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12

Ancient Romans used the word Aethiops/Aethiopem which was derived from Greek Αἰθίοψ ‎(Aithíops). But the other answer isn't right when it says that the word Aithiops had no meaning except for the land of "Ethiopia". Instead, the word is a combination created from αἴθω ‎(aíthō, “burn”) + ὤψ ‎(ṓps, “face”). So the Greco-Roman word for the blacks was ...


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In my earlier answers on similar questions, What are some examples of racism in pre-modern literature? How did people categorize each other in the middle ages, how did racism work? I expressed the opinion that neither Romans nor Greeks nor Jews (of the time when the Bible was written) had words to designate races. Race is a modern invention. I challenged ...


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What you're actually looking for: J. N. Adams Latin Sexual Vocabulary. I bet I could find another, but I don't know off the top of my head.


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I'd say Half-Uncial (3rd Century AD) and Carolingian (9th Century AD) scripts; as it says in the Wikipedia text for the latter, Clear capital letters and spaces between words – norms we take for granted – became standard in Carolingian minuscule [...] So it was the first time both capitals and minuscules were used in a standard way (instead of ...


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About 10,000 ancient texts survive, which would require around 4-8 m2 of floor space stacked 1.8m high. The texts would be primarily from the Roman and Greek periods. http://www.roger-pearse.com/weblog/2009/10/26/reference-for-the-claim-that-only-1-of-ancient-literature-survives/ According to Gerstinger (1948) p.10, about 2000 Greek authors were known ...


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I think Mustang's estimate is a gross overestimate. We are talking about surviving books. Loeb Classical Library has a stated goal to publish everything that survived from ancient Greece and Rome. Of course this is far from everything. They do not publish much of mathematics, astronomy, astrology and other special disciplines. (But this is not much in terms ...



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