Tag Info

New answers tagged

8

The Premise is a bit off here. During the Crisis of the 3rd Century as well as after, the Roman army usually could win a set-piece battle over barbarians or the Persians. The difference was that the Roman army usually wasn't around where these incursions happened, and the tribes could run amok without much opposition. With the distractions of the Civil ...


0

Before the Illyrian emperors there was a lot of internal conflict. The borders of the empire were constantly weakened by troop moving on other Romans. This caused invasions of the enemy tribes who believed at that time it was opportune to invade the empire. Only when the empire was temporarily split in west and east that some stability was formed again. ...


-1

UK and Portugal had a treaty going back to 1373. Britain invoked the treaty to use the Azores Islands as base during WWII but did nothing when India conquered Goa from Portugal in 1961.


2

A typical example would be the colonization of America by European settlers, Spanish at the beginning, and other nations later. This is also a good example how a lot of sci-fi alien invasion stories (or youtube anti-European animation films) try to make a parallel and fail miserably: The meeting of the two cultures of different levels of technology didn't ...


1

Ethiopia? Although they had help from Russia et al, they successfully defended themselves against the Italians; Some using bows, arrows, and spears. They weren't so lucky during the second war. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_history_of_Ethiopia


1

Your question is pretty much the theme song of the history of Western imperial expansion. Some places to look might be a general history of imperialism. Also a book I much enjoyed that deals with this topic is James Gump, "The Dust Rose Like Smoke: The Subjugation of the Zulu and the Sioux".


3

The British conquest of Australia and subsequent genocide of the Tasmanians (still the only successful genocide in history, something for my country to be proud of there...) springs to mind as a good example. Or, on a more controversial note, the Western allies vs. Iraq in either of the Gulf wars. It's probably not the kind of thing you're thinking of but ...


4

I would consider the Mongol empire to be an example of this, depending on your definition of technology. Massed horseback archers using powerful composite bows wasn't anything that most opponents of the Mongols were ready for or knew how to handle. You could also make a similar case for the English longbow vs. the French cavalry at the battle of Agincourt


11

The Anglo-Zulu war comes to mind, as does the related movie Zulu (from 1964).


8

The Spanish invasion of the Aztec Empire, as you mentioned, is one of the best examples. I'd just like to to mention it again, because although the Aztecs eventually fell to the Spanish forces, it wasn't without a stiff fight - indeed, the Spanish probably would have never even gotten a foothold on the continent without some seriously roguish tactics such ...


8

One such example that springs to mind is Japan and the "Black Ships". "Black Ships" was a term that applied to western ships arriving in Japan in the 16th and 19th Century. The Portuguese made first contact in 1593 with the establishment of a trade route between Goa and Nagasaki, this is where the term "Black Ships" is thought to originate as the hulls of ...


3

The events leading to the Meiji restoration is a good example although less dramatic than the Conquista.


4

Wikipedia's page on conscription actually gives a pretty good breakdown. In WWII, males between 18 and 64 were required to register, but the selections were limited by executive order on December 5, 1942 from from 21–45 to 18–38. Assuming the citation (George Q. Flynn, The Draft, 1940–1973) is correct, 50 million men from 18 to 45 were registered. The ...


-1

0%. Mongols often had allied infantry (mostly Chinese), mongols occasionally fought dismounted. But mongol troops were always primarily cavalry.



Top 50 recent answers are included