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18

You neglect the fact that the 'indigenous' population of France before the Great Migrations (of mainly Germanic tribes) was Gallo-Roman, and by the end of the Roman era (5th century AD), the populace spoke a dialect of Vulgar Latin, which evolved into a distinct "Gallic" Latin over the following centuries. Note however that the ancient Celtic (Gaulish) ...


9

1995 = MCMXCV. The rules are: first triad: I, V, and X: I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X Then all is repeated with: second triad: X, L, and C third triad: C, D, and M You can't use letters outside of their "triad": So, IM for 999 is wrong. CXC for 190 is correct, and 195 is CXCV (not CVC). You should write numbers in decreasing order: ...


8

Ancient Romans used the word Aethiops/Aethiopem which was derived from Greek Αἰθίοψ ‎(Aithíops). But the other answer isn't right when it says that the word Aithiops had no meaning except for the land of "Ethiopia". Instead, the word is a combination created from αἴθω ‎(aíthō, “burn”) + ὤψ ‎(ṓps, “face”). So the Greco-Roman word for the blacks was ...


5

As backup for Noldorin's point, note that the (French-speaking) Normans conqured England in 1066 and made French the country's official language for centuries. This didn't really change the fact that the vast majority of Englishmen spoke only English, and still do (although with a lot of French loan-words for things mostly of concern to the upper-classes). ...


5

The list can be found in the original Latin on page 68 of this edition of the Ystoria Mongolarum, about 1/3 of the way down the page. On Page 269 (through 295) are C. Raymond Beazley's Notes on Hakluyt's Version of Vincent of Beauvis' Abridgement of Carpini, discussing the text. On Page 278 at the top we have a discussion of India magna (noting that ...


4

In my earlier answers on similar questions, What are some examples of racism in pre-modern literature? How did people categorize each other in the middle ages, how did racism work? I expressed the opinion that neither Romans nor Greeks nor Jews (of the time when the Bible was written) had words to designate races. Race is a modern invention. I challenged ...


3

This question has no definite answer because there was no alternative. In the period between 17s and 19s century all science everywhere in Europe switched from the Latin to the native languages. This process was inevitable with the raise of nation-states. The argument that you cite is not valid, because before that time all educated people learned Latin. In ...


3

Wikipedia has separate articles on the different ranks, but they are not (as of this writing) systematically categorized. For example: Illustris or Gloriosissimus. The Illustris article refers to Jones, A.H.M., The Later Roman Empire 284-602, A Social, Economic, and Administrative Survey (Oxford: Blackwell, 1964, repr. Johns Hopkins UP, 1986) which is a ...


2

The Roman numeral system was "designed" for calculating using an abacus. One wrote out the number by the values of each channel (we picture an abacus as a wood frame with wires holding columns of beads for counters but the Romans would usually have used a table, a "TV-tray" if you will, covered with ample sand, running a finger down for the lines, and ...


2

This is kind of a matter of opinion, but for what its worth, I don't think the change was particularly significant. First of all, it happened very gradually and during the time when most books were written in Latin, most anyone with even a basic education could read Latin. So, it was just not that big of a deal. I think part of the problem is that the ...


1

Maybe - but the link is tenuous, at best, I'd say - and may not even be causal. The other answers correctly point out that, historically, science was the province of educated men, and these men would have learnt Latin and thus been able to read and communicate ideas (think Isaac Newton). However, many of the technological advances of the English Industrial ...


1

Anyone with an advanced education in either the secular or religious fields would know Latin. It was what most literature taught was written in, and all the religious texts.



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