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1

Maybe - but the link is tenuous, at best, I'd say - and may not even be causal. The other answers correctly point out that, historically, science was the province of educated men, and these men would have learnt Latin and thus been able to read and communicate ideas (think Isaac Newton). However, many of the technological advances of the English Industrial ...


2

This is kind of a matter of opinion, but for what its worth, I don't think the change was particularly significant. First of all, it happened very gradually and during the time when most books were written in Latin, most anyone with even a basic education could read Latin. So, it was just not that big of a deal. I think part of the problem is that the ...


3

This question has no definite answer because there was no alternative. In the period between 17s and 19s century all science everywhere in Europe switched from the Latin to the native languages. This process was inevitable with the raise of nation-states. The argument that you cite is not valid, because before that time all educated people learned Latin. In ...


0

The fact is that the Greeks and Romans did not have any knowledge of Africa south of the Sahara, so they could not have had any name for its inhabitants.


8

Ancient Romans used the word Aethiops/Aethiopem which was derived from Greek Αἰθίοψ ‎(Aithíops). But the other answer isn't right when it says that the word Aithiops had no meaning except for the land of "Ethiopia". Instead, the word is a combination created from αἴθω ‎(aíthō, “burn”) + ὤψ ‎(ṓps, “face”). So the Greco-Roman word for the blacks was ...


4

In my earlier answers on similar questions, What are some examples of racism in pre-modern literature? How did people categorize each other in the middle ages, how did racism work? I expressed the opinion that neither Romans nor Greeks nor Jews (of the time when the Bible was written) had words to designate races. Race is a modern invention. I challenged ...


-2

They used the Greek word, Aethiops meaning a person occupying Aethiopia, which at that time was considered to be all of lower Africa.



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