Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Short Answer: Pragmatism. Long Answer: Looking at the history, there does not appear to have been much resistance to the US "running the show." This is probably due to the fact that the US, UK, and Canada were the initial parties pushing for something like NATO. This desire was intensified by the Berlin Blockade. Not to mention the fact that at the time of ...


1

Although the article on the Cuban missile crisis at Wikipedia cites John T. Correll's article from the August 2005 issue of Air Force Magazine as saying that the Soviets had possibly only 4 operational ICBMs in October 1962, the record has changed as more and more documents come to be declassified. According to Robert S. Norris' presentation at the Wilson ...


1

Tyler has given a very interesting long list. There is no doubt that the motive of an admiral burning his own ships to pre-empt any thought of retreat is an ancient and wide-spread narrative topos. But I think it is difficult to find any examples where it is reliably documented that this actually happened. Maybe only the story about the “Bounty”.


4

(1) One account of the Danaan invasion of Ireland has it that upon landing, they burned their ships, causing a great mist to rise up and terrifying the inhabitants who thought the Danaans arrived in a cloud. (2) In Book V of the Aeneid, the Trojan women attempt to burn the ships after they arrive on Sicily, but a rainstorm thwarts their plans. (3) In 351 ...


8

It depends on the location and time. Using the number of chariots to denote the size of an army is most often a Spring and Autumn practice. During this period, the traditional, ritualistic formal system of the Chou Dynasty degraded and gave way to ad hoc reforms. Part of these reforms is changes in military organisation. The Chou dynasty prescribed ...


8

There is a current List of Countries with no Armed Forces on Wikipedia. Before the 20th century, most armies were private or answerable to only individuals, not the state. You assume men fight for "countries", but even today many armies fight for a leader, not a country. To enumerate some of the armies or non-armies of the past: (1) The Constitution of the ...


-1

Egypt was also blockading Israeli shipping in the Straits of Tiran, leading to the Red Sea, and Israeli ships were also prohibited from using the Suez Canal. This was strangling Israel's economy. Faced with all this, Israel struck back -- and won a stunning victory. In a surprise move, the Israeli Air Force attacked while the Egyptian pilots were having ...


2

The answer to how Israel won the Six Day War has filled numerous books and cannot be done justice in a short-form resource like this. At best, one can only give a summary in this space, but even the summaries that came before mine have given short-shrift to some key factors. Obviously, air superiority ranks first. The Israeli Air Force's success at ...


3

Once the English stopped fighting each other, they relied on sea power for protection against continental enemies. For example: Hapsburg Spain. They would speak of their "wooden walls," meaning ships. This is only a partial example, but certainly the English relied less on fortifications than, say, the fought-over cities of the Low Countries.


3

A lot of the main reasons have already been mentioned, such as supplies, strategy (you wouldn't want to leave an enemy behind you etc) and the fact that you can setup base if you overtake it - allowing you to push forward. It would have been a strategic move to put the castle there in the first place, so being able to have that advantage is worth it. ...


2

If we talk about those small castles on hilltops which (or their ruins) can be found all over mainland Europe, it's important to first understand what their purpose was. We are not talking about early medieval castles which were just protecting the property of a single family, but military installations of late medieval to early modern Europe. So, what ...


2

When at the peak of its power, ancient Sparta had no walls around its capital city. The standard cliche one reads and hears is that the "walls" of Sparta were the fighting men of its army.


2

Walls (or physical barriers) appear to be the standard defensive structure for a city in order to keep invaders out. Are there examples of cultures/cities that successfully defended themselves without the use of barriers, and how did they accomplish that? Since the Napoleonic revolution in warfare, logistics have played a greater and greater role in ...


3

Rome did not build defensive barriers on cities or provinces for hundreds of years. They relied on the Legions marching out onto the other sides' turf and breaking up opposition. Cities without the ability to project force thousands of miles always have used walls. Even in a desert, there is rock or clay to build a defensive wall and ditch. Aside from a ...


-1

This famous photo is known to have been to been taken on VE Day in New York. Note the man in the rear in the identical sailor uniform, and the kisser is in a dark version of the same.


5

Because they're the goal Go around castles to where exactly? Military campaigns usually have some goal in mind - typical goals include (a) conquering territory; (b) robbing wealth; (c) long-term damage to an enemy. Achieving these goals requires taking the castles - in earlier times, most of important people, wealth and military force would be moved ...


1

Looks not unreasonable to me. Superficially, that looks like the US Naval Uniform, Summer white, enlisted. I did a google search on that term. I'll admit that I was disappointed by the amount of noise in the results, but I found the following examples that are similar to the pictures you've cited. Example 1 Example 2: See #3 Example 3 - I was ...


2

Most often, it would be related to supply - castles will often overlook or block roads or passes. An army requires a vast amount of food and other supplies, which can either be brought by wagon from 'home' or taken from your enemies (and thus it's likely stored in the castle). A large army might be able to walk around a castle, but then when the army has ...


27

Armies go around castles all the time, but what usually happens is that the castle is placed under siege. This is done at least with the intention of keeping the defenders in, and hopefully taking the castle via attrition, bombardment, sapping or treachery. The need to siege the castle is important; if you ignore the castle and march on, this leaves the ...


21

There are at least two reasons. The first is that a castle is usually located on the most strategic ground in the area, a hill, river, etc. Basically, it is, or controls, the most valuable "real estate' in the region. If an attacking army controls the "rest of the region" without controlling the castle, it hasn't achieved much. The second reason is that ...


55

There are two assumptions that need to be clarified. What is the attacker's strategic intent? What time are you talking about? If the attacker wants to possess the territory defended by the castle, then "going around" isn't an option. "Going around" only makes sense if the attacker wants to control territory beyond the castle. This also assumes that the ...


11

Spraff, you aren't considering why the castle is placed where it is. Does it control a ford or landing point? Does it guard the best passage through a hill/mountain range? The placement of the castle is why it exists in the first place; they're built at strategic locations which forces the enemy into either attacking or besieging them.



Top 50 recent answers are included