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1

According to Winston Churchill, "A History of the English Speaking People," pp90-91: "For ten years, [the Duke of\ Marlborough led the armies of the Grand Alliance, [England, the Netherlands, several German states[ and during all that period he never fought a battle he did not win or besieged a town he did not take. Nothing like this exists in the annals of ...


-1

Since you mention he was in India, perhaps he could have been in part of the Hazara expedition of 1888-02.


20

Several other examples would be: Thutmose III (1481-1426 BC) Arguably one of the greatest Pharaohs. Changed a kingdom into an empire. Alexander the Great (356-323 BC): Brought, amongst others, Persia to its knees Ashoka the Great (304-232 BC): The Maurian King who spread buddism to the Indian subcontinent Scipio Africanus the Elder (236-183 BC) One of the ...


3

Speaking as a New Zealander, the Gallipoli campaign in WW1 is a pretty good example. A complete unmitigated disaster (and not much happier on the Turkish side), but we commemorate it (as do the Australians) because the occasion played a major part in the development of a national identify separate from Britain.


6

The battle of Thermopylae (300 Spartans) is a prime example:-) I think no comments are required because everyone knows this example very well. Persian literature of that time did not survive to our days, but one can be reasonably sure that Persians did not consider this battle as something very important. Moreover, one can conjecture that the battle is so ...


2

Lost battles are most often commemorated when they preceded, or led to, a win. For instance, Bunker Hill was a technically lost battle that led to the successful siege of Boston. The loss of the Alamo, in Texas, preceded the Texas victory at San Jacinto. The ancient Greek equivalent of the Alamo, Thermopylae, was followed by a victory at Salamis. Pearl ...


1

Great responses as usual. The Battle of Kosovo is a major example of the "genre." The overriding theme in "by winning you lose" usually comes down to the idea of a Pyrhric Victory where the enemy achieves a tactical success but at such a cost it becomes a strategic defeat (Bunker Hill in US military lore.) For entire Campaigns certainly Napoleon's against ...


3

One case I haven't seen covered by existing answers is when the commemorator lost the battle but won the war, to so speak. The Battle of Borodino was a disaster for the Russians, who lost a third of their army, as well as one of the most high-profile generals. After the battle, the Russian army retreated in disarray and Napoleon captured Moscow. And yet ...


4

The Battle of Grunwald (taking place near Grunwald/Tannenberg) was a battle fought in 1410 between Polish-Lithuanian army on one side, and Teutonic Knights on the other. The battle resulted in a decisive Polish-Lithuanian victory. In 1914, as a part of WW1, the Battle of Tannenberg was actually fought near Allenstein between Germany and Russia, resulting in ...


39

The battle caused mass casualties. The commemoration is part of the mourning. Example: Stalingrad from the German viewpoint. The battle showed outstanding heroism from the defeated side. The commemoration celebrates the heroes. Example: Camerone from the Foreign Legion viewpoint. The battle was perceived as perfidy from the winning side. The defeated side is ...


10

Per your comment "I am interested in ... the conditions under which the loser comes to actively keep memories of the battle alive." Conditions for retaining a memorial of the defeat include the symbolism associated with the battle the larger cultural reasons/struggles behind the battle celebration of martyrs the sense of group identity it ...


35

Battle of the Alamo is certainly remembered in Texas, and they certainly lost that battle. Pearl Harbor was a major loss to the United States, and is still commemorated annually. In these two cases the prior losses became rallying cries in future battles, which were victories. The Romans lost the Battle of the Caudine Forks, 321 BC, for which the ...


7

My impression is that the siege of Sevastopol (1854) is more remembered by the side that lost (Russians). Some of the great Russian literature is written about it, and it is very much reflected in Russian art. Museum commemorating this siege is the main sightseeing in Sevastopol. It is true this siege is remembered by the British and French as well (one of ...


