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13

Realistically speaking a reasonably knowledgeable Japanese person would've been able to spot Japan on a world map, based on the islands' relative position to Korea and China. This is probably true since at least the 400s. They were, after all, able to engage in extensive trade and diplomacy with the mainland. Their grasp of geography couldn't be that far off ...


11

The Romans were good surveyors. Vitruvius described surveying tools and methods in a book that was still used in the Middle Ages, hundreds of years after it was written. By laying out stakes at fixed distances and using a plumb with simple sighting rods, it is very easy to lay out squares, lines, triangles, etc., and to measure the distances between ...


8

General answer: it will probably depend what you define as "the shape". Ultimately, once landfall was made on opposite coasts (1820-1840), and land was proven to be there, it was a matter of looking at all the places a ship had sailed through without hitting anything, concluding that the coastline must be further south than that, and drawing in a dotted line ...


8

The technology to determine the narrowest point in northern England is as nothing compared to that necessary for supplying Roman towns with running water and baths, as with the Nimes Aqueduct in Southern France, shown here at the Pont du Gard crossing of Gardon River. The Fontaine d'Eure, at 76 m (249 ft) above sea level, is only 17 m (56 ft) higher ...


5

I'm sure there are better examples, but I'm particularly fond of the only pre-1453 map of Constantinople, which dates from 1422 (see below). Wikipedia has a list of old manuscript maps, which appear to date from the 7th to the 15th century, so if there are Byzantine maps to be found, they might be there.


5

A very interesting question, as it turns out. The coast of Antarctica wasn't definitively sighted until about 1820, so no globe until then would have featured it. I found this pocket globe made by Abel Klinger in I believe 18801 that shows the barest outline of some of the coast of Antarctica. Examining some globes from the same manufacturer in 1855, I can'...


5

Measuring, surveying, and map making are ancient practices by the Greeks, Romans, Egyptians, Druids, Chinese... pretty much everyone knew how to trace and measure lines and angles over a long distance. Surveying is based on geometry, in particular triangles, and that was all well known at the time. By the time Hadrian's Wall was begun (122 AD), Euclid's ...


5

As near as I can tell, it is standard Army practice to label hills in an operating area by their height in meters. That means for all those hills you listed, the number is their height. This is probably also why the important hills near the coast tend to have smaller numbers. This practice does not appear to have changed recently, so I'd assume it is still ...


3

Those measurements are in meters. The area around Łaguszów is about 160 meters above sea level. I do not see the divisions of 3.4 meters to which you are referring on the map. However, in old Germany there was local land measure called the rod ("ruthe") which was highly irregular and varied from place to place and could be anywhere from 3 to 5 meters in ...


3

I've found this wikipedia page, which is precisely the list of "things I have to check" for this investigation. It allowed me to raise the lower bound to be definitely 1984, and I doubt we can then get more precise than 1984-1990. Still, maybe I missed something, so better answers are welcome. Useful data Ouagadougou's nation is called Burkina (yes, they ...


3

A map manuscript of the world by the monk Cosmas Indicopleustes (Cosmas "the one who sailed to India") survives today: Wikipedia describes the map as follows: The map is oriented with north to the top. It shows a rectangular landmass in the middle of the World Ocean (Okeanos), reflecting what Cosmas thought was the "floor" of the tabernacle-shaped ...


2

Its possible I can narrow it down further, due to there being no red box in the Pacific for the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. That puts it at 1986 or later.


1

I hope the Wiki link in your post itself contains the map of the Sultan Empire in India. I have provided some links Which I have referred to know about History of Delhi and Sultan Empire. The Delhi Sultanate (1206-1526) History of Delhi Slave Dynasty Delhi Sultanate This may helps you. Thanks


1

There is a detailed administrative map of the German Empire on Wikimedia, and most small exclaves, such as Achberg, are visible, and their colour helps to see exclaves of which state they are. It is possible some of the smaller exclaves (smaller than a village) are not directly visible, but combined by Two Shed's answer, it should be possible to make an ...



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