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In the 1950s and 1960s titanium was a very exotic metal which few had the know how to make or use at the quantities and qualities required for a high tech military vehicle. Titanium is a notoriously difficult metal to work with. You can't refine it like steel, instead you titanium carbide. It burns when exposed to oxygen or nitrogen at high temperature, ...


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The various claims you will read that the United States "depends" on Russia (or more properly the Ukraine) for titanium is pure nonsense, almost hysteria. The rutile ores of titanium in the Ukraine are good quality and because labor is relatively cheap there it is possible to get this good quality ore relatively cheaply. Basically we saved a few pennies by ...


2

Looks like rutile became available in the seventies in decent quantities from Australia. But this seems a low-grade ore. Norway started a major mine in 1960, which is still producing today. It probably didn't start at full production capacity. But even earlier, in 1950 the Lac Tio mines in Canada opened. You'd almost think the Americans imported the ...


6

Please clarify what you mean by dependence on USSR/Russian titanium. Do you mean: Titanium minerals which then need to be processed into metal and then into engineered items, Titanium metal which needs to be processed into engineering items, such as titanium sponge metal, or, Engineered items made of titanium such as aircraft ribs or landing gear? If you ...


3

when and how did the West lose its dependency on the USSR for Titanium? In reality the West still seriously depends for Titanium on Russia. The main reason is pure economics. Titanium has a very high cost price, so Boeing may take a bit, but you may be sure that GM would never want it (unless a cheap technological process of making Titanium is ...



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