Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

@Semaphore I agree with most of what you say, except one thing: unless they do so surreptitiously you can move defenders quicker across the "diameter" than the attackers can around the "circumference". It's what they mean by having interior lines. As to OP's idea of cattle, a general rule of food chains is that each step is only 10% efficient. Land that ...


2

The answer depends on dozens of different factors. If you did a quick review of wikipedia and google before asking the question, you could have answered most of your questions, identified the factors and been able to ask a far better question. Most of the time taxes were paid in kind (chickens, grain, etc.) Other taxes were paid in labor - time spent ...


0

They did not enclose corn fields and cattle pastures inside the walls of a castle. Such walls would be too long and need too many people to defend. Most of the food during a siege came from supplies. But supplies (of grain and other products like this) can be stored for very long time (for years). Many castles had wells. Some could have vegetable gardens. ...


14

Obviously this depends on how many defenders there were inside the castle. A castle garrisoned by a single person could probably live reasonably well off the chickens that might be in the bailey, for instance. He could even start a vegetable garden or some such. Realistically, no castle could hope to produce enough food to sustain a reasonably-sized ...


5

Simple answer, no. As you increase the size of your fortified enclosure to contain more land for cultivation, you obviously increase the length of the walls. The longer the walls are, the more people you require to defend them successfully. At the same time, those people actively defending the walls (in a siege) cannot be working the fields and tending the ...


2

The number of Jews who lent money in the Middle Ages is unfortunately commonly over-estimated. The majority of Jews had jobs that did not involve money-lending. This is a fairly new historical discovery, though more and more research is coming out every year. For a good, scholarly, and responsible introduction see: Margolis, Ethan Levi, "Evidence that the ...


2

Maybe you are confusing situations: Currently, the idea of "Reconquista" is just held to talk about the chronological and geographical frame, but the idea of a "managed" process to take all of the Iberian Peninsula back from the Muslim rulers is generally discredited as a "post-facto" fabrication (giving a "national idea" of "proto-Spain" to the several ...


3

It depends who is talking. As @Alex pointed in his comment Serious historians do not use the words "good", "bad", "evil" etc. These notions depend on time and culture. So when talking about different time and different culture, a scientist should avoid them. What is important, the process of taking back Spain (and Portugal) is called not a "crusade", ...


6

You have somewhat answered your own question. The Reeve and Bailiff were essentially the same job in Medieval England. The Reeve was a person that oversaw the land and crops and was in charge of the peasants. A reeve was basically an estate manager. A reeve is actually described in Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, describing the reeve as a highly ...


0

In 15th century Europe the standard pen was the quill pen. There is a very famous book "Il Libro dell' Arte" by Cennino d'Andrea Cennini. It describes writing and painting technology in the 15th century completely. You can buy it on Amazon. Quill pens were cut from the feather of a bird like a goose using a knife. The tip of the pen is dipped in ink. It ...


2

See Textes pour les cahiers du sud (1987) and Ecritures cathares (1968) by Rene Nelli. The most famous tract is the The Provencal Ritual of the Albigeois published in facsimile by Jean Cledat:


1

Its not France, but I imagine the situation would be similar to England. In the middle ages English families had a size of 5 on average, until the black death reduced it to 4 on average. Source



Top 50 recent answers are included