Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

It's unclear if you mean whether it was (1) a ruse by Wilson against the American public, or (2) Germany against the USA, or (3) Germany against Mexico, or (4) British against USA? As far as being a ruse by Wilson (e.g. he made up the telegram to present to Congress), this can likely be discounted since there is documentary evidence - in 2005, an ...


9

On the topic of the Aztecs, an intriguing book on this subject is Aztec Warfare: Imperial Expansion and Political Control, by Ross Hassig. The Aztecs were an extremely war-like civilization, that were constantly attacking and subjugating their neighbors. Interestingly, though, their style of warfare was quite different from what we are familiar with from ...


6

Germany sent, or tried to send the "Zimmerman telegram" to a Mexican government that basically didn't exist. The reason was that Mexico was in throes of a "free for all" civil war at the time, which is to say that it was in a state of anarchy. The reason the Germans thought otherwise was because the most unruly of the four major factions, the one under ...


6

If you are talking about the Omelc/Aztec/Maya, at war with the Cree or Inuits, I very much doubt this ever happened, as, 1) They had no quarrel, and so, no reason to go to war. 2) They had no way of marching across the USA, according to my Google Earth measurements, the distance from New York/New Jersey to Honduras, is 4,000 km. An average human can walk 5 ...


5

The ship was the SS Ypiranga, which was indeed a German ship (although it was at that point a cargo-steamer, not yet a passenger liner). Díaz departed from the port of Veracruz on May 31st, 1911 bound for the French port of Le Havre with a stop Havana. The event was reported in the June 1st edition of the New York Times: VERA CRUZ, May 31. -- ...


5

Did any relevant Mexican authority ever acknowledge the secession of Texas before the start of the Mexican-American War? No. Small clashes arose between the two countries for several years afterward. The war between Texas and Mexico did not truly come to an end until the Mexican-American War of 1846. A theory that paints the Mexican-American War as a ...


4

I'm hardly a Mexican legal expert. However, the Constitutional article you state (the first can be ignored, as that Constitution isn't in effect any more) seems to say that your right to keep guns in your own home can only be restricted by Federal authorities (not state or local authorities). However, there's no limit placed on how restrictive the Federal ...


3

There are several antecedents you may want to take in consideration to approach an aswer for this question here: Queretero as such was re-founded on 1537 by the local Otomi leader "Conin" who was baptised by the spanish church and named afterwards "Fernando de Tapia". Using his friendship with the spanish caciques, he managed to secure the location for the ...


3

For contact between the inhabitants of present-day United States and present-day Mexico, you can also see the Wikipedia article on Chichimeca, the commonly used name for the peoples that lived to the north of the Aztecs. It appears not much is known about them. The map posted in another answer is beautiful and very informative, but we should remember that ...


2

In an article on the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, PBS offers the following estimate: At the time of the treaty, approximately 80,000 Mexicans lived in the ceded territory, which comprised only about 4 percent of Mexico’s population. PBS


2

The US has a long history of strained border relations with Mexico, especially early in Mexico's history. New Spain, which later became Mexico, was often a place where slaves would flee their masters. Texas declared independence from Mexico in 1821 and a war was fought. Mexico abolished slavery in 1829 causing more slaves in the US to flee there and ...


1

You referenced the Anasazi (better named 'Ancient Pueblo'). I've visited a number of their sites (lost a Ford at Mesa Verde!) and have studied them quite a bit off and on. The Ancient Pueblo people follow a trend that seems to be common with ancient civilizations: Find an area that is rich enough for agriculture of some form. Develop farming. Build ...


1

A possible explanation is that he simply received the name of the saint on whose day he was baptized. That would be 11 April in this case. Wikipedia says he traveled to the mission on September 24 and was baptized "soon". Can "soon" refer to a six-month period? I don't know. Or maybe the fathers at the mission just had a soft spot for St. Stanislaw for ...


1

Many capital cities are located at a confluence of available water, moderate climate, and transportation intersections. This would describe Paris, London, Rome, and Mexico City. Many capitals in the US, including many state capitals, are 'in the middle' of two powerful interest groups. The US capital is situated on the boundary between what were Slave and ...


1

Firstly, the Zimmerman telegram was real and sent, he admitted so himself at a press conference. Secondly, it was a feint to turn Americas attention away from the war in Europe and towards a possible one against Mexico. Germany feared Americas involvement in the war and wanted to ensure they were more concerned with one closer to home. There was no serious ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible