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The Pseudo-Isidore is a case in point. Peter Heather has a very interesting account of it, in one of his books.


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Very few lords decreed that their lands were now kingdoms, because most lordships in Europe were part of kingdoms. There were very few counties, duchies, or lordships in Europe that were not already parts of kingdoms. Even though the overlordship of the king in question might have been very vague, weak, or theoretical, it was legal and customary. So if a ...


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I think this discussion is a bit inaccurate. Not sur if you'd count that as a forgery, but someone wealthy enough could make himself pass as a noble by behaving and dressing like one. – MakorDal Apr 26 at 9:21 @MakorDal: That's a bit dodgy - you wold have to bribe a School of Heraldry in order to obtain a sigil, and even then there was no great ...


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This is kind of a vague question, but in general, kings were revered figures throughout history on average. Of course, it is popular now to criticize kings, accentuate their faults and scandals, and deprecate them as tyrants and monsters. But, in real actuality at the time kings were revered figures in their homelands for the most part. Many peasants ...


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Forgery was common in medieval time, beginning with the most famous one: the Donation of Constantine. Very common objects of forgery were holy relics which were traded in great quantities. Europe was full of the itinerant merchant selling these relics.


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This article notes that most of the Portuguese nobility actually sided with King Juan I of Castile. (Juan had married the daughter of King Fernao of Portugal; when Fernao died without a son, Juan claimed the throne of Portugal on the basis of his marriage to Fernao's daughter.) So it seems likely that King Joao of Portugal -- whose base of support was ...


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In my answer to What was the price of a horse in 1750? I provided some actual prices for horses and oxen from early Detroit, dated 1807 and 1825. If you look at the values given you find that a team of horses is worth double a team of oxen. If you look at the inventories you will also find the price of land: 40 acres is worth about the value of a team of ...


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The people who invented this proverb had somewhat different lifestyle from yours. And lived in different environment. They worked the land. For them a horse was not a liability but an asset. And these people were the majority of population. So even if one of them had no grass to feed a horse, or no desire to work with it, s/he would easily sell it. Even if ...


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Between the start of the middle ages, until the Industrial revolution (Which majorly changed the revenue a horse could reek), what was on average the burden of owning an horse (Cost vs Income)? The answer to both sides, cost and income, is "it depends". Do you have a lot of land for the horse to graze on? Do you already own other horses and thus ...


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A horse's teeth is one way to determine its age. So you should look at the teeth if you're buying it. If it's a gift, free, then there's no point in looking. You won't lose anything if it's old, and the giver might get offended and retract his offer.



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