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7

Using the Wikipedia article as source, lances were indeed once-use items for shock attacks. If they hadn't splintered then they were sure to have gotten stuck, so they were intended to be dropped. This is with the heavy lances most people seem to have in mind, when they think of a charge by heavily armoured knights. However, anecdotal, I'm friends with ...


0

Having read all these comments, I am impressed with the amount of knowledge shared on this forum. Very informative, I am also a writer of Sci-fantasy and I found this to be an excellent well of information. But I do have to pose the question that as we talk about materials and their abundance I wonder if as a person dials back the gauge of time, how common ...


2

So I'm wondering: did people perhaps believe in the divine right of kings partly because anyone who wasn't particularly adept at managing the different wants and desires of his subjects tended to get killed a lot. So the lineage of kings that survived would likely have something in the genes and/or upbringing allowing them to continue on and procreate before ...


5

I think the "Divine Right of Kings" you mention is probably tangled with modern Protestant, democratic and enlightenment notions about God being a mostly private endeavor and kings being an aberration. Chapter 10 of G.K. Chesteron's "Short History of England" touches on exactly what you want to know*. He wrote that the supporters of the divine right of ...


0

European monarchs had to justify their reign. Religion plaid a major role in that context throughout the history of mankind: Having divine approval a monarch had the right to reign, to suppress, to order, to take and to give. Seeking the connection to god(s) political leaders tried to be seen as something divine: People don't question the power of god(s), ...


2

Not as precise answer as I'd like, but it might lead you to the correct answer with further research. Googling for "hungarian heraldry crescent 13th century" yields at least one crescent, from the Sas coat of arms, which indeed has a crescent in it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sas_coat_of_arms Sas or Szász (origin: Slavic for "Saxon", Polish: Sas, ...


0

In medieval Europe it took a standard blacksmith about a week to make a decent average steel longsword. If they where making something for their lord or king they would often spend as much as 6 months ensuring they had the ornate design perfect, but that's about it. Usually a sword would take about 1-2 months to finish, not because they where spending that ...


-3

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0

In another thread: How were the territories added to (and thus the limits set in) the Holy Roman Empire I have a post discussing not where were the borders of the Holy Roman Empire, but IF there were borders of the Holy Roman Empire. Historians of Southeast Asia have the concept of a "mandala" realm, where the authority of the sovereign gets less and less ...



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