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As other answers have mentioned, there were state and local laws that prohibited alcohol before the Constitutional amendment. And there is the obvious fact that a Constitutional amendment is a more permanent measure than a normal law, which would require a more complex measure to overturn. (There may be a parallel to the moves in recent years to enshrine ...


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The Crown could not refuse assent without launching a coup d'etat against parliament in circumstances that would have produced outrage against the Crown sufficient to result in an election that would surely return a ministry bound to dismiss the existing Governor General, and, potentially, force a republic. Westminster inspired Crowns have generally sought ...


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To us, the Sedition Act may seem unthinkably contrary to American values. It did not seem this way to Federalists, so it should be no surprise that the Federalist majorities supported these bills. In fact, the Sedition Act seemed to many to be a liberal law: Ironically, the Sedition Act was actually a liberalization of the common law of seditious libel ...


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The important thing to know is that the passage of the Alien and Sedition Acts represented the "high water mark" of the Federalist Party. Put another way, it rose and fell with these two acts. The Federalists had always controlled the Senate, and the 1794 Congressional elections gave them control of the House of Representatives. Finally, in 1796, John Adams ...


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One of the important - and rarely mentioned - differences between serfs and slaves is that former, at least in Russian Emprie, could carry guns. And as the famous quote states, "The possession of arms is the distinction between a freeman and a slaves". Of course, I'm not claiming that serfs were actually free. Neither I claim that this epithet can be used ...



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