New answers tagged

0

In the Tiger Fibel (which is the Tiger tank's manual) it was explicitly stated that you should ram things you could ram. Though things you could ram were not specified there.


2

Because the Roman infantry developed a "two wave" attack structure. The phalanxes used long spears, whose advantage was that they could kill enemies at "long range" (15-20 feet). So the Romans broke up their attack into two stages. The first part was with "pilum" (throwing spears), which were launched from 50-60 feet away, and had a greater range than ...


0

When the shovel became standard issue for infantry between World Wars 1 and 2. I don't believe swords were ever "standard issue" for infantry but certainly starting with Napoleon bayonets were. German infantry did so well against all other counterparts in North Africa because Erwin Rommel made sure all soldiers had a shovel, knew how to use it and in fact ...


6

In general no, though specific exceptions have existed, and continue to exist, in the Law of War code adopted by the U.S. Army. Through much of its history the U.S. Army has been regulated by the Instructions for the Government of Armies of the United States in the Field (Lieber Code). 24 April 1863.. The current U.S. Army Rules War still exhibit much of ...


1

About shooting a German soldier because he is wearing a US uniform coat. In the American Civil War many rebel soldiers acquired US uniform coats, jackets, etc. from dead or captured US soldiers, and dyed them gray or butternut if they had time. And lots of those rebels were later captured without many illegal executions of those wearing clothing of Union ...


0

Power spreads easily.they were powerfull in those days.they were boosted by their faith and high morale.there was also a rape case and the wealth of spain.so they struck iberia hard.


0

There is a very substantial collection of Indian war posters in the Imperial War Museum collection in London. Illiteracy doesn't mean no equation at all with the world of print, and illustration.


3

In recent years, states (countries? Nations?) have had a monopoly on the use of force and violence to maintain power. States only recently (1800's) became the prime segment of governance, and states didn't truly have a monopoly on the use of force until the post WWII order. Prior to this, nearly every segment of the population had the ability to use force ...


1

Cecil Rhodes, the founder of South Africa's DeBeers Diamond Company, and the British South Africa Company maintained an "army" of 600 cavalry under Dr. Leland Starr Jameson that helped bring about the Boer War.


5

It can be hard to draw the lines between a corporation (or similar entity) which is hired to use force on behalf of a nation state and a corporation that is allowed to use force by a nation state. Consider the Hanseatic League in medieval times. They raised forces and fought wars. Companies which ruled towns or towns ruled by their merchant class?


7

Speaking as a former military aviation-type person myself, I can assure you that the U.S. Navy (and uncle sam's airplane army, which was one of the unofficial names of the branch I first served in, the USAF) had and have, STACKS of regulations governing when and where to land if your home carrier is unavailable. I cannot speak of direct or familial ...


1

There were airfields being built starting with Gudalcanal of course. As the War progressed many more Airfields would be created...some of which are even airports today. If you Google search "Navy Seabees" you'll understand an amazing expertise that US servicemen gained by fighting the "island hopping campaign"...one that had a major impact back here in the ...


8

From the Military History Journal (Volume 4 No 1 - June 1977) there is an article entitled BICYCLES IN THE ANGLO-BOER WAR OF 1899-1902, by D.R. Maree, which seems to fit this question. The 'War Cycle' carried several men on the coupling-framework in addition to the eight riders, could be fitted with a Maxim gun, and was capable of a speed of over 48 kmh. ...


12

Aircraft losses in carrier battles could be staggering. At Midway the United States lost the Yorktown with a capacity of 90 planes, but they also lost 113 carrier planes. Some of the surviving aircraft from Yorktown landed on Enterprise, refueled and rearmed, and attacked the Japanese again in the afternoon. A slightly different principle applied during ...


12

This happened many times during the period of World War 2, such as in the Battle of Coral Sea and Battle of Midway (Japan versus United States). During the Battle of Coral Sea the aircraft carrier of Japan, IJN Shoho was destroyed while its aircraft still in the air. They didn't have the technology to communicate to locate their main force. So they ditched ...


1

This is quite small in comparison to major battles, but it still remains an interesting note on how some battles which were lost are commemorated today! Vatican State, also known as the Holy See, commemorates the Sack of Rome of May 6, 1527 with the swearing in ceremony of all new recruits of the Pontifical Swiss Guards. The Swiss Guard also happens ...


-1

So most people look to movies when they think of War but this is the greatest lie ever told. Most War is simply the act of nothing getting done and even less happening (The Front.) World War 1 in the West is the textbook example of this...with the Battle of Virginia during the US Civil War an excellent precursor. It was quite common in the latter for Johnny ...


18

The existing answers provide detail on why side attacks and real breakthroughs were impossible in practice. I want to add a theoretic level why strategists might also wouldn't want them. To answer your question with emphasize on the "accept" part, I would like to refer you to a military theorist who foresaw some developments and is thus still taught at many ...


0

By intervening in the internal affairs of other large empires (China, Persia, Kievan Rus) etc., and winning. China, for instance, was split between the Jin and Song dynasties. So the Mongols allied with the Song against the Jin, and after defeating the Jin, gathered up Chinese "not Songs" against the Song. In Persia, the Mongols benefited from the fact ...


10

Generals tend to "fight the last war." That said, there are periods of defensive predominance that shape later periods of offensive predominance, and are shaped by earlier periods of offensive predominance. For instance,offensive cavalry ruled supreme between the invention of the stirrup, and the invention of defensive missile weapons such as the long bow ...


