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0

I recently got a sword with a mark that looks like the sakura mark on the bottom far right of the picture of crests, not sure how to put a picture on here but can anyone tell me about my sword?


-1

As NSNoob has stated, the Japanese did do very individually, and in small groups when barely adequately supplied. Their land forces normally did so well that their reputation alone took Okinawa and the Philippines at the start of the war. In fact, the fighting soldier is the last link in a long supply chain (logistics), involving the entire industrial ...


11

Japan had a disadvantage in heavy equipment, especially artillery and ships artillery. Many Japanese soldiers were killed in heavy bombardments. After the early battles (e.g. Guadalcanal), Japan seldom bombarded or bombed American soldiers. In some ways, the Japanese casualty rate was not that much higher than that of the Americans. If you take casualties ...


17

I wan to supplement NSNoob's answer with some more information on Japanese small arms. They lacked the firepower which the Americans could bring down, firepower which is very important in obscured and close range jungle fighting. Compared to the Chinese, their primary land opponent, the Japanese army fared fine. This is something very important to remember, ...


6

My uncle was a Marine in these battles. His generation spoke very little about the war. He was in the Pacific. One day we were discussing wars. He turned to me and said, "You know we did not take prisoners...". There were many reasons for this. 1) There was no place to put or hold prisoners. 2) You had to be constantly on alert with Japanese prisoners since ...


52

First of all, Japanese Forces were by no means inferior to their enemies in terms of fighting spirit or training. Beyond a doubt, No nation in WW2 had soldiers of such fanatical devotion in her service as Japan did, who actively sought out Gyokusai (Glorious death). Their mindset could be explained in Japanese martial song, Umi Yukaba: If I go away to ...


0

In large part, it was due to Japan's choice of allies in the two world wars. (In both cases, Japan was a "junior partner.") In World War I, Japan's main ally was Britain. That country preached (but didn't always practice), the concept of "fair play." Nevertheless, Japan accepted this "Western" concept in order to fit in, because Britain's allies ...


3

I get the impression that the answer is indeed "We don't really know." This page summarizes a 1970s article by Beatrice Bodart, which I was able to find on JSTOR (free to read online if you sign up for an account): http://www.jstor.org/stable/2384071?seq=26#page_scan_tab_contents Rikyu's execution was apparently rather surprising to a number of ...


10

The first set is a Japanese 10-yen banknote issued in 1946, during Allied occupation of Japan. The second set is a one peso banknote issued in 1943 in occupied Philippines by the Japanese government. The third set is a 1 shilling Oceanian Pound banknote issued in 1942, also by the Japanese government, and intended for use in various occupied British and ...



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