Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

There are a few reasons for why this happened so early in England. Following the Black Death, there was an increase in surplus labor which could demand more rights and better treatment for their work, including better payment making them soon less dependent on their lords. The Black Death also decreased the people's faith in the Catholic Church. The ...


4

Serfs in England were known as "villeins". By the mid-16th century villeinage had more or less died out because the courts generally refused to enforce the right of return on various grounds starting around 1500. These legal changes occurred gradually. The last significant notice of villeinage was a formal commission by the crown of Queen Elizabeth in 1574 ...


0

One must come to the realization that being armored and at the same time swinging a heavy metal or bronze sword all the while slamming into other men hacking,stabbing ect.would be tiring even for a badass of his day and one more thing to truly grasp the realness ever try to neatly slash or stab U'r way into a thick leather coat much less chainmail or hard ...


1

I don't think there was any tribal organisation as such. Starting with Wanyan Wugunai circa mid-11th century, the Wanyan Tribe became dominant among the Jurchens. Successive Wanyan chieftains gradually unified the Jurchen tribes as hereditary jiédùshǐ of the Liao Empire, and also took the Jurchen title of begile. By 1115, the new begile Wanyen Akuta (Wanyan ...


11

This is really more like a whole list of questions... 1. Why was de Grailly granted this title, which was apparently used by only a few families, and not some other title? I think there's a bit of confusion here. The prefix of Captal was the traditional title for the lords of Buch. Edward III granted Jean III de Grailly the fief of Buch which came with it ...


4

I think the problem lies in the "should" of your question - by what criteria? And Richard III actually usurped the throne from his nephews - the "Princes in the Tower" - whether he had them murdered or not, so can hardly be "the last line legitimate" monarch, as you state. IF you believe in a divinely-ordained right of succession, whereby the Crown passes ...


2

I want to expand a point raised in @Semaphore's excellent answer. Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People not only mentions Rome - it gives a detailed (if garbled at times) account of Roman history, from the British perspective. Here's the beginning of the list of contents of Book I: (source) BOOK I I. Of the situation of Britain and ...


2

Discovering the opinions of uneducated, non-writing, people in times before opinion polls is inherently difficult, regardless of the topic. The best approach I can see to this question is to look at what the Church was teaching, and assume it was generally believed. For this purpose the cult of St. Alban is interesting. According to the website of the ...


1

This is not a proper answer, but more of an extended comment on other answers. I note the answers and possibly the question tend to not clearly distinguish England from Britain. [This is a common problem with sources in English.] 'Middle ages' is a broad period, so specifically calling out 800AD is helpful. At that time, Britain was populated by Scots, ...


2

The Catholic Church had a presence in Britain from 3rd Century (see St Alban who was a Roman soldier and martyr after whom the city of St Albans was named). The Church continued and grew through the centuries until now, but in medieval times the community life of the country was extremely orientated around the Church's liturgical characters. This link with ...


3

It would be quite difficult to not to know about Roman Empire in medieval Europe just because the events described in New Testament and other religious literature happened in Roman Empire. This includes for instance, the execution of Jesus as well as deeds and life of various saints. The proper question would be how did the medieval population imagine Roman ...


5

To answer the question about Hadrian's Wall directly, Gildas mentions the conquest and loss of Britain to the Romans, including the construction of the wall, in De Excidio et Conquestu Britanniae ("On the Ruin and Conquest of Britain"). I am not sure exactly when it was written, but Gildas dies in roughly 570. Gildas was British and spent a great deal of ...


16

The short answer: they were very aware of the Roman empire and its past glory. Long answer: This questions gets to the problem of "What was England Like in the 9th Century?" If you can answer this question well, you can get an idea of whether the average person would known of Rome, or how much they would have known. I would suggest as a starter looking at ...


4

According to History World, the Brits interacted enough with the Holy Roman Empire on the continent to participate in their preservation of classic scrolls. Charlemagne certainly knew of the then-current Byzantine Empire, the Moorish kingdoms, and the history of Rome. The word surely reached the occasional educated British ear. This source does not refer to ...


1

I remember being told that the development of glass making was one of the key technological breakthroughs that enabled the Enlightenment in Europe. Originally used for making vessels and windows, it allowed optics such as telescopes, magnifiers, microscopes, etc to be made. Once these had been invented sciences such as astronomy, chemistry and biology could ...


12

The early medieval Welsh had several folktales and legends which survive in versions written down in the 12th century, but which refer to the Romans. The best known example is probably the Dream Of Emperor Macsen, whose title character is derived from Magnus Maximum, commander of the Roman army in Britain in the late 4th century.


20

Educated people in the European Middle Ages knew Latin and read the Roman classics. They were thus very well informed about the Roman Empire. Even uneducated people were keenly aware of the contents of the Bible (through sermons, passion plays, for example). The Roman Empire figures very prominently in the New Testament narrative (Caesar Augustus, Pontius ...


33

Many writings from this time period mention Roman Britain. Notable examples include the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and the Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum, both of which mention Rome. These date to around the 9-12th centuries and the 8th century, respectively. There are also pseudohistorical works that speak of Rome, such as the fantastical 9th-century ...


5

Ony theory I have read is (I believe Jared Diamond) that Europes diversity and fragmented nature spurred innovation, while the united China was much more controllable. To explain that: China produced more Iron, better ships etc. in the time of the early European (1600+) conquests, but when the empires bureaucracy feared the growing power of the merchants it ...


1

First, you can put aside the "Well the Europeans were just cleverer", as even a cursory glance at world history will show inventions and developments from all societies at one time or another, from the Incan to the Chinese. What I think could likely be the main trouble the Chinese had with technology is that the scale of the Chinese nation was so large. In ...


0

This is kind of an off-topic question because any answer will be a matter of opinion, but I guess I will take a stab at it. First of all, Indian mathematics was very advanced in some regards and we ended up borrowing elements of it (via the Arabs), such as the use of "Arabic" numerals, which are actually of Indian origin. Indian computation of planetary ...


0

Very broad question and it also ignores the fact that feudal and cast-based societies were redistribute wealth different way than present democratic societies. However let me give an angle that may be useful (no data, sorry): The huge economic difference between India and the UK is coming from the significantly earlier industrialization of the UK. However ...


0

When people are not happy, they revolt against the rulers, the french revolution followed a famine. So, if you research the number of revolutions and popular uprisings through the centuries, and list them, you may have an indication of living standards by area. It has to be one of the simplest ways to answer your question. it's a direct measurement of ...


1

GDP per capita is an indicator of living standards. A solid comparison of share of GDP can be found in this link Since 01AD until today the world's changed quite a lot. But until 1700AD the balance of wealth hadn't. For the past two centuries the share of the world's GDP has shifted to the west to Europe through imperialism, and technological ...


6

In Carolingian times, the yield of grain on average soil was 2:1. For each seed planted, you harvested two. Starting with the eleventh century, an upward trend brought agricultural productivity to an average of 4:1. This meant 8-12 bushels (200-300 kg) of grain per acre. Let's just conclude that in Carolingian times, in Western Europe, an acre of land gave ...


4

It highly depends on what you grew on it, where, and how many tools you had at your disposal. Generally vegetables had higher yields, but were harder to harvest. So the reason why grain became a staple food is that there was just enough place for it to be grown. Legumes were also a staple food; they provided more calories per hectare besides baring much ...



Top 50 recent answers are included