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Using the above comment's source, and assuming a thatcher circa 1340 would earn 3 pence daily for 365 days a year, I believe that calculates to approx. 71 British pounds or 103 USD today. Please correct me if I'm wrong.


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In England the the Parliamentarians' New Model Army of 1645 was arguably the first state army, not controlled by the monarch or nobility. It comprised mainly professional full-time soldiers rather than a casual militia.


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Nobles were required to provide troops and arms, and be skilled in their command and supply - this was far more important than their combat abilities, and why noblemen had so much power, wealth and prestige. What happened was the emergence of the modern standing army in the fifteenth century, notably the Ottoman Janissaries and the unorthodox army led by ...


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Lifting from this site, I found a "cheap sword (peasant's)", England ~1340, listed at 6 pence. The same site lists the daily wage of a thatcher (in the same time period) as 3 pence. The source is given as "Standards of Living in the Later Middle Ages, Christopher Dyer, Cambridge University Press, 1989". Probably a good source to look into. This does not ...


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TL;DR: We don't know, but at least ~170 swords bearing - in whole or in part - some variation of "VLFBERHT" are known to exist. Number of Extant VLFBERHT swords: I came across the closest available approximation to an answer we're likely to get: The finds The number of extant sword blades with the signature Vlfberht is not known... Probably the ...


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There is less spectacular evidence of Viking activity in the north which includes bits of iron, both meteoritic iron from Greenland and smelted iron from Iceland and Norway, bits of smelted copper and a few bits of sawn oak which were found in old aboriginal sites in the north including metal into the central high arctic. What is not known is exactly how ...


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The USA modelled it's education system on Germany's (started with Kindergarten of course) and then ending with your "Gymnasium" or PhD. The first Universities were in Upstate New York (Cornell, Colgate) and were "land grant Universities" dedicated to the study of Agriculture. This they did very well...


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University: from Latin universitas magistrorum et scholarium ("community of teachers and scholars)" The university (as we know it today) was not created ex nihilo but rather grew out of something else, which was the pursuit of learning in urban centers among those who could afford it. European higher education as far back as the 6th century was often ...


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During medieval times, the only thing close to what we would call education was carried out by the church. Usually by monks and nuns, studying religious texts and similar items. Some of these schools tended to be much better at this than others, and essentially this gave the opportunity to those more gifted in academia to study further and it became more ...


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1\3 of the world's gold come from Hungarian gold mines in the medieval area before America discovered. About 13.000.000 kg were mined from ancient times to 1492. About 500.000 kg mined in Hungary from 1300 tó 1500. From Körmöcbánya 1000 kg\year.


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At the time both England and France recognized the authority of the Church. Were there any attempt at having the Pope invited to adjudicate the succession amiably? At the time, England and France recognized the religious authority of the Church. At the time, the popes claimed to be the rightful secular rulers of all the world. But most medieval kings ...


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In 1298 Emperor Andronicus II, defeated by Serbian King Stefan Milutin, promished him an imperial bride. He intended his sister, Eudokia, empress dowger of Trebizond, but she refused and Andronicus then selected his daughter Simonis or Simonida, who was born about 1294. The 50 year old Milutin divorced his third wife, Anna Terter, sister of the Bulgarian ...


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Christianity in particular arose out of the Roman period when most people were trying to figure out the nature of the universe in lieu of any scientific evidence. When Christianity was coming into being there were innumerable religious sects throughout the Roman world, all competing with each other. By chance Christianity was the sect that grew, but the ...


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Frederick II was not a monster. One must consider when he lived, for one. They had NO idea that keeping children in that way would mess them up psychologically, as it surely would, if they even lived, which they didn't, and they didn't know it would kill them, either. Prisoners were deemed at the time to have given their lives to the State. ANYTHING could ...


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well, i think it's fairly random. When you say knight, i presume you are referring to a medieval longsword. It depends on many factors such as make, luck and ultimately what the sword is used for/against. If it was a civilian weapon used for duels and self-defense, it would probably last more than a battle weapon used against polearms, axes, maces and ...


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We will never know for sure because when they burned heretics they also burnt all things with their image on them.


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I'd have to agree with the Mike L. As long as the sword or blade is of at least decent quality steel and make, and cared for properly ( cleaned free of blood, perediocally sharpened, and kept free of rust) and you use it as intened (killing things, not chopping down trees or digging up stones or anything like that) Then the sword will last pretty much ...


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The Pseudo-Isidore is a case in point. Peter Heather has a very interesting account of it, in one of his books.


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Very few lords decreed that their lands were now kingdoms, because most lordships in Europe were part of kingdoms. There were very few counties, duchies, or lordships in Europe that were not already parts of kingdoms. Even though the overlordship of the king in question might have been very vague, weak, or theoretical, it was legal and customary. So if a ...


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Forgery was common in medieval time, beginning with the most famous one: the Donation of Constantine. Very common objects of forgery were holy relics which were traded in great quantities. Europe was full of the itinerant merchant selling these relics.


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This article notes that most of the Portuguese nobility actually sided with King Juan I of Castile. (Juan had married the daughter of King Fernao of Portugal; when Fernao died without a son, Juan claimed the throne of Portugal on the basis of his marriage to Fernao's daughter.) So it seems likely that King Joao of Portugal -- whose base of support was ...



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