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18

Movies portray people as having separate beds to get around strict censorship laws which were derived from old religious traditions. In reality, there have been many such movements for and against sleeping together, and it appears to have gone in and out of style through the ages.


16

Not really. Generally speaking, most European women since married in their early to mid twenties, to men in their mid to late twenties. The age gap for the commoners, i.e. the vast majority of the population, were typically not large. Unfortunately the question declined to define how much younger is "much younger" supposed to mean, but most Europeans ...


6

The idea of romantic love has a long history, but whether or not actual family formation is affected by that idea is a different question. A historiographical tradition in the 1970s tied the rise of romantic love in practice to the rise of modern capitalism and individualism. However, historians now largely believe that romantic love influenced many medieval ...


6

It was probably always the norm, at least in a way that also tolerated concubines. The Ancient Greeks were of course descended from Proto-Indo-Europeans. As early as 1864, French historian Numa Denis Fustel de Coulanges reasoned in his magnus opus, La Cité antique, that marriages were monogamous from the earliest days of the Indo-European peoples. The ...


4

Yes, public opinion matches up with anti-miscegenation laws, except for along the Pacific Coast. First, let's look at a map of anti-miscegenation laws: So the northeast and north midwest had no such laws in the entire 20th century. The West mostly had these laws during the mid-20th century, but repealed them before the Loving decision in 1967. The entire ...


3

I think the question is a bit too broad. Mesoamerican cultures may have made this transition at a different time than South Pacific Islanders. Update: although I lack the scholarship to provide evidence, I strongly suspect that marriage among the lower classes was more about love and less about political advantage. Political advantage wouldn't have been ...


2

The question is different now and requires a new answer. Have you read Jack London's The People of the Abyss? Yes, commoners in England slept in one bedroom, and many of them lived in one room, too.


2

There is a book that goes into it: Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. Sadly, I haven't had a chance to read it yet. I heard the author interviewed at length about it, but it was years ago when it came out, so bear with me here (hopefully someone who has a copy for reference will answer). From what I remember of the discussions of it, ...


2

At least 3000 years ago, if you want to interpret Greek mythology and the Iliad from a 21st century perspective. Paris of Troy was given the job to judge which of three goddesses (Aphrodite, Athena, Hera) was the most beautiful. He chose Aphrodite because she bribed him, promising the love of Helen of Sparta. Ultimately this led to Paris ...


2

Have you looked up C.S.Lewis' "Allegory of Love: A Study in Medieval Tradition"? I started reading it, and right at the beginning he explains that most of the idea of "love" in medieval times is a result of at least one famous writing being misunderstood: Ovid's 'The Art of Love.' Instead of being taken satirically, as it should have been, -says Lewis,- ...


2

I'm surprised to hear of women marrying so late, since having children late could be an issue. But maybe they married late due to the fear of death in childbirth. I would also like to know what the differences could be in the different classes. Surely the age of marriage for the aristocracy could well be different to those of the peasant class. I don't ...


1

Others have already provided excellent information and cites. There are a couple other things to look at. There may actually be a proxy that you can use to fill in data that you can't directly obtain: the number of children a woman bears should be related to her marriage age. The larger the family size, the younger the marriage age. Another proxy might be ...


1

Why is it that the maiden name is traditionally dropped when a woman is getting married? Is this something that predates back many civilizations ago? Or is this a relatively newfound trend? Inheritable family names may be considered a relatively new trend, only dating back to the dawn of the Renaissance in Europe, that is, their use on a large scale ...



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