Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Without seeing a photograph I cannot say for sure, but by far the most likely possibility is that what you are seeing are the remains of what was once a sheeted masonry wall. In some cases masonry walls were covered with lead or copper sheets as a form of protection. In these cases a groove, called a "raglet", was made in the stone and the sheet of lead ...


3

In many cases, during early stone structures throughout the European region, there would be "I" (Capital) shaped groves used to connect stones together (half the "i" shaped grove in each side-by-side block) particularly during difficult portions of construction. In many cases these would be filled with molten lead and this lead link would help secure the ...


2

Many medieval buildings had (and still have) roofs made of lead sheets. This was a very reasonable material for roofs, not vulnerable to corrosion. One disadvantage is that it is very heavy. Also this was a common material for all sorts of pipes and gutters and other metal details. Even in modern times (I mean 50 years ago) lead was commonly used for ...


7

Baptism is one time only in a life in the Roman Catholic Church. So this fiction has a major research fail: an Anglo-Saxon (AS) Christian will be Roman Catholic Church, not Protestant anabaptist religion, and cannot be re-baptised. At confirmation, in modern usage he may add a favorite saint's name to his own and take up using it, but that's modern. Camden ...


2

This question is very vague, but I assume you are asking about the Middle Ages in Western Europe, though there is no reason why it should not be about Byzantium, Islam, India, China or any other mediaeval civilisation. But let us stick to Western Europe. In Western Christendom (and also in Byzantium) the universal system of time-keeping was the Julian ...


3

(from comment i turned it to answer) Nomadic people could use most of their male population as soldier, and they were full time on horse and using bows regularly. Also bows are good weapon for their tactics that works for battles on open field. Settled people however were mostly busy with agriculture, majority of their foot-soldiers are untrained peasants ...


3

Tribal nomadic societies can sustain a greater percentage (around 20% which is basically all military age males) of the population as warriors. Once you have sedentary agricultiral population, money based economy and specialisation the number if full time soldiers supported becomes a much smaller number (maybe 1%). Once you have cities (or other centres) ...


9

For the most part, church and celestial events. In particular, midsummer and midwinter and the equinoxes were both easy to detect and were important events, at least in the colder climates of Europe. One problem with this approach was that the Julian calendar, which was used pretty much everywhere during the middle ages, by the 1500s had gotten seriously ...


-1

The villagers lived with a set of rights and obligations to their feudal overlords and the church. A dozen geese on Martini, three days of labor maintaining roads in the spring, regular church services, ... They'd have to track that, even if they didn't use the names of months and numbered days in the month.


9

The Mongolians originally lived as a tribal culture, and all of their sons would from birth be trained on the horse, bow, and other weapons. As the Khans turned them into a war machine they would continue the training all young mongols received by incorporating tactics, and cavalry formations. "There was no such thing as a civilian population in Mongolia. ...


0

Bows are suitable weapons for mounted warriors because it is difficult to close with a mounted opponent. For a foot soldier a blade is needed, because it is not so easy to run away. The difficulty with maintaining a professional army is the cost, which in the case of archers is more expensive because training is problematic. Also, you must pay for both ...


1

These devices are calls Mons in Japanese languages and they are essential elements of Japanese heraldry. Mons are Japanese arms used to decorate and identify an individual or family. Since a Mon is hereditary, it is equal with a arms in concept but not in principles. Personally, I think Japanese heraldry has some similarities to Polish heraldry, because of a ...


1

In early medieval England most people had a single name. It was not common to rename children unless the child was adopted or changed families. However, many people would change their names if their circumstances changed or they moved. Also, people would adopt names to disguise their identity especially if they were engaged in warfare or banditry. Sometimes ...



Top 50 recent answers are included