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2

The "pleitos colombinos" the series of suits, decisions and appeals between the Crown of Spain and Christopher Colombus and his descendants (as well as between his descendants) lasted from 1516 until (at least) 1792, when the matter was still being argued before Spanish courts. This gets the year count up to 276. References: Mariano Colón de Toledo y ...


3

Prior to the Matrimonial Causes Act 1937 (so pre-1938), access to divorce in England and Wales was quite limited. It is correct to say that a divorce could not be granted on the grounds of imprisonment or insanity - but it also could not be granted on the grounds of cruelty (absent adultery), desertion, or simply both parties being fed up with one another. ...


5

Jesus was not a Roman citizen. He was not one of the provinciales because he was not born in Roman province (Iudaea). "The Closing of the Western Mind" by Charles Freeman, chapter 8, says he was born and lived almost entire life in Galilee, which was part of a "puppet state" ruled by a king (e.g., Herod Antipas). Jesus came to Iudaea between 29-33 CE, most ...


1

As far as I know, the Romans never practiced deportation as a punitive measure against provincials. Simply killing off an offender was the expedient and simple Roman way. P.S. A citizen under trial could go into voluntary exile before the verdict was handed, to escape forfeiture of property but that was (a) under the Republic (b) applied in practice only to ...


1

In the Aqueduct riots Pilate sent in the troops on a mob and many were slain - and it was explicitly said by Josephus that non-rioters were also killed. Pilate was hardly averse to treating potential unrest with severe force...and a claim to be King of the Jews is treason and a call for rebellion.


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There is no such thing as "Roman Statutory Law". The legal system in Rome was centered around magistrates, and their agents called lictors. Magistrates had imperium, which meant they had wide latitude to do whatever they wanted, especially in provinces like Judea. As far as your professor's claim that crucifixion was limited to slaves, that was normally ...



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