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8

Here's a zoomed-in screenshot of a map I made using Harvard's Geospatial Library. As you can see in the left, the layer I chose was "Germany State Boundaries, 1914." The little exclave in the bottom center of the screen is Achberg. If you zoom in a little more, it is labeled, but I chose to stay a little further out so you could see the other exclaves. ...


7

Harvard possesses one of the United State's largest collection of maps. Recently, they have been working on digitizing the collection. People who know how to use this kind of stuff can probably do a lot with the online Geospatial Library. I went to a presentation given by Harvard's GIS team. If I ever find my notes, I'll expand this answer with the other ...


6

The Romans were good surveyors. Vitruvius described surveying tools and methods in a book that was used in the Middle Ages. By laying out stakes at fixed distances and using a plumb with simple sighting rods, it is very easy to lay out squares, lines, triangles, etc., and to measure the distances between different points. The Romans divided huge tracts of ...


5

Actually, I've found one already answered question, that gives some info on what I'm trying to find. Good online sources for historical maps Useful links from there are (sorted by usefulness): http://www.oldmapsonline.org/ http://www.euratlas.net/antique/cartography/index.html http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/ http://www.davidrumsey.com/ ...


5

I'm sure there are better examples, but I'm particularly fond of the only pre-1453 map of Constantinople, which dates from 1422 (see below). Wikipedia has a list of old manuscript maps, which appear to date from the 7th to the 15th century, so if there are Byzantine maps to be found, they might be there.


4

They symbolize the sizes of units (so if the flag represent a division with 10,000 people or an army with 200,000) On smaller maps you may also see dots or lines. .-squad ..-platoon I-Company II-Battalion III-Regiment X-Brigade XX-Division XXX-Corp XXXX-Army XXXXX-Army Group XXXXXX-Theather


3

A map manuscript of the world by the monk Cosmas Indicopleustes (Cosmas "the one who sailed to India") survives today: Wikipedia describes the map as follows: The map is oriented with north to the top. It shows a rectangular landmass in the middle of the World Ocean (Okeanos), reflecting what Cosmas thought was the "floor" of the tabernacle-shaped ...


3

I've found this wikipedia page, which is precisely the list of "things I have to check" for this investigation. It allowed me to raise the lower bound to be definitely 1984, and I doubt we can then get more precise than 1984-1990. Still, maybe I missed something, so better answers are welcome. Useful data Ouagadougou's nation is called Burkina (yes, they ...


2

Its possible I can narrow it down further, due to there being no red box in the Pacific for the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands. That puts it at 1986 or later.


1

The technology to determine the narrowest point in northern England is as nothing compared to that necessary for supplying Roman towns with running water and baths, as with the Nimes Aqueduct in Southern France, shown here at the Pont du Gard crossing of Gardon River. The Fontaine d'Eure, at 76 m (249 ft) above sea level, is only 17 m (56 ft) higher ...


1

There is a detailed administrative map of the German Empire on Wikimedia, and most small exclaves, such as Achberg, are visible, and their colour helps to see exclaves of which state they are. It is possible some of the smaller exclaves (smaller than a village) are not directly visible, but combined by Two Shed's answer, it should be possible to make an ...


1

The kind of software you are trying to make exists: http://www.clockwk.com/ It is quite convenient and detailed, and covers the period for which sufficient data are available. But it is not free. EDIT. To address some concerns expressed in comments. This is the web page of the person who made this software. I know him personally and the page is around for ...


1

It is called a portolan chart. The lines have no navigational purpose. They were used to copy the chart. The same pattern of lines is drawn on the copy as on the master and then the copyist draws the coastlines using the individual cells of the grid as a reference. For example, in the first chart you give, the lines are formed by drawing a great circle and ...



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