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19

I'm afraid I know nothing about which pre-Columbian cultures had any metalworking, but I can answer why metallurgy was, in 1492, very rare in the Americas but widespread in Eurasia. Paraphrasing liberally from Guns, Germs and Steel, which I happen to be reading at the moment, Native American peoples were largely hunter-gatherers. Metalworking, like any ...


11

Not all blades were constructed in the same way and of the same materials, but the Chinese are noted for originating binary swords. Ancient Chinese metallurgy recorded six different bronzes. In practice, the archeological record shows a much wider array of proportions, if only because much bronze was likely to have been recycled, but it seems clear that ...


10

Steel grating for platform use was first developed and produced by Walter Irving at the beginning of the 20th century. It was first used for ventilation of New York's stiflingly hot subway system, but his company, Irving Subway Grating, quickly marketed it for a range of other uses including bridge decking and catwalks. Aluminum grates (which might be ...


7

A smithy capable of producing horseshoes and simple iron weapons can be constructed in a matter of days. Nomad does not mean "moves every day", the non-raiding members of a group would have spent most of winter in one place, and everyone would have spent weeks at a time in single places. Nomadic blacksmiths are not paradoxical at all.


6

In the 1950s and 1960s titanium was a very exotic metal which few had the know how to make or use at the quantities and qualities required for a high tech military vehicle. Titanium is a notoriously difficult metal to work with. You can't refine it like steel, instead you titanium carbide. It burns when exposed to oxygen or nitrogen at high temperature, ...


6

Please clarify what you mean by dependence on USSR/Russian titanium. Do you mean: Titanium minerals which then need to be processed into metal and then into engineered items, Titanium metal which needs to be processed into engineering items, such as titanium sponge metal, or, Engineered items made of titanium such as aircraft ribs or landing gear? If you ...


4

(A good part of this answer is speculation.) There were areas of the current U.S. with moderately stable, non-nomadic farming communities before Columbus. However, there were few, if any, large cities, the tribal governments were not very well organized, and the labor and economic systems were very weak and disorganized compared to Europe, Asia, and Africa. ...


3

when and how did the West lose its dependency on the USSR for Titanium? In reality the West still seriously depends for Titanium on Russia. The main reason is pure economics. Titanium has a very high cost price, so Boeing may take a bit, but you may be sure that GM would never want it (unless a cheap technological process of making Titanium is ...


3

TL;DR: We don't know, but at least ~170 swords bearing - in whole or in part - some variation of "VLFBERHT" are known to exist. Number of Extant VLFBERHT swords: I came across the closest available approximation to an answer we're likely to get: The finds The number of extant sword blades with the signature Vlfberht is not known... Probably the ...


3

The wonderful thing about gold is that it is completely indestructible and imperishable. The gold we see today is the same gold that existed bilions of years ago. The same goes for silver. Even though gold has a boiling point, the vapor created is still gold. A count of gold in possession by humans would be impossible. There have been large ships of ...


2

I would say it has something to do with the sharpness gained with the high-tin content, according to several sources higher tin content seems to correlate with sharpness. After that it comes down to a fighting style, the Chinese refined the art of fighting (martial arts have been evidenced in China as far back as the 5th century BC while the earliest ...


2

I'm not sure about magic/ritual uses, and I'm not sure anyone could answer the 'why' someone tried something (until, at least, the scientific method) but there is evidence for seemingly random - but evidently useful - ingredients in metal work. For example, cupellation, a technique for refining silver used in Roman period through to the 17th Century CE ...


2

Anatolia is often credited with being the birthplace of ironworking. Ironworking precedes the Hittites, dating back to at least the third millennium BC in Anatolia, but the Hittites made important advances in metallurgy. Unfortunately, we know very little about the origins of metal working. Archaeological finds are very rare: because metal was so valuable, ...


2

Looks like rutile became available in the seventies in decent quantities from Australia. But this seems a low-grade ore. Norway started a major mine in 1960, which is still producing today. It probably didn't start at full production capacity. But even earlier, in 1950 the Lac Tio mines in Canada opened. You'd almost think the Americans imported the ...


1

Genghis Khan's general Subutai was said to be the son of a blacksmith, so they apparently did have their own smiths. Pastoralists with good access to horses and carts would have been quite capable of bringing along fairly heavy objects if they felt the need for doing so.


1

First of all, a huge reason why my people were conquered is that we had no immunity to the diseases they carried. The people of Anahuac had huge deposits of metals. Working silver, gold, tin, bronze and iron, there were many sights catering to these true works. The Incas were known to arm their soldiers with bronze axes and iron knives to the tens of ...



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