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German.Stackexchange: Is there a reason why Germany (Deutschland) is called so many different things in other European languages? English.Stackexchange: Why does Germany's English name differ from its German name? History.Stackexchange: Why do some countries call Germany "Alman" too? Wikipedia: Names of Germany Because of Germany's ...


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The Wikipedia article on this is quite detailed. In short, Germany was never conquered by the Roman Empire, so several tribes maintained their identity as well as the Germanic language. On top of that, you have Germany's central location, out of all those factors the different names emerged based on mostly 5 different origins. Deutsch - from the Germanic ...


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Why Germany is known in world in a diverse way? I believe this has to do with different nature of encountering Germans when it came to other nations. Germany has a more important strategic location than France does. France is in the Western most reach of the Continent while Germany is in the center and had more dealings with Slavs in the East, Latins in ...


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Actually the border between Germanic and Romance languages never correlated closely with any political borders until modern nationalistic governments forced schooling in the national languages. And it still includes at least two multi-lingual countries, Belgium and Switzerland. People preferred to speak the language that everyone else in their area spoke ...


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The Franks were a German tribe, speaking a Germanic language. They conquered part of the Roman Empire roughly corresponding to modern-day France. However, the common folk in that area spoke Latin, and never stopped just because their ruling class was now German. Over time their Latin language drifted until it became the language we now call "French". ...


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Defense of German heritage against Romans The biggest reason for how the lands east of the Rhine retained their German identity (unlike the Gauls of modern day France who lost their Celtic identity) is the Battle of Teutoburg Forest where the Germans won a decisive victory against Roman invasions. After this battle, the Romans never seriously attempted to ...


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It is certainly possible. Obviously such a thing would require the monk to learn the Norse language, which would mean it would be years before he would be teaching them anything that required language to convey. Educated slaves rarely appear in the sagas and in fact slaves are rarely mentioned at all for that matter, unlike, for example, in Roman culture ...


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The Mongols were a relatively backward people in the scholastic sense of the word, and hired conquered scholars to educate them. The Mongols were also very tolerant of most religions in their vast empire, and had priests help "pacify" their various peoples.


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There are two forms of address that might be used: oyakata-sama and tono. Tono is somewhat less formal. If speaking about him in the third person, a person might say watakushitachi no tono ("our lord"), or even his name with -sama. In some cases, well-known figures had popular nicknames.


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The matter of the languages of Basque country, Catalonia and Galicia difference with the rest is due to historical factors. The Spanish or Castilian is the main language of Spain because is the most spoken and born in former kingdom of Castilla. Spain is the union of Spanish kingdoms. The Spanish language is the latinised language of the ancient Iberians. ...


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The Encyclopedia of the Arab-Israeli Conflict: A Political, Social, and Military History: The First Zionist Congress's official language, both spoken and written, was German, but many delegates also spoke Yiddish (Hebrew-German vernacular), the language of Ashkenazic Judaism, and a Yiddish-like German known as Kongressdeutch.


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Any present-tense questions you have probably should be asked on the linguistic stack. I can tell you that historically the language was not written, and according to Wikipedia most speakers even today don't read and write in that language, due to the paucity of written works. So any written form you come across is probably used almost entirely by ...


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The "Germanization" process really only got underway after the unification of Germany in 1870. That means you have a period of only 40 years in which Germany is actively trying to suppress Polish culture. And in practice it wasn't very thorough. I think you vastly underestimate the opportunity for and existence of "high-level" communication and culture in ...


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By the time of partition, Poles had strong cultural tradition and literature. Suppressing such language and culture is difficult or impossible. You say children were educated in German". I am sure they were educated also in Polish, even if this happened at home. Certainly there were many well educated Poles by 1918, and overwhelming majority could speak ...


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France and various Habsburg lands including Austria were political and diplomatic enemies and often at war during almost 300 years from about 1477 to about 1750, and again for most of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. During that period French became the most prestigious living language in western Europe and was a second language to most members ...


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The emperors have often spoken many languages and Hungarian was an important one so one may find numerous Habsburg rulers who spoke Hungarian, too. For example, Maximillian II fluently spoke Spanish, French, Latin, Hungarian, and Italian. Maria Theresa spoke German, Italian, French, Spanish, Latin, Czech and she added Hungarian before she became the ...



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