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1

Early Japan had close relations with early Korea. In eras before the dawn of really good and accurate history, those relations may have involved at least one Korean conquest of at least some parts of Japan and/or at least one Japanese conquest or colonization or overlordship over at least one part of Korea. Naturally, nationalistic Korean and Japanese ...


-1

The Qing Dynasty were not truly "Han" so while I would not call them Samurai in the sense of a "way of being" to say they weren't militaristic would be an understatement. You would have to do your research on this matter to devise your own conclusions. The only thing I recall is that the "Manchu's" had a highly advanced form of communication that allowed ...


-1

Not a myth, a fact. For 1800 years in the Silla kingdom, aka Slusa, they pre-date samurai. By the examples I've seen in writings, their armor looks as if the samurai copied them. In fact, they have code of 5 rules of conduct governing them from Buddhist and historical archives.


1

No, there was no way to tell. If a confrontation occurred, there were laws that dictated how the parties involved were supposed to announce themselves to each other. Note that in the period in question the old samurai system was starting to break down.


1

There are two forms of address that might be used: oyakata-sama and tono. Tono is somewhat less formal. If speaking about him in the third person, a person might say watakushitachi no tono ("our lord"), or even his name with -sama. In some cases, well-known figures had popular nicknames.


1

The only documented change of territory that I can find references for is the annexation of Tanu Tuva, which was occupied by the Red Army in 1921 as stablished as an "independent" People's Republic under Soviet control, and formally annexed it in 1944. Later on, during the Sino-Soviet split which led to the Sino-Soviet war, China made some claims against ...


0

Certainly the answer is hard. Maybe we can separate it in two main zones. One is Mongolia and the other one is Dalian (also named Dairen or Port Arthur). Before 1921 Mongolia was under influence of China, while after that date the influence went to the Soviet Union. Dairen is a port that was occupied by several countries during XIX and XX centuries. After ...


6

In addition to the points already raised by @TomAu and @DevSolar... The Pacific lend-lease route skirted the problem by officially being handled by the Soviets. Supervision and routing was handled by the Soviets. Cargo was loaded into Soviet flagged ships, many US ships were handed over to the Soviets. Since ships on the route might be inspected by the ...


4

Japan had a five year non-Aggression Pact with the Soviet Union (which the Soviets broke in 1945 after four years). Attacking Russian shipping would have been an act of war, and Japan didn't really want or need a "third" enemy. Japan feared that the Americans would use Soviet territory to launch air strikes or "stage" an invasion if it provoked Russia ...


9

Why should they? Destroying those supplies would require the commitment of forces Japan did not have to spare, with little to show for it. If a country Japan was at war with -- the USA -- insists on shipping war supplies to a country Japan was not at war with, why should Japan mind? Whether those supplies reached Russia or not did not make a difference ...


3

Under the Meiji Constitution of Imperial Japan, the Prime Minister - like all Ministers of State - were technically appointed by the Emperor solely on his own discretion. In practice, appointments were always made on the recommendations of the genrō, a clique of prominent elder statesmen who had orchestrated the Meiji Revolution. Whenever a vacancy arose, ...


2

The Taisho era saw a limited "democratization" of the selection of Prime Minister. For instance, there was the 1918 appointment of Hara Takashi, the first "commoner" Prime Minister, because of the pressures on the nobility caused by the "rice riots." Hara was a "meritocrat" who had served at various levels of the bureaucracy, as well as in the legislature. ...


3

Japan did not conquer Vietnam, it had already been conquered by the French. For most of the war Japan left the existing French colonial government in place and negotiated the rights to station troops there and move them through the country. Initially, Japan was only interested in Northern Indochina to cut off supplies to China. To this end they signed an ...


4

The Japanese conquered Singapore a much more visible, if smaller target with some 35,000 men (far fewer than the defenders). They also conquered the Philippines with a force of about 130,000 men, against mixed American-Filipino forces. That was because of two reasons. 1) the Japanese troops were better at jungle fighting than the French, British and ...


-4

Japan was only occupying small areas that had economic importance, not trying to control the whole country. Also, in world wars soldiers do not guff around. If civilians misbehave, they will just go in and machine gun everybody. When the U.S. was in Viet Nam, we put all sorts of political restrictions on the soldiers, such as not allowing them to shoot ...



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