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26

The United States Supreme Court ruled unilateral secession unconstitutional while commenting that revolution or consent of the states could lead to a successful secession NOTE: The Supreme Court ruling was after the Civil War Legality: The principle of legality is the legal ideal that requires all law to be clear, ascertainable and ...


20

Probably not. It seems to have existed as a traditional right, but was almost never exercised. Wikipedia denies the existence of this right, citing Albrecht Classen's The Medieval Chastity Belt. Snopes concurs, citing Encyclopedia Britannica, 15th ed., 10.610: [The droit du seigneur] is paralleled in various primitive societies, but the evidence of ...


18

Let me answer as a German with an analogy. You can compare the German speed limit to weapon ownership in US. Any party suggesting introduction of a general speed limit would conduct political suicide and face serious debates with the automobile lobby and voters (most workplaces here come from this branch). Most rational arguments points towards a speed ...


17

Its important to start talking about copyright by explaining what it is. In the USA, it is not an artist's natural right to his own work, or somesuch. It is not a property right. It is instead a bargain. We (the public) allow someone to have a temporary monopoly on reproduction of a work, and we gain (eventually) more Public Domain works. So you may now ...


16

The United States is a federation where, in theory, the States delegate certain powers to the federal government (USG) which they could not effectively exercise individually (such as defense), while reserving all other powers to themselves and the people. Due to reserved powers, internal matters like labor regulations would generally fall under State ...


16

Oh, but it is in the Constitution - implicitly. The it "isn't anywhere in the constitution" argument is frequently popular to different groups on different topics, but in this case at least has no legal basis in jurisprudence. The judicial Power of the United States, shall be vested in one supreme Court ... The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, ...


14

I believe this is referring to the gag rule (aka: Pickney Resolution 3) of the US House, adopted in 1836. It read: Resolved, That all petitions, memorials, resolutions, propositions, or papers, relating in any way or to any extent whatever to the subject of slavery, or the abolition of slavery, shall, without being either printed or referred, be ...


12

The phrasing is a bit unfair, I think (and probably a misquote, as it turns out). The first important international patent agreement didn't exist until 1883, and the United States signed on 4 years later. Before that, all countries were free to discriminate against foreigners in patent applications. Even with that agreement, a person wanting patent ...


11

You have several ways to go about it. First, a set of powerful nations will recognise and guarantee the independence up to going to war over the state. This is generally the peaceful way as everyone comes to an agreement that this is what should happen. Some countries (such as Poland) were re-made after a war and given independence again. India could ...


11

There are several types of repeals. First, there are partial repeals where a poorly crafted portion of a law causes problems. For example, the onerous 1099 reporting section of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) was repealed. The rest of the law remains intact so far but that portion was repealed. Another recent example would be ...


11

One modern document that is considered a body of laws concerning warfare and predates the Geneva Conventions, is the "Instructions for the Government of Armies of the United States in the Field, General Order № 100", issued by President Lincoln in April 24, 1863. It was prepared by Francis Lieber and its commonly called the Lieber Code or Lieber ...


10

Prohibition required a constitutional amendment, because the Federal government does not have the power to regulate intra-state commerce. The majority of states and many localities had already banned the sale of alcohol. The progressive and women's suffrage movements saw banning alcohol as a way to improve living conditions for women and children and reduce ...


10

To combat the KKK and other groups, the North placed the South under martial law. They pushed through legislation while the Southern states had no representation in Congress permanently freeing the slaves and giving them voting rights. Then an occupation force was sent to enforce it, since this was pretty much unpopular with everyone, not just the Klan. ...


10

There was a lawsuit between Frankfurt and Hanau which lasted some 212 years. In the late 16th century, a dispute broke out between the Free Imperial City of Frankfurt and its neighbour the County of Hanau over rights to a wine tithe. The tithe was formerly owed by the farmers of Hanau to the abbess of the White Ladies Convent in Frankfurt, but the city ...