1

It's certainly true that the Soviet Union cultivated friendly relations with India from the accession of Khrushchev onward (Stalin seems to have viewed India as basically an agent of the West, despite its independence), including significant amounts of foreign aid. Khrushchev visited India in 1955, following a visit to the Soviet Union by Nehru earlier that ...


3

Two of India's enemies, China and Pakistan were allied, beginning with the Chinese invasion of the Kashmir in 1962. Later, beginning in the 1970s, the U.S. "tilted" toward China. A Soviet Union-Indian "rapprochement" was the natural counterweight. "The enemy of my enemy is my friend."


2

If I remember correctly, Nehru had several communist sympathies -- or at least, was very tied into and involved with the Soviet Union. Also the U.S. had, in the post-Nixon era, greater ties with China, and hence the Soviets were open to trade with India. Of course, politically, India were quite foundational in the Non Aligned Movement, which spared it from ...


0

Having read all these comments, I am impressed with the amount of knowledge shared on this forum. Very informative, I am also a writer of Sci-fantasy and I found this to be an excellent well of information. But I do have to pose the question that as we talk about materials and their abundance I wonder if as a person dials back the gauge of time, how common ...


0

This remains even today a Battle very much shrouded in mystery...and it's not for lack of Historians digging into the archives. The only substantive reading on the Battle that I have read is that there were 3 Russian Commanders including Zhukov with one of the other two being executed. According to most historical accounts this was the first attempt by the ...


2

The other answers are fantastic, but one more one important point: The perception that the "the USSR was very weak". This perception could be the result of anti-Russian and anti-Soviet propaganda, and is not well grounded in a factual analysis. Stereotypes about Russian bureaucracy and culture are widely present in historical English language media. ...


1

In the Roman Empire soldiers were often used to work on various construction projects that had military and/or peacetime uses, such as Roman roads, for example. So the earliest examples, if there are any earlier ones, would have to be pre-Roman and thus dated BC and not AD.


1

It may be noted that although popular US history often describes Great Britain as the mightiest power in the world at the time, Britain was rather puny in the size and power of its army. The Chinese Empire and some other Asian powers had armies in the hundreds of thousands, and at least four European powers, France, Russia, Austria, and Prussia, also had ...


2

Hijaz Hijaz only a small part of Arabian Peninsula situated on Eastern bank of the Red sea. Arab groups understandably varied in their laws and customs throughout the region. Who was the Power in Hijaz In Hijaz, main power was the City state of Mecca. In fact, Meccans were the most prominent people among the Arabs due to being custodians of Kaaba. Meccan ...


1

I do not remember the source but I have read that in Roman Empire soldiers were sometimes used to harvest grapes.


0

As a child in 1950's Britain, my school taught that the American Revolution was a revolution of Englishmen in America to preserve their historic liberties and rights against the attempt by the German (Hanoverian) King Georges I-III to impose a European-style monarchy on Britain. The story was that many British soldiers and even officers refused to go to ...


2

Blaž Kraljević Only name that comes to mind is Blaž Kraljević. He was leader of Croatian Defence Forces (HOS), a paramilitary force serving under Bosnian Armed forces. He did better than arguing against extremism, he stood up against extremism. The only condition he presented to hard-pressed-on-all-sides Bosnians for his cooperation was that Bosnia will ...


1

One reason is that leaders didn't know about particular diseases in relatively remote areas or how to fight/treat them. In the examples you cited, European soldiers died of yellow fever in Haiti, and plague in Egypt. Those were tropical diseases that European commanders knew little about. In such cases, locals or "natives" had the advantage over them. By ...


1

Probably French line infantry of the period, in which case 113 is the regiment number. Attached a couple of illustrations of Franco-Prussian War period line uniforms.


3

I believe the double-breasted tunic (distinct from the greatcoat, for cold weather) is signature of the troupes de marins as shown here; and here . Epaulettes are worn only by officers, and the 135 on the collar is presumably a unit ID, perhaps a regimental number. That there is not an anchor on the collar may suggest that the picture was taken after July ...



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