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15

The Charter Oath promulgated at the enthronement of Emperor Meiji of Japan on 7 April 1868 includes several parts that identify the reasons for the radical social restructure that followed the Meiji restoration and an indication of the motivations for the dissolution of the warrior class that had been a defining characteristic of Japanese society. ...


14

(A little background for others reading this post) In 1868 Emperor Meiji re-established imperial rule. To move Japan into the modern era, he encouraged his people to explore and learn from the more technologically advanced cultures of the world. Even in the late 1800s, English was the language of international commerce. Emperor Meiji's push to learn ...


10

Short Answer Roughly speaking, in the early decades after 1867: ~7% became educators ~16% became public servants ~25% became corporate employees the rest became unemployed or farmers Overview Most of them actually did not do particularly well. After the Meiji Restoration, the samurai became the new shizoku class and initially received stipends from ...


7

... and as Steven I think implies, the power of the samurai continued in the Japanese Army. This was one reason why the army had no problem doing all their evil in the name of the 'Emperor', while actually doing everything they could to ensure his opinion was never allowed to interfere. This reflected previous Japanese history when Emperors were puppets of ...


6

Commodore Matthew C. Perry's arrived in Edo bay, on the 8th of July, 1853 with a letter from American president Millard Fillmore. Fillmore's letter phrased his country's aims in modest terms; his overarching hope was simple that: the United States and Japan should live in friendship and have commercial intercourse with each other and that it would be ...


5

I think the biggest motivation for excluding women as successors is to limit the number of potential heirs and to concentrate power for the reigning sovereign. Furthermore the reasons against doing so are weak. Japanese Empresses First, a background of Japanese empresses. From Wikipedia: Empress Suiko (554–628), r. 593–628—first ruling empress Empress ...


5

After the Meiji-Restoration, Christianity, and all religions were legalized, and according to the article I read, were "promulgated." In 1890, after the Restoration, the wealthiest men (about 1% of the population), were allowed to vote for parliament. By 1925, all men were allowed. http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2298.html ...


4

None of the contemporary accounts I have read, such as that of Francis L. Hawks (1861), which is more or less the official account of the missions, make any mention of an attack of any kind. In the Hawks narrative the embassy is presented as entirely peaceful. Also, the text of the letter which Millard Fillmore gave to Perry for delivery to the Emperor ...


3

This appears to have happened roughly around 1873, when Emperor Meiji decided to change his military structure to use a conscripted army. He was attempting to modernize Japan by following the examples he had seen from England and Germany. Most of the Samurai volunteered to become soldiers and many eventually became officers in the new modernized Japanese ...


2

(I think @congusbongus made some very good points concerning the lack of reasons against male-only succession, but I disagree with the motivations given in that answer. While plausible, "limiting heirs" and "concentrate power" seems to me like deductions borne of faulty premises regarding imperial power. Moreover, the Japanese were extremely concerned with ...



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