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-1

Well the japanese atrocities and participation in World War II were the result of centuries of japanese being instructed in European universities, this assistance to European universities was to receive instructions on how to defend the interests of Europe in Japan and create a country for influence over China and the rest of Asia, geopolitically speaking, ...


0

While the original plan was to try for a negotiated peace from a position of strength, these negotiations never began for reasons Duncan has already laid out. However, there were attempts toward the end of the war. There was a camp within the Japanese leadership which argued for a negotiated surrender, but fears of what "unconditional surrender" would ...


5

Kantai Kessen (a variant of the Manhanian Doctrine) meant holding a solid perimeter of locations such as the Caroline islands, Marshall islands, Mariana Islands and Palau; and to wait for the enemy force to attack Japan. Having already suffered the effects of attrition from the Japanese perimeter the enemy force would be annihilated ending their threat in ...


1

I looked up Ienaga's book, which seems to be generally speaking a cerdible source. However, the pages where he discusses the 8th Route army and the Communist resistance to the Japanese in general (pp. 88-96) are actually not as well-documented as the rest of the book. His main argument is basically that the Communists were so successful in their ...


0

Alot of good answers so far but being this is more social science than provable facts, I would like to add a not so pretty point. Please don't shoot the messenger. Americans and Europeans due to racism never viewed the Japanese and other Asians as fellow race members, therefore their acts were never shocking and didn't garner much attention. Much like ...


-2

The answer is very simple and it's political. I'll avoid being long-winded in this but it has to do with socialism/communism. Even though Nazism and communism are two sides of the same coin (Nazism is national-socialism and communism is international-socialism), we've been brainwashed to believe they are actually the opposite. So, in post world war two, in ...


0

The Communist army did not oppose the Japanese in any meaningful way. One report they sent to Stalin listed casualties as 97% KMT and 3% 8th Route Army. Also, the Communists had no heavy weapons so they could not fight in the field anyway and simply had to retreat. Much of the fighting with the Communists was not even done by regular soldiers, but by ...


0

The Communists didn't use "better" tactics than the Nationalists. But they used different, specifically guerrilla tactics. For instance, both the Japanese and Nationalists fought along fixed lines. Then the idea was to break the enemy line, and once this was accomplished, you won the battle. On the other hand, the Communists would fight on an "all points" ...


5

Because they were not "better" or "more effective". There are generally poor reports of the People's Liberation Army's effectiveness against Japan during World War II. - Elleman, Bruce A. Modern Chinese Warfare, 1795-1989. Routledge, 2005. Keep in mind that comparisons are difficult to make because the Nationalists[1] bore the brunt[2] of all ...


1

Short answer: Soviet equipment was quite good, but their commanders stank. They got lucky that a few brilliant commanders survived the purges and were given a free hand at Khalkhin Gol. The problems of the Soviet army in WWII are more ones of leadership than material. They had the men, the equipment, and the tactics, but they had few good leaders to take ...


5

The Tripartite Pact explicitly excluded Russia; thus, given the The Soviet–Japanese Neutrality Pact, it is hard do imagine that Hitler expected a Japanese attack on Russia. Hitler thought that Russia was, for all practical purposes, already defeated; he declared war on the US saying that for all intents and purposes they are already fighting - this just ...


0

Both Japan and China had more pressing issues than a civil war half the world away. Note that long distance travel was harder and more expensive then. China wiki: Some Chinese joined the Brigades, and the majority of them eventually returned to China, while some went to prison or French refugee camps, and a handful remained in Spain Benton, Gregor; ...


0

The Japanese have complex attitudes that are difficult for an American (or anyone not Japanese) to understand. In essence they see the negative outcomes of the war, including the atomic bombings, as an environmental or external force which they themselves unleashed, sort of like a boy would regret stirring up a hornet's nest and being stung. The Japanese ...


9

In general, people fight over thrones because of the power it represents. For Japan, the tennō was not particularly powerful in the first place, but moreover lost secular power quite early in Japanese history. For most of the last 1,200 years, true political power was decoupled from the imperial title. Hence while many factions fought for power in Japan, ...


3

I think the best way to understand this would be to understand the cultural atmosphere in both China and Japan, which may provide some insights into this seemingly-unusual system of rule. In China, the Mandate of Heaven provided an ideology which professed the idea that the ability of rulers would be evaluated by the gods, and if a ruler was fit to rule, ...


-2

Most of Japanese history the emperor was a figurehead so there was no struggle to become an emperor, the real power belonged to a shogun for which position there was a lot of struggle indeed.



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