939. They had no defense against Russian armored warfare. Also, Hitler had made alliance with Stalin in 1939. Also, the Japs were completely distracted by fighting the Chinese.


2

I found the answer on page 267 in: Oshiro, George M. “The End: 1929-1933.” In Nitobe Inazô: Japan’s Bridge Across the Pacific, edited by John F. Howes, 253–78. Boulder: Westview Press, Inc., 1995. “His last major appearance to a wider audience was an address to the Institute of International Affairs at Pasadena. He gave an address entitled, ‘A Japanese ...



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