9

prohibition of polygamy most certainly doesn't correlate with democracy. Polygamy was prohibited in the entire Christendom throughout Dark Ages and absolute monarchies - not exactly the best circumstances for Democracy. Same with USSR and Nazi Germany. On the other side of the matter, modern western democracies and USA are fairly obviously evolving into ...


9

Depending on your definition of corporation, you could claim that Venice and other merchant cities of Italy were akin to corporations. Guilds could well be said to have been pseudo corporations and the Templar orders a pseudo-bank. Corporations allow for a united front against competition, taxes, and a sharing of profits. The Merchant Adventurers of ...


9

Contrary to popular myth, cannabis is not legal in the Netherlands. But the current de facto liberal policy dates to 1976. In 1976 the Netherlands adopted a formal written policy of non-enforcement for violations involving possession or sale of up to 30 grams of cannabis. [1] (emphasis mine) That study I cited is worth perusing if you're interested in ...


9

Disney doesn't want the copyright over Micky Mouse to expire, so when the date is approaching, they "kindly ask" the government to extend it again. Micky has been created in 1928, so the copyright duration will always be at least (current year - 1928 + 1). Similarly, there has always been someone with similar interests and enough power to force this ...


9

Back in the days when women (let's be honest here, particularly middle to upper-class women) were not in the workforce, maternity leave was not much of an issue. It took until the 1990's when the changing demographics of the workforce, the increasing status of women, and the political parties in power, all aligned properly to allow for a push for maternity ...


9

To the victor the spoils. In other words, the victorious party gets to decide what is "acceptable". That's the long and short of it. In an era before "international laws of war" there was nothing that wasn't "acceptable" and the only thing that mattered was winning. Add a siege, your troops being away from home for years, living in horrible conditions camped ...


9

The longest running that I can find is the property dispute of Raja Rajkrishna Deb, which was started in 1833 and is as far as I can find still pending after 181 years.


9

The legal situation was not as clear as the question assumes, because neither of the reasons cited were valid at the time. While people often apply Salic Law to the dispute in 1328, this is ahistorical - Salic Law had long been defunct by then. Royal succession was not fixed in legislation, but instead shaped by customs that had evolved over the centuries. ...


8

The earliest instance of a "corporation" as we recognize them today has to be the Dutch East India Company which was established in 1602. The Dutch East India Company was the first to issue shares that were tradeable on a stock exchange in its company in part to raise capital for its operations. At the time of its founding similar trading companies focused ...


8

In the late part of 1858, Count Charles Montalembert of France was put on trial and prosecuted by the French government for writing an article titled "A Debate on India in the English Parliament". The French government took the position that certain passages of this article were "seditious and an outrage upon the existing Government" of France. (This link ...


8

Today's Louisiana, with its port of New Orleans, was the part of the Louisiana Territory that was most developed and populated when it was sold to America in 1803. Hence, the state was largely entrenched in its French ways. The LATER settlement by English speakers from the rest of the U.S. created a "bijudicial" system that retained a heavy French influence. ...


8

Yes. The Latin League was founded in 7th century B.C. by a set of Italian states. The capital city was Alba Longa. Delian League was founded in 5th century BC Peloponnesian League was formed between 6 and 4th centuries BC League of Corinth was formed during the winter of 338 BC/337 BC Achaean League existed between 280 BC and 146 BC In central, barbarian, ...


8

Before the war, only a limit of 30 km/h inside towns was in force, but no other general speed limits. In the Third Reich, there was a general speed limit of 40km/h inside of towns, and 80km/h outside. This was mostly to conserve resources for the war (and because several high ranking Nazis had been killed in accidents on the new Autobahnen). Being a ...


8

In his book "The Longest Struggle: Animal Advocacy from Pythagoras to Peta", Norm Phelps speaking about origins of animal protection refers to the times of Maurya Empire under Ashoka rules in 3rd century BCE, where it had mainly religious reasons. In his empire, not only hunting was banned, but also slaughter and eating of cattle, together with restrictions ...



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