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In general, the treatment of Jewish POWs was at the "low end" of what it was for others of their "nationality." POWs who were Soviet Jews were treated very badly--because they were Soviets. Things were a bit worse for men who were both Soviets and Jews, but it was basically "Soviet" that determined their treatment. POWs who were American or British were ...


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The Jewish POWs of Western nations were separated from other POWs, moved to a separate camp at Berga and assigned more hard work. In about 2 months in one camp where the Jews were assigned mining works, 20% of them perished. This is compared to 2% of death rate among non-Jewish POWs. Fortunately to the imprisoned Jews, the war soon came to the end, so only ...


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Respectfully, I doubt that your question can be easily answered. Alas, my reply does not fit into a comment, so here you go. The Jewish tradition is alive in Jewish homes; it keeps evolving as we speak. Grab a Chabad edition of Haggadah Shel Pesach and you will find there many additions and elaborations by various Hassidic authorities over the last 2 ...


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British and American POW's were treated as POW's. Soviet Jewish POW's were usually treated as Jews, if their national origin could be determined. The justification was that Soviet Union did not sign the international convention about POW's. Of course, this was the official point of view, but actual treatment depended on commanders in the field. Official ...


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I will answer this in two parts, concerning historical tradition and actual historical documents. Historical Tradition and Writings None of the stories from the Hebrew Book of Names, which you know as the "Exodus" are found either in Egyptian sources or in later Greek sources describing Egyptian mythology with the exception of the account of Manetho. The ...



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