28

There were no "sides" where one might perform a side-attack. After the initial German push was defeated at the First Battle of the Marne, the British and French attacked the Germans at the First Battle of the Aisne. There, both the Germans and the Entente found how effective entrenching was against attacking troops. Having failed the frontal attacks and ...


55

sides got locked into relatively short lines of heavily defended trench warfare with little prospect of gains for either side. The lines on the Western Front were not by any stretch of the imagination "short". The Western Front ran all the way from Switzerland to the Atlantic Ocean. Side attacks? Well the Race to the Sea (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


0

1/ the fragmented and disunited nature of china of the time. The ability for the Mongols to fighting only part of china and acquire Chinese allies was absolutely crucial for the mongol conquest. without this the Mongols would not have succeeded. this is a key factor in mongol success that is often overlooked. against a strong unified China the Mongols would ...


-2

I just googled the stirrup and recommend others do the same to inform themselves on this matter if they're so inclined. Using the Horse itself as a weapon was I think what the Mongols"discovered." The Romans did not interestingly...and always favored "artillery" and massed infantry. Roman Cavalry was always legendary for its weakness. Even more odd was how ...


13

There are a number of tactical and strategic reasons that the Mongols were successful. Core of strong leaders: Not only were the upper levels of military leadership strong, but the mid-level and lower level leadership was also very strong. Flexibility of tactics: They used whatever means necessary to defeat their enemies, including using direct ...


2

Most of that huge area was and until today still is scarcely populated and thus not really "controlled", but rather "owned". Control is executed over people, cities, communities, important landmarks, important resources by the presence of military, militia and gov. institutions. And while the Mongols certainly had a lot of these under their control, most of ...


1

Answer to this question is same with the answer of the question "Why Allies doesn't have fighter aces scoring as high as Germans?" National policies. German pilots tended to return to the cockpit over and over again until they were killed, while very successful Allied pilots were routinely rotated back to training bases to educate cadet flyers.


-1

I have seen it stated that the British Navy would have been at the mercy of German bombers had the R.A.F. not contained them. Germany had a sufficient bomber force in September of 1940 to bomb day and night if required. However if the case of the Americans in the pacific, there was any amount of heavy bombers deployed against the navy of Japan. They proved ...


0

Pratt and Whitney Double Wasp engine. All German and British aircraft engines were water cooled...one hit to the cowling and their planes were done. The US Aircraft and their pilots kept being able to be sent back into theater, and given the emphasis on land battle and the vastness of Russia, the entire "air space" of Western Europe was ceded to the ...


-1

One piece of conjecture is that "Germans" invaded from Europe to the East joining up with the Mongolian Horde in the total annihilation of Baghdad. There is apparently much written in Islamic History about an "overland attack from the West" in conjunction with the Armies from the East as the reason for Baghdad's extermination. My understanding is that Polish ...


2

The Germans were enormously outnumbered. They were fighting an opponent with over ten times more oil production. At the time, the US was the largest oil producer in the world. Furthermore, the Allies were the ones focusing on strategic bombing. Germany didn't invest as much resources in air defense because it had a land war in the East going on which was ...


7

The biggest factor was the scale of pilot training. The British Commonwealth Air Training Plan appears to have trained around 110,000 pilots and claimed to have produced a surplus that caused the program to start scaling back in 1944 (RAF Museum link below). I can’t find exact figures on the American pilot training programs but I assume it dwarfed the ...


1

The ranks to command various units varied a lot more than the OP says. For example, during the US Civil War the Union army often had major generals at four or five levels of command, commanding divisions, corps, armies, groups of two or more armies within a theater of war, and the entire US army. The rebel forces more logically had brigadier generals ...


4

From my military experience, the intent is that "forward" motion leads with the blue star field. In other words, the stars lead the way forward. So it depends on which side of the uniform the flag is on. On the left shoulder the blue field is on the left side of the flag, in its normal position. On the right shoulder the blue field is on the right side of ...


1

https://www.google.com/search?q=why+is+army+flag+backwards&oq=why+is+army+&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l3.6018j0j4&client=ms-android-hms-tmobile-us&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8 Civilians often wonder why the US Army Flag Patch is reversed. The answer is: not all Army Flag Patches are reversed, but only those worn on the right shoulder. The ...


11

This is required by US Army regulations. See Army Regulation 670–1 "Uniform and Insignia - Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia" PDF, p. 35: 21–18. Wear of U.S. flag embroidered insignia a. All Soldiers will wear the full-color U.S. flag embroidered insignia on utility and organizational uniforms, unless deployed or in a field ...


4

I'm actually a little dubious of the "never defeated" claim in the first place. Not only does it seem highly unlikely, but then there's this: Khalid utilized his better understanding of terrain in every possible way to gain strategic superiority over his enemies. During his Persian campaigns, he initially never entered deep into Persian territory and ...


3

According to Winston Churchill, "A History of the English Speaking People," pp. 90-91: "For ten years, [the Duke of Marlborough led the armies of the Grand Alliance, [England, the Netherlands, several German states] and during all that period he never fought a battle he did not win or besieged a town he did not take. Nothing like this exists in the annals ...


-1

Since you mention he was in India, perhaps he could have been in part of the Hazara expedition of 1888-02.


25

Several other examples would be: Thutmose III (1481-1426 BC) Arguably one of the greatest Pharaohs. Changed a kingdom into an empire. Alexander the Great (356-323 BC): Brought, amongst others, Persia to its knees Ashoka the Great (304-232 BC): The Maurian King who spread buddism to the Indian subcontinent Scipio Africanus the Elder (236-183 BC) One of the ...



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