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19

The answer to this question depends somewhat on the kingdom, geography, and era. The ancient Achamaemenid Empire of Persia (Iran) was arguably the first true empire in history, and spanned a sizeable amount of territory. It made use of regularly stationed outputs with stables always containing well-fed and well-rested horses, for messengers to quickly get ...


11

Usually the ruler would divide the kingdom up into smaller territorries and appoint someone to be the leader for that territory. This has historically been a pretty common practice. From the Zhou Dynasty in China to the Roman Empire we can see examples of this. In addition, when you look at medieval kingdoms in England, France, and Germany, the monarchs ...


9

If one interprets this question as Why were the Merovingians so reviled at the peak of their power?, then the answer is easy: they weren't. At the peak of their power, the frankish kingdoms were the most powerful geopolitical entities in Western Europe, were recognized as such and their kings were treated accordingly. The early Carolingians reviled the ...


8

There is as far as I know no known historical record of anyone with no legal claim to a kingdom or other significant administrative territory (ie not just a farm or manor or other owned area) winning that territory in one-on-one combat with the sovereign of that territory or his representative, without having an army to back him up. And why would there be? ...


7

It seems most likely to me it would have been a local Sept leader, or at best a Earl or Laird, who got run out of his territories in the course of typical Scottish infighting. Over generations of retelling this guy could easily have been eventually promoted all the way to a "King", as it makes the family's origins sound more respectable. You would be ...


6

The country was England, and "proved son" in this context means "legitimate son." Leofric probably had many sons, but only one by his lawful spouse, Lady Godiva. More to the point, he had affairs with a bunch of other women, who produced sons that may or may not have been his. The more important issue (absent today's DNA tests) is: was Lady Godiva's son ...


3

There have been no studies that I am aware of and history seems to indicate that there is not a correlation between longevity and frequency of wars. Whether or not a nation goes to war is dependent on many factors that have nothing to do with a given ruler's age. A decision to go to war can be based upon being attacked by another nation, desiring natural ...


3

This question is difficult because it is not clear what monarchy is absolute and whether such elected office should be called monarchy rather than something else (i.e., dictatorship). One of the basic features of monarchy is inheritance of the office. As such, all elected monarchs are quite borderline cases. That said, I can name the following cases upon ...


2

The kingdom of Sarawak, 500 000 pop., won by Sir Charles Vyner Brooke, later "white Raja of Sarawak" "With little more than his 140-ton sloop and a bit of help from a British warship, he made himself Rajah of Sarawak, a kingdom of deep jungle and broad rivers on the island of Borneo." ...


1

I don't know that the Merovingians were always reviled. According to Paul Freedman, even when they were quite weak and ineffective as rulers, they still enjoyed the prestige that accrued from having "the blood of Clovis [flowing] in their veins". Clearly, Clovis at least was still revered several generations after his death. Freedman suggests that the ...



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